The ArgusPlans for controversial wind farm withdrawn (From The Argus)

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Plans for controversial wind farm withdrawn

The Argus: An artist's impression of how the Rampion wind farm could look An artist's impression of how the Rampion wind farm could look

PLANS for a huge offshore wind farm have been withdrawn over fears surrounding consultations.

E.ON had submitted an application to build the Rampion wind farm eight miles out to sea from Worthing to Newhaven.

The huge project would have seen 185 turbines generating 665 megawatts of power off the Sussex coast.

But a letter sent to the planning inspectorate on January 2 said it wanted to temporarily withdraw the application.

The letter said that following the submission it had emerged that there were “certain omissions in respect of the Section 42 Consultation element of the application”.

Section 42 of the Planning Act 2008 places a duty on the promoter of major infrastructure projects to consult interested parties.

The letter added: “Having reviewed the situation and taken advice on the materiality of these omissions in conjunction with discussions the project team has had with (the Planning Inspectorate), E.ON has fully committed to address these points prior to the secretary of state making his decision on whether to accept the application for examination”.

'Committed to project'

A spokeswoman for E.ON said: “We want the application to be complete before the Planning Inspectorate decides whether to accept it and the only way to do this is to withdraw it and resubmit again as soon as we are ready.

“We remain completely committed to the project, but wish to take extra time now to maintain our comprehensive approach to consultation.”

In December, E.ON announced it was reducing the number of turbines at the site after concerns raised by the public consultation.

This included a change to the project’s layout following talks with surfing group Surfers against Sewage.

The proposal has received mixed views on the coast.

It is due to create up to 85 jobs after Newhaven Port won the contract to become the operations and maintenance base.

The energy firm said the move could create full-time permanent jobs with the majority of workers being recruited locally.

But there are fears the wind farm would have an adverse affect on nature, as a draft environmental report in July suggested marine mammals, fish and other large marine organisms could be affected during the construction.

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Comments (17)

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8:47am Mon 7 Jan 13

john5001 says...

shorham wants them
shorham wants them john5001
  • Score: 0

9:12am Mon 7 Jan 13

Mayan Turkey says...

This outdated and inefficient technology being used at sea seems crazy. The UK can lead the way with cutting-edge tidal energy systems - not this outdated, hard to maintain, junk.

Wind farms at sea are an embarrassing step in a journey towards more environmentally responsible energy solutions. They don't appear to have any sensible place in future sea installations.

The UK coastline should not be a dumping-ground for redundant technology.
This outdated and inefficient technology being used at sea seems crazy. The UK can lead the way with cutting-edge tidal energy systems - not this outdated, hard to maintain, junk. Wind farms at sea are an embarrassing step in a journey towards more environmentally responsible energy solutions. They don't appear to have any sensible place in future sea installations. The UK coastline should not be a dumping-ground for redundant technology. Mayan Turkey
  • Score: 0

9:29am Mon 7 Jan 13

Morpheus says...

Mayan Turkey wrote:
This outdated and inefficient technology being used at sea seems crazy. The UK can lead the way with cutting-edge tidal energy systems - not this outdated, hard to maintain, junk.

Wind farms at sea are an embarrassing step in a journey towards more environmentally responsible energy solutions. They don't appear to have any sensible place in future sea installations.

The UK coastline should not be a dumping-ground for redundant technology.
What proven tidal energy system?
[quote][p][bold]Mayan Turkey[/bold] wrote: This outdated and inefficient technology being used at sea seems crazy. The UK can lead the way with cutting-edge tidal energy systems - not this outdated, hard to maintain, junk. Wind farms at sea are an embarrassing step in a journey towards more environmentally responsible energy solutions. They don't appear to have any sensible place in future sea installations. The UK coastline should not be a dumping-ground for redundant technology.[/p][/quote]What proven tidal energy system? Morpheus
  • Score: 0

9:56am Mon 7 Jan 13

Joshiman says...

At last Common sense prevails.Worldwide thre are now derelict wind farms.
At last Common sense prevails.Worldwide thre are now derelict wind farms. Joshiman
  • Score: 0

11:25am Mon 7 Jan 13

Tailgaters Anonymous says...

..and it seems the existing installations around the English coast function far less time than available wind speed suggests they should: technical problems maybe?
..and it seems the existing installations around the English coast function far less time than available wind speed suggests they should: technical problems maybe? Tailgaters Anonymous
  • Score: 0

1:12pm Mon 7 Jan 13

MuammarQaddafi says...

Morpheus wrote:
Mayan Turkey wrote:
This outdated and inefficient technology being used at sea seems crazy. The UK can lead the way with cutting-edge tidal energy systems - not this outdated, hard to maintain, junk.

Wind farms at sea are an embarrassing step in a journey towards more environmentally responsible energy solutions. They don't appear to have any sensible place in future sea installations.

The UK coastline should not be a dumping-ground for redundant technology.
What proven tidal energy system?
La Rance in Brittany, just across the Channel, going since 1966; Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia, Canada, going since 1984; Jingxia, China, since 1985; Sihwa Lake, South Koria, opened in 2011; and a SeaGen system at Strangford Lough since 2008. You don't hear much about them because they just work.
[quote][p][bold]Morpheus[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Mayan Turkey[/bold] wrote: This outdated and inefficient technology being used at sea seems crazy. The UK can lead the way with cutting-edge tidal energy systems - not this outdated, hard to maintain, junk. Wind farms at sea are an embarrassing step in a journey towards more environmentally responsible energy solutions. They don't appear to have any sensible place in future sea installations. The UK coastline should not be a dumping-ground for redundant technology.[/p][/quote]What proven tidal energy system?[/p][/quote]La Rance in Brittany, just across the Channel, going since 1966; Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia, Canada, going since 1984; Jingxia, China, since 1985; Sihwa Lake, South Koria, opened in 2011; and a SeaGen system at Strangford Lough since 2008. You don't hear much about them because they just work. MuammarQaddafi
  • Score: 0

1:12pm Mon 7 Jan 13

MuammarQaddafi says...

Morpheus wrote:
Mayan Turkey wrote:
This outdated and inefficient technology being used at sea seems crazy. The UK can lead the way with cutting-edge tidal energy systems - not this outdated, hard to maintain, junk.

Wind farms at sea are an embarrassing step in a journey towards more environmentally responsible energy solutions. They don't appear to have any sensible place in future sea installations.

The UK coastline should not be a dumping-ground for redundant technology.
What proven tidal energy system?
La Rance in Brittany, just across the Channel, going since 1966; Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia, Canada, going since 1984; Jingxia, China, since 1985; Sihwa Lake, South Korea, opened in 2011; and a SeaGen system operating at Strangford Lough since 2008. You don't hear much about them because they just work.
[quote][p][bold]Morpheus[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Mayan Turkey[/bold] wrote: This outdated and inefficient technology being used at sea seems crazy. The UK can lead the way with cutting-edge tidal energy systems - not this outdated, hard to maintain, junk. Wind farms at sea are an embarrassing step in a journey towards more environmentally responsible energy solutions. They don't appear to have any sensible place in future sea installations. The UK coastline should not be a dumping-ground for redundant technology.[/p][/quote]What proven tidal energy system?[/p][/quote]La Rance in Brittany, just across the Channel, going since 1966; Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia, Canada, going since 1984; Jingxia, China, since 1985; Sihwa Lake, South Korea, opened in 2011; and a SeaGen system operating at Strangford Lough since 2008. You don't hear much about them because they just work. MuammarQaddafi
  • Score: 0

1:38pm Mon 7 Jan 13

Hovite says...

You would have thought the amount of energy bashed against the marina arms would provide something if channeled correctly using turbines and tidal technology along them.

The marina is the most obvious place to start a research on sustainable energy in the city and it would just be an unseen add-on rather than a standalone project.
You would have thought the amount of energy bashed against the marina arms would provide something if channeled correctly using turbines and tidal technology along them. The marina is the most obvious place to start a research on sustainable energy in the city and it would just be an unseen add-on rather than a standalone project. Hovite
  • Score: 0

2:09pm Mon 7 Jan 13

Morpheus says...

MuammarQaddafi wrote:
Morpheus wrote:
Mayan Turkey wrote:
This outdated and inefficient technology being used at sea seems crazy. The UK can lead the way with cutting-edge tidal energy systems - not this outdated, hard to maintain, junk.

Wind farms at sea are an embarrassing step in a journey towards more environmentally responsible energy solutions. They don't appear to have any sensible place in future sea installations.

The UK coastline should not be a dumping-ground for redundant technology.
What proven tidal energy system?
La Rance in Brittany, just across the Channel, going since 1966; Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia, Canada, going since 1984; Jingxia, China, since 1985; Sihwa Lake, South Korea, opened in 2011; and a SeaGen system operating at Strangford Lough since 2008. You don't hear much about them because they just work.
They just work at sites that have a high tidal range and these are limited. We have not seen more because they are expensive and also have environmental implications, the Severn Barrage being a typical example. The latest thinking on tidal energy is for using devices at sea that generate energy from the tidal range. None are proven.
[quote][p][bold]MuammarQaddafi[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Morpheus[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Mayan Turkey[/bold] wrote: This outdated and inefficient technology being used at sea seems crazy. The UK can lead the way with cutting-edge tidal energy systems - not this outdated, hard to maintain, junk. Wind farms at sea are an embarrassing step in a journey towards more environmentally responsible energy solutions. They don't appear to have any sensible place in future sea installations. The UK coastline should not be a dumping-ground for redundant technology.[/p][/quote]What proven tidal energy system?[/p][/quote]La Rance in Brittany, just across the Channel, going since 1966; Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia, Canada, going since 1984; Jingxia, China, since 1985; Sihwa Lake, South Korea, opened in 2011; and a SeaGen system operating at Strangford Lough since 2008. You don't hear much about them because they just work.[/p][/quote]They just work at sites that have a high tidal range and these are limited. We have not seen more because they are expensive and also have environmental implications, the Severn Barrage being a typical example. The latest thinking on tidal energy is for using devices at sea that generate energy from the tidal range. None are proven. Morpheus
  • Score: 0

2:11pm Mon 7 Jan 13

Tis I says...

Hovite wrote:
You would have thought the amount of energy bashed against the marina arms would provide something if channeled correctly using turbines and tidal technology along them.

The marina is the most obvious place to start a research on sustainable energy in the city and it would just be an unseen add-on rather than a standalone project.
Lol
[quote][p][bold]Hovite[/bold] wrote: You would have thought the amount of energy bashed against the marina arms would provide something if channeled correctly using turbines and tidal technology along them. The marina is the most obvious place to start a research on sustainable energy in the city and it would just be an unseen add-on rather than a standalone project.[/p][/quote]Lol Tis I
  • Score: 0

6:23pm Mon 7 Jan 13

martyt says...

Morpheus wrote:
MuammarQaddafi wrote:
Morpheus wrote:
Mayan Turkey wrote:
This outdated and inefficient technology being used at sea seems crazy. The UK can lead the way with cutting-edge tidal energy systems - not this outdated, hard to maintain, junk.

Wind farms at sea are an embarrassing step in a journey towards more environmentally responsible energy solutions. They don't appear to have any sensible place in future sea installations.

The UK coastline should not be a dumping-ground for redundant technology.
What proven tidal energy system?
La Rance in Brittany, just across the Channel, going since 1966; Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia, Canada, going since 1984; Jingxia, China, since 1985; Sihwa Lake, South Korea, opened in 2011; and a SeaGen system operating at Strangford Lough since 2008. You don't hear much about them because they just work.
They just work at sites that have a high tidal range and these are limited. We have not seen more because they are expensive and also have environmental implications, the Severn Barrage being a typical example. The latest thinking on tidal energy is for using devices at sea that generate energy from the tidal range. None are proven.
NONE ARE PROVEN ???? SO WHAT ARE YOU JOGGING ON ABOUT CUTTING EDGE TIDAL ENERGY SYSTEMS ,OR DO YOU OWN SHARES IN SOME HAIR BRAIN SCHEME ,YOUR NOT TELLING US ABOUT
[quote][p][bold]Morpheus[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]MuammarQaddafi[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Morpheus[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Mayan Turkey[/bold] wrote: This outdated and inefficient technology being used at sea seems crazy. The UK can lead the way with cutting-edge tidal energy systems - not this outdated, hard to maintain, junk. Wind farms at sea are an embarrassing step in a journey towards more environmentally responsible energy solutions. They don't appear to have any sensible place in future sea installations. The UK coastline should not be a dumping-ground for redundant technology.[/p][/quote]What proven tidal energy system?[/p][/quote]La Rance in Brittany, just across the Channel, going since 1966; Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia, Canada, going since 1984; Jingxia, China, since 1985; Sihwa Lake, South Korea, opened in 2011; and a SeaGen system operating at Strangford Lough since 2008. You don't hear much about them because they just work.[/p][/quote]They just work at sites that have a high tidal range and these are limited. We have not seen more because they are expensive and also have environmental implications, the Severn Barrage being a typical example. The latest thinking on tidal energy is for using devices at sea that generate energy from the tidal range. None are proven.[/p][/quote]NONE ARE PROVEN ???? SO WHAT ARE YOU JOGGING ON ABOUT CUTTING EDGE TIDAL ENERGY SYSTEMS ,OR DO YOU OWN SHARES IN SOME HAIR BRAIN SCHEME ,YOUR NOT TELLING US ABOUT martyt
  • Score: 0

7:28pm Mon 7 Jan 13

Idontbelieveit1948 says...

Morpheus wrote:
MuammarQaddafi wrote:
Morpheus wrote:
Mayan Turkey wrote:
This outdated and inefficient technology being used at sea seems crazy. The UK can lead the way with cutting-edge tidal energy systems - not this outdated, hard to maintain, junk.

Wind farms at sea are an embarrassing step in a journey towards more environmentally responsible energy solutions. They don't appear to have any sensible place in future sea installations.

The UK coastline should not be a dumping-ground for redundant technology.
What proven tidal energy system?
La Rance in Brittany, just across the Channel, going since 1966; Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia, Canada, going since 1984; Jingxia, China, since 1985; Sihwa Lake, South Korea, opened in 2011; and a SeaGen system operating at Strangford Lough since 2008. You don't hear much about them because they just work.
They just work at sites that have a high tidal range and these are limited. We have not seen more because they are expensive and also have environmental implications, the Severn Barrage being a typical example. The latest thinking on tidal energy is for using devices at sea that generate energy from the tidal range. None are proven.
I suppose bl**dy great windmills that rarely turn are proven in your mind are they ?
[quote][p][bold]Morpheus[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]MuammarQaddafi[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Morpheus[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Mayan Turkey[/bold] wrote: This outdated and inefficient technology being used at sea seems crazy. The UK can lead the way with cutting-edge tidal energy systems - not this outdated, hard to maintain, junk. Wind farms at sea are an embarrassing step in a journey towards more environmentally responsible energy solutions. They don't appear to have any sensible place in future sea installations. The UK coastline should not be a dumping-ground for redundant technology.[/p][/quote]What proven tidal energy system?[/p][/quote]La Rance in Brittany, just across the Channel, going since 1966; Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia, Canada, going since 1984; Jingxia, China, since 1985; Sihwa Lake, South Korea, opened in 2011; and a SeaGen system operating at Strangford Lough since 2008. You don't hear much about them because they just work.[/p][/quote]They just work at sites that have a high tidal range and these are limited. We have not seen more because they are expensive and also have environmental implications, the Severn Barrage being a typical example. The latest thinking on tidal energy is for using devices at sea that generate energy from the tidal range. None are proven.[/p][/quote]I suppose bl**dy great windmills that rarely turn are proven in your mind are they ? Idontbelieveit1948
  • Score: 0

10:16pm Mon 7 Jan 13

MuammarQaddafi says...

Morpheus wrote:
MuammarQaddafi wrote:
Morpheus wrote:
Mayan Turkey wrote:
This outdated and inefficient technology being used at sea seems crazy. The UK can lead the way with cutting-edge tidal energy systems - not this outdated, hard to maintain, junk.

Wind farms at sea are an embarrassing step in a journey towards more environmentally responsible energy solutions. They don't appear to have any sensible place in future sea installations.

The UK coastline should not be a dumping-ground for redundant technology.
What proven tidal energy system?
La Rance in Brittany, just across the Channel, going since 1966; Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia, Canada, going since 1984; Jingxia, China, since 1985; Sihwa Lake, South Korea, opened in 2011; and a SeaGen system operating at Strangford Lough since 2008. You don't hear much about them because they just work.
They just work at sites that have a high tidal range and these are limited. We have not seen more because they are expensive and also have environmental implications, the Severn Barrage being a typical example. The latest thinking on tidal energy is for using devices at sea that generate energy from the tidal range. None are proven.
So, technology which has been producing power since the 1960s is "not proven," while 'the latest thinking' for seaborne devices meets with your approbation. You wouldn't happen to be a mate of Al Gore, would you?
[quote][p][bold]Morpheus[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]MuammarQaddafi[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Morpheus[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Mayan Turkey[/bold] wrote: This outdated and inefficient technology being used at sea seems crazy. The UK can lead the way with cutting-edge tidal energy systems - not this outdated, hard to maintain, junk. Wind farms at sea are an embarrassing step in a journey towards more environmentally responsible energy solutions. They don't appear to have any sensible place in future sea installations. The UK coastline should not be a dumping-ground for redundant technology.[/p][/quote]What proven tidal energy system?[/p][/quote]La Rance in Brittany, just across the Channel, going since 1966; Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia, Canada, going since 1984; Jingxia, China, since 1985; Sihwa Lake, South Korea, opened in 2011; and a SeaGen system operating at Strangford Lough since 2008. You don't hear much about them because they just work.[/p][/quote]They just work at sites that have a high tidal range and these are limited. We have not seen more because they are expensive and also have environmental implications, the Severn Barrage being a typical example. The latest thinking on tidal energy is for using devices at sea that generate energy from the tidal range. None are proven.[/p][/quote]So, technology which has been producing power since the 1960s is "not proven," while 'the latest thinking' for seaborne devices meets with your approbation. You wouldn't happen to be a mate of Al Gore, would you? MuammarQaddafi
  • Score: 0

9:34am Tue 8 Jan 13

emordnilap says...

MuammarQaddafi wrote:
Morpheus wrote:
MuammarQaddafi wrote:
Morpheus wrote:
Mayan Turkey wrote:
This outdated and inefficient technology being used at sea seems crazy. The UK can lead the way with cutting-edge tidal energy systems - not this outdated, hard to maintain, junk.

Wind farms at sea are an embarrassing step in a journey towards more environmentally responsible energy solutions. They don't appear to have any sensible place in future sea installations.

The UK coastline should not be a dumping-ground for redundant technology.
What proven tidal energy system?
La Rance in Brittany, just across the Channel, going since 1966; Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia, Canada, going since 1984; Jingxia, China, since 1985; Sihwa Lake, South Korea, opened in 2011; and a SeaGen system operating at Strangford Lough since 2008. You don't hear much about them because they just work.
They just work at sites that have a high tidal range and these are limited. We have not seen more because they are expensive and also have environmental implications, the Severn Barrage being a typical example. The latest thinking on tidal energy is for using devices at sea that generate energy from the tidal range. None are proven.
So, technology which has been producing power since the 1960s is "not proven," while 'the latest thinking' for seaborne devices meets with your approbation. You wouldn't happen to be a mate of Al Gore, would you?
I don't think wind turbines have a places in energy supply either but tidal systems are not the answer either. If you look at the ones mentioned they only supply a tiny fraction of the nation's energy demands. To supply a meaningful amount would take vast constructions around the coast of areas with large tidal ranges. The damage to the environment would be to high a price to pay- imho!

One of the things I never see mentioned in these offshore wind farms is the loss of energy due to the transmission back to land-let alone the whole life environmental costs of building/maintenance
.
If renewables are to feature then we should be have solar collectors- photovoltaics and heat collectors incorporated in all new housing. Adding a couple of thousand pounds to the price of each new house maybe but more than likely saving more than the cost over time. Also the more of these systems produced the more investment into development, and cheaper they would become. They would also produce the power where it would be used.
What is really needed of course is a proper look at the whole area of power supply, storage and usage.
Eg as internet usage increases around the world data storage centers are being built where the biggest problem is getting rid of the heat, all so a lot of pointless data can be stored.... mmmm seems I'm part of that problem!

May be putting the cat amongst the pigeons but for me nuclear is the only answer and the sooner we realise that the better- yes even with Chernobyl and the rest.
[quote][p][bold]MuammarQaddafi[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Morpheus[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]MuammarQaddafi[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Morpheus[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Mayan Turkey[/bold] wrote: This outdated and inefficient technology being used at sea seems crazy. The UK can lead the way with cutting-edge tidal energy systems - not this outdated, hard to maintain, junk. Wind farms at sea are an embarrassing step in a journey towards more environmentally responsible energy solutions. They don't appear to have any sensible place in future sea installations. The UK coastline should not be a dumping-ground for redundant technology.[/p][/quote]What proven tidal energy system?[/p][/quote]La Rance in Brittany, just across the Channel, going since 1966; Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia, Canada, going since 1984; Jingxia, China, since 1985; Sihwa Lake, South Korea, opened in 2011; and a SeaGen system operating at Strangford Lough since 2008. You don't hear much about them because they just work.[/p][/quote]They just work at sites that have a high tidal range and these are limited. We have not seen more because they are expensive and also have environmental implications, the Severn Barrage being a typical example. The latest thinking on tidal energy is for using devices at sea that generate energy from the tidal range. None are proven.[/p][/quote]So, technology which has been producing power since the 1960s is "not proven," while 'the latest thinking' for seaborne devices meets with your approbation. You wouldn't happen to be a mate of Al Gore, would you?[/p][/quote]I don't think wind turbines have a places in energy supply either but tidal systems are not the answer either. If you look at the ones mentioned they only supply a tiny fraction of the nation's energy demands. To supply a meaningful amount would take vast constructions around the coast of areas with large tidal ranges. The damage to the environment would be to high a price to pay- imho! One of the things I never see mentioned in these offshore wind farms is the loss of energy due to the transmission back to land-let alone the whole life environmental costs of building/maintenance . If renewables are to feature then we should be have solar collectors- photovoltaics and heat collectors incorporated in all new housing. Adding a couple of thousand pounds to the price of each new house maybe but more than likely saving more than the cost over time. Also the more of these systems produced the more investment into development, and cheaper they would become. They would also produce the power where it would be used. What is really needed of course is a proper look at the whole area of power supply, storage and usage. Eg as internet usage increases around the world data storage centers are being built where the biggest problem is getting rid of the heat, all so a lot of pointless data can be stored.... mmmm seems I'm part of that problem! May be putting the cat amongst the pigeons but for me nuclear is the only answer and the sooner we realise that the better- yes even with Chernobyl and the rest. emordnilap
  • Score: 0

12:25pm Tue 8 Jan 13

Kiddon72 says...

Call me cynical if you wish but I think it significant that as soon as the Government sends out signals that they are considering reducing the Government contribution toward these projects EON put the whole thing on hold. Perhaps they too hold the view of many that these schemes are not financially vialble unless the Government partially fund them ?
Call me cynical if you wish but I think it significant that as soon as the Government sends out signals that they are considering reducing the Government contribution toward these projects EON put the whole thing on hold. Perhaps they too hold the view of many that these schemes are not financially vialble unless the Government partially fund them ? Kiddon72
  • Score: 0

2:46pm Tue 8 Jan 13

Thumper Hove says...

martyt wrote:
Morpheus wrote:
MuammarQaddafi wrote:
Morpheus wrote:
Mayan Turkey wrote:
This outdated and inefficient technology being used at sea seems crazy. The UK can lead the way with cutting-edge tidal energy systems - not this outdated, hard to maintain, junk.

Wind farms at sea are an embarrassing step in a journey towards more environmentally responsible energy solutions. They don't appear to have any sensible place in future sea installations.

The UK coastline should not be a dumping-ground for redundant technology.
What proven tidal energy system?
La Rance in Brittany, just across the Channel, going since 1966; Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia, Canada, going since 1984; Jingxia, China, since 1985; Sihwa Lake, South Korea, opened in 2011; and a SeaGen system operating at Strangford Lough since 2008. You don't hear much about them because they just work.
They just work at sites that have a high tidal range and these are limited. We have not seen more because they are expensive and also have environmental implications, the Severn Barrage being a typical example. The latest thinking on tidal energy is for using devices at sea that generate energy from the tidal range. None are proven.
NONE ARE PROVEN ???? SO WHAT ARE YOU JOGGING ON ABOUT CUTTING EDGE TIDAL ENERGY SYSTEMS ,OR DO YOU OWN SHARES IN SOME HAIR BRAIN SCHEME ,YOUR NOT TELLING US ABOUT
No need for anyone to 'shout' to other posters simply because they have a different viewpoint to you.
Additionally, you might want to learn how to punctuate and learn the difference between "your" & "you're".
[quote][p][bold]martyt[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Morpheus[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]MuammarQaddafi[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Morpheus[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Mayan Turkey[/bold] wrote: This outdated and inefficient technology being used at sea seems crazy. The UK can lead the way with cutting-edge tidal energy systems - not this outdated, hard to maintain, junk. Wind farms at sea are an embarrassing step in a journey towards more environmentally responsible energy solutions. They don't appear to have any sensible place in future sea installations. The UK coastline should not be a dumping-ground for redundant technology.[/p][/quote]What proven tidal energy system?[/p][/quote]La Rance in Brittany, just across the Channel, going since 1966; Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia, Canada, going since 1984; Jingxia, China, since 1985; Sihwa Lake, South Korea, opened in 2011; and a SeaGen system operating at Strangford Lough since 2008. You don't hear much about them because they just work.[/p][/quote]They just work at sites that have a high tidal range and these are limited. We have not seen more because they are expensive and also have environmental implications, the Severn Barrage being a typical example. The latest thinking on tidal energy is for using devices at sea that generate energy from the tidal range. None are proven.[/p][/quote]NONE ARE PROVEN ???? SO WHAT ARE YOU JOGGING ON ABOUT CUTTING EDGE TIDAL ENERGY SYSTEMS ,OR DO YOU OWN SHARES IN SOME HAIR BRAIN SCHEME ,YOUR NOT TELLING US ABOUT[/p][/quote]No need for anyone to 'shout' to other posters simply because they have a different viewpoint to you. Additionally, you might want to learn how to punctuate and learn the difference between "your" & "you're". Thumper Hove
  • Score: 0

3:11pm Tue 8 Jan 13

Kiddon72 says...

martyt wrote:
Morpheus wrote:
MuammarQaddafi wrote:
Morpheus wrote:
Mayan Turkey wrote: This outdated and inefficient technology being used at sea seems crazy. The UK can lead the way with cutting-edge tidal energy systems - not this outdated, hard to maintain, junk. Wind farms at sea are an embarrassing step in a journey towards more environmentally responsible energy solutions. They don't appear to have any sensible place in future sea installations. The UK coastline should not be a dumping-ground for redundant technology.
What proven tidal energy system?
La Rance in Brittany, just across the Channel, going since 1966; Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia, Canada, going since 1984; Jingxia, China, since 1985; Sihwa Lake, South Korea, opened in 2011; and a SeaGen system operating at Strangford Lough since 2008. You don't hear much about them because they just work.
They just work at sites that have a high tidal range and these are limited. We have not seen more because they are expensive and also have environmental implications, the Severn Barrage being a typical example. The latest thinking on tidal energy is for using devices at sea that generate energy from the tidal range. None are proven.
NONE ARE PROVEN ???? SO WHAT ARE YOU JOGGING ON ABOUT CUTTING EDGE TIDAL ENERGY SYSTEMS ,OR DO YOU OWN SHARES IN SOME HAIR BRAIN SCHEME ,YOUR NOT TELLING US ABOUT
Ah. The good old eco arguement.
If you don't agree with my green point of view I will not listen to you and shout you down.
[quote][p][bold]martyt[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Morpheus[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]MuammarQaddafi[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Morpheus[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Mayan Turkey[/bold] wrote: This outdated and inefficient technology being used at sea seems crazy. The UK can lead the way with cutting-edge tidal energy systems - not this outdated, hard to maintain, junk. Wind farms at sea are an embarrassing step in a journey towards more environmentally responsible energy solutions. They don't appear to have any sensible place in future sea installations. The UK coastline should not be a dumping-ground for redundant technology.[/p][/quote]What proven tidal energy system?[/p][/quote]La Rance in Brittany, just across the Channel, going since 1966; Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia, Canada, going since 1984; Jingxia, China, since 1985; Sihwa Lake, South Korea, opened in 2011; and a SeaGen system operating at Strangford Lough since 2008. You don't hear much about them because they just work.[/p][/quote]They just work at sites that have a high tidal range and these are limited. We have not seen more because they are expensive and also have environmental implications, the Severn Barrage being a typical example. The latest thinking on tidal energy is for using devices at sea that generate energy from the tidal range. None are proven.[/p][/quote]NONE ARE PROVEN ???? SO WHAT ARE YOU JOGGING ON ABOUT CUTTING EDGE TIDAL ENERGY SYSTEMS ,OR DO YOU OWN SHARES IN SOME HAIR BRAIN SCHEME ,YOUR NOT TELLING US ABOUT[/p][/quote]Ah. The good old eco arguement. If you don't agree with my green point of view I will not listen to you and shout you down. Kiddon72
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