Cows move into new home on South Downs

Cows move into new home

Cows move into new home

First published in News

Three new bovine residents have moved into their new home on the South Downs coastline.

The three cattle, two British whites and one British black, have been introduced at Seaford Head by Seaford Town Council and the Sussex Wildlife Trust.

The cows are part of a management plan that was commissioned by Seaford Local Nature Reserve Committee.

The site is suffering from overgrazing in some areas and a lack of grazing in others.

Sussex Wildlife Trust took over the management of the 83- hectare site for Seaford Town Council at the beginning of June 2013.

The cattle will be kept on the land for around two months and will be subject to daily checks as the best course of action for management of the preserve until 2017 is assessed.

Graeme Lyons, senior ecologist at Sussex Wildlife, said: “The cows have been introduced to stop the grassland scrubbing over.”

Mr Lyons said that due to the levels of scrubland currently growing on the site, the three cows’ breeds were selected as they are “good at eating the rough stuff”.

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5:48pm Fri 28 Mar 14

fredflintstone1 says...

What next? We can't have long to wait now until the Sussex Wildlife Trust starts pig farming, discouraging even more people from using open countryside as they turn out an ever-increasing assortment of animals on to public land.

How on earth did the Downs survive before the Trust declared war on scrub (which is actually a very valuable wildlife habitat for a host of species), and decided to pursue a policy of farming for free?
What next? We can't have long to wait now until the Sussex Wildlife Trust starts pig farming, discouraging even more people from using open countryside as they turn out an ever-increasing assortment of animals on to public land. How on earth did the Downs survive before the Trust declared war on scrub (which is actually a very valuable wildlife habitat for a host of species), and decided to pursue a policy of farming for free? fredflintstone1
  • Score: 0

6:45pm Fri 28 Mar 14

somerandombloke says...

fredflintstone1 wrote:
What next? We can't have long to wait now until the Sussex Wildlife Trust starts pig farming, discouraging even more people from using open countryside as they turn out an ever-increasing assortment of animals on to public land.

How on earth did the Downs survive before the Trust declared war on scrub (which is actually a very valuable wildlife habitat for a host of species), and decided to pursue a policy of farming for free?
If the Downs were left without management it would be back to scrub in no time. The valuable chalk grassland doesn't want to be grassland it wants to be scrub, so it has to be managed.
[quote][p][bold]fredflintstone1[/bold] wrote: What next? We can't have long to wait now until the Sussex Wildlife Trust starts pig farming, discouraging even more people from using open countryside as they turn out an ever-increasing assortment of animals on to public land. How on earth did the Downs survive before the Trust declared war on scrub (which is actually a very valuable wildlife habitat for a host of species), and decided to pursue a policy of farming for free?[/p][/quote]If the Downs were left without management it would be back to scrub in no time. The valuable chalk grassland doesn't want to be grassland it wants to be scrub, so it has to be managed. somerandombloke
  • Score: 0

7:19pm Sat 29 Mar 14

Stig Thundercock says...

fredflintstone1 wrote:
What next? We can't have long to wait now until the Sussex Wildlife Trust starts pig farming, discouraging even more people from using open countryside as they turn out an ever-increasing assortment of animals on to public land.

How on earth did the Downs survive before the Trust declared war on scrub (which is actually a very valuable wildlife habitat for a host of species), and decided to pursue a policy of farming for free?
In answer to your question, centuries of sheep farming. The scrub returned once that declined. If you actually bother to go walking in the countryside you'll find most breeds of cows are harmless and it is actually illegal for farmers to keep certain dangerous breeds in fields where there is public access.
[quote][p][bold]fredflintstone1[/bold] wrote: What next? We can't have long to wait now until the Sussex Wildlife Trust starts pig farming, discouraging even more people from using open countryside as they turn out an ever-increasing assortment of animals on to public land. How on earth did the Downs survive before the Trust declared war on scrub (which is actually a very valuable wildlife habitat for a host of species), and decided to pursue a policy of farming for free?[/p][/quote]In answer to your question, centuries of sheep farming. The scrub returned once that declined. If you actually bother to go walking in the countryside you'll find most breeds of cows are harmless and it is actually illegal for farmers to keep certain dangerous breeds in fields where there is public access. Stig Thundercock
  • Score: 1

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