Parking will be reduced in Hanover if communal bins approved

Communal bins in Lewes Road

Communal bins in Lewes Road

First published in News by , Chief reporter

A council has been accused of trying to keep secret the number of parking spaces to be lost as communal bins are rolled out.

Residents in the Hanover area of Brighton are currently being consulted about Brighton and Hove City Council’s plans to bring in huge containers.

But the Hanover and Elm Grove Labour Group has now accused the council of trying to keep the number of parking spaces to be lost under the scheme a secret.

A leaflet delivered to homes across Hanover makes the claims, saying: “42, the number the council doesn’t want you to know.”

Tracey Hill, of Hanover and Elm Grove Labour Party, said: “At the meeting, councillors asked them to make it clear how many parking spaces would be lost.

“People should be told what’s being considered. The alternative would be to keep kerbside recycling, but there could be a push on recycling and fines for offenders.

“Parking spaces are already squeezed because a Controlled Parking Zone (CPZ) was introduced in ten streets at the top of Southover Street and this is having a knock on effect.

Communal bins are yet another thing that will have an effect on car owners in Hanover.

“Ultimately it is up to the residents of Hanover to decide but they should have had the full facts laid out in front of them.”

Public consultation

The consultation period runs until December 3, and residents have been urged to have their say.

A spokeswoman for the city council confirmed that 42 parking spaces would be lost if the scheme is implemented.

She added that the number had probably been left out of the leaflet because there was “lots of information to fit in”.

In a statement the council said: “Our leaflet makes it quite clear that parking spaces would be lost if communal bins are introduced.

“Information sent to households includes a map showing where bins might be located so residents can easily see if any parking spaces could be lost and where.”

An exhibition of the proposals was held at the Hanover Centre in Southover Street, from 3pm to 6.30pm on Tuesday, November 20.

A second event will be held at the Salvation Army Brighton Congress Hall in Park Crescent Terrace on November 29 from 3pm to 6.30pm.

Take part in the council consultation on its website consult.brighton-hove.gov.uk

 

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Comments (26)

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12:36pm Thu 22 Nov 12

toldsloth says...

There is no such thing as a "public Consultation" with this bunch - they will implement this come hell or high water. A bit like the Lewes Road scheme and the wrecking of The Level.

There is no such thing as democracy in Brighton - the students were stupid enough to vote the Green Party into power and everybody else will just have to put up with them until the next round of elections when they will be thrown out on their ear.
There is no such thing as a "public Consultation" with this bunch - they will implement this come hell or high water. A bit like the Lewes Road scheme and the wrecking of The Level. There is no such thing as democracy in Brighton - the students were stupid enough to vote the Green Party into power and everybody else will just have to put up with them until the next round of elections when they will be thrown out on their ear. toldsloth
  • Score: 0

12:37pm Thu 22 Nov 12

toldsloth says...

There is no such thing as a "public Consultation" with this bunch - they will implement this come hell or high water. A bit like the Lewes Road scheme and the wrecking of The Level.

There is no such thing as democracy in Brighton - the students were stupid enough to vote the Green Party into power and everybody else will just have to put up with them until the next round of elections when they will be thrown out on their ear.
There is no such thing as a "public Consultation" with this bunch - they will implement this come hell or high water. A bit like the Lewes Road scheme and the wrecking of The Level. There is no such thing as democracy in Brighton - the students were stupid enough to vote the Green Party into power and everybody else will just have to put up with them until the next round of elections when they will be thrown out on their ear. toldsloth
  • Score: 0

12:37pm Thu 22 Nov 12

toldsloth says...

There is no such thing as a "public Consultation" with this bunch - they will implement this come hell or high water. A bit like the Lewes Road scheme and the wrecking of The Level.

There is no such thing as democracy in Brighton - the students were stupid enough to vote the Green Party into power and everybody else will just have to put up with them until the next round of elections when they will be thrown out on their ear.
There is no such thing as a "public Consultation" with this bunch - they will implement this come hell or high water. A bit like the Lewes Road scheme and the wrecking of The Level. There is no such thing as democracy in Brighton - the students were stupid enough to vote the Green Party into power and everybody else will just have to put up with them until the next round of elections when they will be thrown out on their ear. toldsloth
  • Score: 0

12:44pm Thu 22 Nov 12

toldsloth says...

Apologies for multiple posts all - website had a hiccup....
Apologies for multiple posts all - website had a hiccup.... toldsloth
  • Score: 0

12:53pm Thu 22 Nov 12

reagull says...

I live in Cromwell Road, Hove,
they have either put the bins in a car parking space or rather stupidly in places, on double yellow lines. trying to pull out of the bottom of Wilbury Villas at the cross roads was always dangerous, there is now a large black bin to obscure traffic approaching from the right so you have to pull out even further into oncoming traffic. If I park my car on double yellow lines it is considered a hazard and I will get fined. why is is OK to place a large bin there instead? surely this compromises the safety of all road users?
I live in Cromwell Road, Hove, they have either put the bins in a car parking space or rather stupidly in places, on double yellow lines. trying to pull out of the bottom of Wilbury Villas at the cross roads was always dangerous, there is now a large black bin to obscure traffic approaching from the right so you have to pull out even further into oncoming traffic. If I park my car on double yellow lines it is considered a hazard and I will get fined. why is is OK to place a large bin there instead? surely this compromises the safety of all road users? reagull
  • Score: 0

1:02pm Thu 22 Nov 12

Hove Actually says...

When these lying bar stewards increase the length of double yellow lines round Hove they stated it was to increase Road Safety for children crossing, many of these are full of Black bins making it worst as you cannot see through them like most cars etc.

How many black bins are there across
the City? and how many spaces have been lost? and how many EXTRA resident permits have been sold for spaces that don't even exist?
When these lying bar stewards increase the length of double yellow lines round Hove they stated it was to increase Road Safety for children crossing, many of these are full of Black bins making it worst as you cannot see through them like most cars etc. How many black bins are there across the City? and how many spaces have been lost? and how many EXTRA resident permits have been sold for spaces that don't even exist? Hove Actually
  • Score: 0

1:48pm Thu 22 Nov 12

StyleCop says...

reagull wrote:
I live in Cromwell Road, Hove, they have either put the bins in a car parking space or rather stupidly in places, on double yellow lines. trying to pull out of the bottom of Wilbury Villas at the cross roads was always dangerous, there is now a large black bin to obscure traffic approaching from the right so you have to pull out even further into oncoming traffic. If I park my car on double yellow lines it is considered a hazard and I will get fined. why is is OK to place a large bin there instead? surely this compromises the safety of all road users?
Indeed & well said - I made that very point in the Parking consultation forms that were distributed earlier this year...

I doubt it'll change anything though... but you're absolutely right.
[quote][p][bold]reagull[/bold] wrote: I live in Cromwell Road, Hove, they have either put the bins in a car parking space or rather stupidly in places, on double yellow lines. trying to pull out of the bottom of Wilbury Villas at the cross roads was always dangerous, there is now a large black bin to obscure traffic approaching from the right so you have to pull out even further into oncoming traffic. If I park my car on double yellow lines it is considered a hazard and I will get fined. why is is OK to place a large bin there instead? surely this compromises the safety of all road users?[/p][/quote]Indeed & well said - I made that very point in the Parking consultation forms that were distributed earlier this year... I doubt it'll change anything though... but you're absolutely right. StyleCop
  • Score: 0

2:04pm Thu 22 Nov 12

Noah Lott says...

Out of the all of the communal bin sites throughout our City which take up valuable on street parking space - the very point being argued for within this article - why then show a picture of a - admittedly grotesque - communal bin site that is actually sited on a pavement, therefore having no bearing on the road/area's current parking scheme?! Its position on Lewes Road has not and does not deprive any persons of parking! Surely there would have been better examples to show the residents of Hanover what they can expect; those in the Lansdowne Place/Brunswick Road/etc area perhaps?
Out of the all of the communal bin sites throughout our City which take up valuable on street parking space - the very point being argued for within this article - why then show a picture of a - admittedly grotesque - communal bin site that is actually sited on a pavement, therefore having no bearing on the road/area's current parking scheme?! Its position on Lewes Road has not and does not deprive any persons of parking! Surely there would have been better examples to show the residents of Hanover what they can expect; those in the Lansdowne Place/Brunswick Road/etc area perhaps? Noah Lott
  • Score: 0

3:35pm Thu 22 Nov 12

funkyyoyo says...

im going to look into the legality of parking these 4 wheel devices as they dont appear to display a valid parking ticket/permit!!!
im going to look into the legality of parking these 4 wheel devices as they dont appear to display a valid parking ticket/permit!!! funkyyoyo
  • Score: 0

4:06pm Thu 22 Nov 12

Mr Sworld says...

funkyyoyo wrote:
im going to look into the legality of parking these 4 wheel devices as they dont appear to display a valid parking ticket/permit!!!
As they aren't motor vehicles and will be in marked bays they don't need a permit.

Yoyo, you make me ho, ho...
[quote][p][bold]funkyyoyo[/bold] wrote: im going to look into the legality of parking these 4 wheel devices as they dont appear to display a valid parking ticket/permit!!![/p][/quote]As they aren't motor vehicles and will be in marked bays they don't need a permit. Yoyo, you make me ho, ho... Mr Sworld
  • Score: 0

4:38pm Thu 22 Nov 12

south-coast says...

Common sense tells us that roads are better suited to cars than bins.

Has it been considered that heavy bins on wheels and large hills won't be the best of ideas.

Out of interest how much did the consultation cost, and how many parking spaces have been lost to bins in Brighton and Hove?
Common sense tells us that roads are better suited to cars than bins. Has it been considered that heavy bins on wheels and large hills won't be the best of ideas. Out of interest how much did the consultation cost, and how many parking spaces have been lost to bins in Brighton and Hove? south-coast
  • Score: 0

7:50pm Thu 22 Nov 12

Surely not! says...

south-coast wrote:
Common sense tells us that roads are better suited to cars than bins.

Has it been considered that heavy bins on wheels and large hills won't be the best of ideas.

Out of interest how much did the consultation cost, and how many parking spaces have been lost to bins in Brighton and Hove?
Common Sense tells us the roads of Hannover are better suited to horses and carts than cars.

Has it been considered that heavy cars on wheels and large hills won't be the best of ideas.

Out of interest have you ever formulated a logical and argument?
[quote][p][bold]south-coast[/bold] wrote: Common sense tells us that roads are better suited to cars than bins. Has it been considered that heavy bins on wheels and large hills won't be the best of ideas. Out of interest how much did the consultation cost, and how many parking spaces have been lost to bins in Brighton and Hove?[/p][/quote]Common Sense tells us the roads of Hannover are better suited to horses and carts than cars. Has it been considered that heavy cars on wheels and large hills won't be the best of ideas. Out of interest have you ever formulated a logical and argument? Surely not!
  • Score: 0

8:14pm Thu 22 Nov 12

Somethingsarejustwrong says...

Surely not! wrote:
south-coast wrote:
Common sense tells us that roads are better suited to cars than bins.

Has it been considered that heavy bins on wheels and large hills won't be the best of ideas.

Out of interest how much did the consultation cost, and how many parking spaces have been lost to bins in Brighton and Hove?
Common Sense tells us the roads of Hannover are better suited to horses and carts than cars.

Has it been considered that heavy cars on wheels and large hills won't be the best of ideas.

Out of interest have you ever formulated a logical and argument?
I can't see an issue.
[quote][p][bold]Surely not![/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]south-coast[/bold] wrote: Common sense tells us that roads are better suited to cars than bins. Has it been considered that heavy bins on wheels and large hills won't be the best of ideas. Out of interest how much did the consultation cost, and how many parking spaces have been lost to bins in Brighton and Hove?[/p][/quote]Common Sense tells us the roads of Hannover are better suited to horses and carts than cars. Has it been considered that heavy cars on wheels and large hills won't be the best of ideas. Out of interest have you ever formulated a logical and argument?[/p][/quote]I can't see an issue. Somethingsarejustwrong
  • Score: 0

8:42pm Thu 22 Nov 12

Uncle_Meat says...

These stupid large bins wouldn't be needed if this lazy council actually enforced their own laws. PUT YOUR BINS OUT ON COLLECTION DAY AND TAKE THEM IN IMMEDIATELY AFTERWARDS! The same goes for recycling tubs. Fine people who are too lazy/ignorant to follow the law.
These stupid large bins wouldn't be needed if this lazy council actually enforced their own laws. PUT YOUR BINS OUT ON COLLECTION DAY AND TAKE THEM IN IMMEDIATELY AFTERWARDS! The same goes for recycling tubs. Fine people who are too lazy/ignorant to follow the law. Uncle_Meat
  • Score: 0

10:07pm Thu 22 Nov 12

Ilyich says...

This article is not right at all. The Ms Hill believes the alternative is recycling, when clearly is refuse being talked about. Also she is saying that streets at top of Southover recently became CPZ'Z when this actually happened to streets to south of Albion Hill. With 75% of her statement wrong, how are we to believe the other 25%?

Re others above, a communal bins takes up space of one car but is of use to many houses, so is clearly more helpful to community than one persons car.
I think Labours are championing individuals motoring requirements of priveliged few over scheme to benefit whole community and this does not suprise me.
This article is not right at all. The Ms Hill believes the alternative is recycling, when clearly is refuse being talked about. Also she is saying that streets at top of Southover recently became CPZ'Z when this actually happened to streets to south of Albion Hill. With 75% of her statement wrong, how are we to believe the other 25%? Re others above, a communal bins takes up space of one car but is of use to many houses, so is clearly more helpful to community than one persons car. I think Labours are championing individuals motoring requirements of priveliged few over scheme to benefit whole community and this does not suprise me. Ilyich
  • Score: 0

7:02am Fri 23 Nov 12

Jimmy Stewart's Imaginary Rabbit says...

Surely not! wrote:
south-coast wrote:
Common sense tells us that roads are better suited to cars than bins.

Has it been considered that heavy bins on wheels and large hills won't be the best of ideas.

Out of interest how much did the consultation cost, and how many parking spaces have been lost to bins in Brighton and Hove?
Common Sense tells us the roads of Hannover are better suited to horses and carts than cars.

Has it been considered that heavy cars on wheels and large hills won't be the best of ideas.

Out of interest have you ever formulated a logical and argument?
If you'd ever read any history on Brighton you'll know that in the days of the horse and cart they had terrible problems getting up and down the hills. (At Brighton station they can show you the old entrance where you can still see the marks in the walls that were made where they used to jam their wheels against the walls to stop them from sliding back). Cars are a much better form of transport for negotiating hills, so 'south-coast' is right and you are wrong.
[quote][p][bold]Surely not![/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]south-coast[/bold] wrote: Common sense tells us that roads are better suited to cars than bins. Has it been considered that heavy bins on wheels and large hills won't be the best of ideas. Out of interest how much did the consultation cost, and how many parking spaces have been lost to bins in Brighton and Hove?[/p][/quote]Common Sense tells us the roads of Hannover are better suited to horses and carts than cars. Has it been considered that heavy cars on wheels and large hills won't be the best of ideas. Out of interest have you ever formulated a logical and argument?[/p][/quote]If you'd ever read any history on Brighton you'll know that in the days of the horse and cart they had terrible problems getting up and down the hills. (At Brighton station they can show you the old entrance where you can still see the marks in the walls that were made where they used to jam their wheels against the walls to stop them from sliding back). Cars are a much better form of transport for negotiating hills, so 'south-coast' is right and you are wrong. Jimmy Stewart's Imaginary Rabbit
  • Score: 0

9:55am Fri 23 Nov 12

Chaffinch1 says...

Do these bins really benefit the community as Ilyich suggests?

I live near Brighton station, where the communal bins have been in place for a year or so.

Since the bins were installed, kerbside refuse collection has ceased. Our nearest bin is 150 metres away, which makes taking the rubbish out really hard for the old and infirm or for people with small children who can't be left at home alone while you carry a heavy bin bag out to the bins.

I don't think this measure is for the community's benefit, more likely it's for the benefit of the contractors the council uses to collect the waste.
Do these bins really benefit the community as Ilyich suggests? I live near Brighton station, where the communal bins have been in place for a year or so. Since the bins were installed, kerbside refuse collection has ceased. Our nearest bin is 150 metres away, which makes taking the rubbish out really hard for the old and infirm or for people with small children who can't be left at home alone while you carry a heavy bin bag out to the bins. I don't think this measure is for the community's benefit, more likely it's for the benefit of the contractors the council uses to collect the waste. Chaffinch1
  • Score: 0

12:26pm Fri 23 Nov 12

Palace of Wisdom says...

These bins are lethal. I cannot recall the number of times I have had near misses whilst emerging from a junction trying to see round them - at least with cars parked on these double yellow corner safety spaces you can see through the windows or over them!!
These bins are lethal. I cannot recall the number of times I have had near misses whilst emerging from a junction trying to see round them - at least with cars parked on these double yellow corner safety spaces you can see through the windows or over them!! Palace of Wisdom
  • Score: 0

12:58pm Fri 23 Nov 12

Surely not! says...

Palace of Wisdom wrote:
These bins are lethal. I cannot recall the number of times I have had near misses whilst emerging from a junction trying to see round them - at least with cars parked on these double yellow corner safety spaces you can see through the windows or over them!!
Get a life you boring whinging and obviously inept bunch!
[quote][p][bold]Palace of Wisdom[/bold] wrote: These bins are lethal. I cannot recall the number of times I have had near misses whilst emerging from a junction trying to see round them - at least with cars parked on these double yellow corner safety spaces you can see through the windows or over them!![/p][/quote]Get a life you boring whinging and obviously inept bunch! Surely not!
  • Score: 0

1:32pm Fri 23 Nov 12

Palace of Wisdom says...

Bunch?
Bunch? Palace of Wisdom
  • Score: 0

1:45pm Fri 23 Nov 12

Fairfax Sakes says...

Someone needs to get some hoses out. And turn them on the council. Immediately.
Someone needs to get some hoses out. And turn them on the council. Immediately. Fairfax Sakes
  • Score: 0

3:44pm Fri 23 Nov 12

tdwright says...

I found the Labour leaflet to be extremely misleading. The original council consultation made clear that:
1) Parking spaces would be lost (there was even a map!)
2) The decision would be made on a street-by-street basis
This second point means that 42 is the upper bound rather than the guaranteed amount. 42, by the way, represents only about 3% of the current number of parking spaces in the area.
I, for one, can't wait to see the back of the "binvelopes", which are dirty and clog up our pavements.
Lastly, if we are going to talk about parking, why do so many people oppose a CPZ? It would spell the end of Hanover being the city centre's dumping ground for cars and make parking easier for residents.
Sometimes it seems like people just don't like change very much.
I found the Labour leaflet to be extremely misleading. The original council consultation made clear that: 1) Parking spaces would be lost (there was even a map!) 2) The decision would be made on a street-by-street basis This second point means that 42 is the upper bound rather than the guaranteed amount. 42, by the way, represents only about 3% of the current number of parking spaces in the area. I, for one, can't wait to see the back of the "binvelopes", which are dirty and clog up our pavements. Lastly, if we are going to talk about parking, why do so many people oppose a CPZ? It would spell the end of Hanover being the city centre's dumping ground for cars and make parking easier for residents. Sometimes it seems like people just don't like change very much. tdwright
  • Score: 0

9:37pm Mon 26 Nov 12

hamishhove says...

Ilyich wrote:
This article is not right at all. The Ms Hill believes the alternative is recycling, when clearly is refuse being talked about. Also she is saying that streets at top of Southover recently became CPZ'Z when this actually happened to streets to south of Albion Hill. With 75% of her statement wrong, how are we to believe the other 25%?

Re others above, a communal bins takes up space of one car but is of use to many houses, so is clearly more helpful to community than one persons car.
I think Labours are championing individuals motoring requirements of priveliged few over scheme to benefit whole community and this does not suprise me.
exactly....all about rubbish!!! not recycling, shame either the Argus or the Labour Councillor couldnt (which?) couldnt get this correct, so people can make their OWN informed decision
[quote][p][bold]Ilyich[/bold] wrote: This article is not right at all. The Ms Hill believes the alternative is recycling, when clearly is refuse being talked about. Also she is saying that streets at top of Southover recently became CPZ'Z when this actually happened to streets to south of Albion Hill. With 75% of her statement wrong, how are we to believe the other 25%? Re others above, a communal bins takes up space of one car but is of use to many houses, so is clearly more helpful to community than one persons car. I think Labours are championing individuals motoring requirements of priveliged few over scheme to benefit whole community and this does not suprise me.[/p][/quote]exactly....all about rubbish!!! not recycling, shame either the Argus or the Labour Councillor couldnt (which?) couldnt get this correct, so people can make their OWN informed decision hamishhove
  • Score: 0

9:42pm Mon 26 Nov 12

hamishhove says...

yes to bins but nope if i was in hanover not four...too much
yes to bins but nope if i was in hanover not four...too much hamishhove
  • Score: 0

8:04pm Tue 27 Nov 12

CMStockel says...

For what it's worth, I live in Hanover, do not own a car, and oppose these measures. From what I've seen, the bins are unsightly, as they are often full and have junk left around them. Mattresses, barbeques, scrap wood and other material better brought to the dump are left by the bins, sometimes for days. Hanover is a small scale area that can't really handle that amount of dumping.
Moreover, it might be difficult for older people living in the area.
I have my own small bin that does not block the pavement (I also use a pram) and keeps gulls away. If others could simply follow suit, this would be a non-issue.
I have filled out the consulation survey and also signed a petition. I hope others who feel the same also do so. Apathy will surely see communal bins come to every street.

CMS
For what it's worth, I live in Hanover, do not own a car, and oppose these measures. From what I've seen, the bins are unsightly, as they are often full and have junk left around them. Mattresses, barbeques, scrap wood and other material better brought to the dump are left by the bins, sometimes for days. Hanover is a small scale area that can't really handle that amount of dumping. Moreover, it might be difficult for older people living in the area. I have my own small bin that does not block the pavement (I also use a pram) and keeps gulls away. If others could simply follow suit, this would be a non-issue. I have filled out the consulation survey and also signed a petition. I hope others who feel the same also do so. Apathy will surely see communal bins come to every street. CMS CMStockel
  • Score: 0

11:50pm Mon 10 Dec 12

Resident in Hanover says...

tdwright wrote:
I found the Labour leaflet to be extremely misleading. The original council consultation made clear that:
1) Parking spaces would be lost (there was even a map!)
2) The decision would be made on a street-by-street basis
This second point means that 42 is the upper bound rather than the guaranteed amount. 42, by the way, represents only about 3% of the current number of parking spaces in the area.
I, for one, can't wait to see the back of the "binvelopes", which are dirty and clog up our pavements.
Lastly, if we are going to talk about parking, why do so many people oppose a CPZ? It would spell the end of Hanover being the city centre's dumping ground for cars and make parking easier for residents.
Sometimes it seems like people just don't like change very much.
And where did the 3% calculation come from? Sounds like poppycock to me.

I'm pleased that you, for one, are single minded enough to enjoy the prospect of communal bins. I just signed a petition with hundreds and hundreds and hundreds of Hanover Household names stating the desire for otherwise.

Sometimes, it seems like people just like change for the sake of it.
[quote][p][bold]tdwright[/bold] wrote: I found the Labour leaflet to be extremely misleading. The original council consultation made clear that: 1) Parking spaces would be lost (there was even a map!) 2) The decision would be made on a street-by-street basis This second point means that 42 is the upper bound rather than the guaranteed amount. 42, by the way, represents only about 3% of the current number of parking spaces in the area. I, for one, can't wait to see the back of the "binvelopes", which are dirty and clog up our pavements. Lastly, if we are going to talk about parking, why do so many people oppose a CPZ? It would spell the end of Hanover being the city centre's dumping ground for cars and make parking easier for residents. Sometimes it seems like people just don't like change very much.[/p][/quote]And where did the 3% calculation come from? Sounds like poppycock to me. I'm pleased that you, for one, are single minded enough to enjoy the prospect of communal bins. I just signed a petition with hundreds and hundreds and hundreds of Hanover Household names stating the desire for otherwise. Sometimes, it seems like people just like change for the sake of it. Resident in Hanover
  • Score: 0

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