Brighton and Hove City Council falling behind in giving apprenticeships

The Argus: Brighton and Hove City Council announced it would aim to establish 70 apprenticeships Brighton and Hove City Council announced it would aim to establish 70 apprenticeships

Council chiefs claim they remain committed to creating apprenticeships – despite admitting the council is “falling short” of its own target.

To set a good example to businesses and encourage them to follow suit, Brighton and Hove City Council announced it would aim to establish 70 work placements for young people from November 2012. But more than a year into its 18-month project, local authority leaders have admitted they are only “half way” to meeting the target.

Admitting that budgets were under pressure, officials added the council had to balance achieving its aim against meeting need for services.


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But Labour councillor Anne Pissaridou said: “It is deeply concerning that the council looks set to fall short of its own apprenticeships target at a time where young people in the city are crying out for these kinds of opportunities.

The Green administration must work harder to create more apprenticeships at the city council for young people.”

The issue will be discussed by councillors on the authority’s children’s and young people committee on Monday.

The most recent figures show the local authority has 27 apprenticeships in place and is recruiting 13 more.

A council spokesman said: “Together with the numbers that we have coming on stream, we’ll have 46 apprentices up and running in April and we’re committed to our goal of 70.

“The important issue here is that we match the future expertise and skills needs of Brighton and Hove City Council with the need to recruit, train and develop local young talent that will help us find innovative ways to deliver the 800 services we provide every day.”

In addition, the council’s website has a separate page on the topic which asks: “Why not follow the council’s lead and see if an apprenticeship scheme would work for your business?”

But the only thing on the page is a message, saying: “The council is currently reviewing its strategy on apprenticeship and this page will be updated shortly.”

In December 2012, The Argus reported that the local authority was advertising for a “Digital Media Apprentice” on £2.65 an hour for a 37 hour week – almost two thirds less than the then living wage of £7.45.

In response, council leader Jason Kitcat said the wage rate for apprenticeships was set by central government.

Comments (4)

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2:12pm Tue 14 Jan 14

Richada says...

Well Mr Kitkat, the wage rate may well be set by local government at £2.65 an hour, but I don't think there is anything stopping the council or employers paying MORE than the minimum wage.

Unfortunately the article itself probably answers just why the Council has fallen so short in its own targets here. As long as appenticeships are associated with "slave labour" in this way, nobody will be able to attract youngsters into training.
Well Mr Kitkat, the wage rate may well be set by local government at £2.65 an hour, but I don't think there is anything stopping the council or employers paying MORE than the minimum wage. Unfortunately the article itself probably answers just why the Council has fallen so short in its own targets here. As long as appenticeships are associated with "slave labour" in this way, nobody will be able to attract youngsters into training. Richada

2:24pm Tue 14 Jan 14

brighton bluenose says...

Not much difference to the type of firms that employ unpaid interns - maybe the rate of pay is not ideal but if I was 17 and had the opportunity to get an apprenticeship again I'd bite their arm off in the current climate - even at the £100- a week offered!
Not much difference to the type of firms that employ unpaid interns - maybe the rate of pay is not ideal but if I was 17 and had the opportunity to get an apprenticeship again I'd bite their arm off in the current climate - even at the £100- a week offered! brighton bluenose

9:38pm Tue 14 Jan 14

Maxwell's Ghost says...

Apprenticeships are great if young people are learning skills with a value in the economy which will lead to employment.
They are proving to be a more effective way for young people to get on the career ladder with some great businesses without paying vast fees to go to uni.
Check out some of the blue chip companies which are now scouring sixth forms and colleges for bright 16 year olds to train them and get them into a great career.
Anyone without a skill is vulnerable to being used as slave labour and that can include uni graduates, so get a skill which leads to employment.
Apprenticeships are great if young people are learning skills with a value in the economy which will lead to employment. They are proving to be a more effective way for young people to get on the career ladder with some great businesses without paying vast fees to go to uni. Check out some of the blue chip companies which are now scouring sixth forms and colleges for bright 16 year olds to train them and get them into a great career. Anyone without a skill is vulnerable to being used as slave labour and that can include uni graduates, so get a skill which leads to employment. Maxwell's Ghost

10:24pm Tue 14 Jan 14

ourcoalition says...

Time for a bit more of an adventurous approach in the 6th richest country in the world - how about real jobs for young people, on real wages - is it really revolutionary to suggest £7.65 an hour for all, as a minimum. Or do we accept a low wage, temporary job economy?

Benefits include - more consumer spending, fairness, and hope for our young people.

How to fund it - take 10% from the richest 5% - they really wouldn't notice any effect on their standard of living - everyone else would, in the best possible way.
Time for a bit more of an adventurous approach in the 6th richest country in the world - how about real jobs for young people, on real wages - is it really revolutionary to suggest £7.65 an hour for all, as a minimum. Or do we accept a low wage, temporary job economy? Benefits include - more consumer spending, fairness, and hope for our young people. How to fund it - take 10% from the richest 5% - they really wouldn't notice any effect on their standard of living - everyone else would, in the best possible way. ourcoalition

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