Nature lovers create a haven for bees in Brighton and Hove

Natura lovers are making a beeline for wildlife.

Brighton and Hove Friends of the Earth is working with Friends of Hollingbury and Burstead Woods to create a new haven for bees.

The site is part of Friends of the Earth’s Bee Cause campaign in Burstead Wood.

Lesley Brown, projects officer of the Friends of Hollingbury and Burstead Woods, said the overgrown south-facing bank will be transformed into perfect habitat for solitary bees.

Both groups will clear the steep slope on January 6 to expose chalky soil which some bees love.

“We are really pleased to be creating a new environment, which will not only encourage bees but a whole range of other wildlife in the woods.”

Ms Brown claimed that in the 60 years since Queen Elizabeth came to the throne 97 % of our important natural grasslands have been lost.

To mark the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee, Friends of The Earth has committed to creating 60 bee-friendly patches in towns and rural areas across the UK.

Monica Jennings, of Brighton and Hove Friends of the Earth, said: “We hope to encourage a range of solitary bees such as red mason bee, carpenter bee and leafcutter bee.

"Solitary bees are important as crop pollinators and we need to ensure they survive.”

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Comments (2)

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10:55pm Wed 12 Dec 12

Hove Actually says...

Good news, well done to those involved
Good news, well done to those involved Hove Actually

11:15am Thu 13 Dec 12

nosolution says...

Whilst i agree loss of chalk grassland has been just as rapid in recent years,18%loss since 1990 according to Defra.gov.uk,all wildlife habitat is in steep decine-19.5%urban 1.5%roads (england)source defra.gov.uk I hope the good friends of Hollingbury have done a secondary species clearance impact survey(if bees are the primary species to be conserved) In other words what wildlife lose out when they clear the 'offending' scrub...
Whilst i agree loss of chalk grassland has been just as rapid in recent years,18%loss since 1990 according to Defra.gov.uk,all wildlife habitat is in steep decine-19.5%urban 1.5%roads (england)source defra.gov.uk I hope the good friends of Hollingbury have done a secondary species clearance impact survey(if bees are the primary species to be conserved) In other words what wildlife lose out when they clear the 'offending' scrub... nosolution

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