The ArgusBrighton and Hove tourism boom (From The Argus)

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Brighton and Hove tourism boom

The Argus: The Brighton Wheel, introduced to attract tourists in 2012 The Brighton Wheel, introduced to attract tourists in 2012

The recession has seen a tourism boom in Brighton and Hove, new figures reveal.

The city is bucking the trend of seaside decline, recording a massive rise in holidaymakers despite the gloomy economic climate.

Brighton and Hove saw an 11% increase in overnight visitors between 2007 and 2011 – sending the number of tourists past the million mark.

This brought an extra £25 million to the economy and created an extra 2,500 tourist jobs.

The council said although no official visitor figures were available yet for 2012, early indications pointed to numbers levelling off but not falling.

Tourism bosses attributed the success of the city’s tourism sector through the recession to a strong programme of events and festivals, successful marketing of the destination, the rise of the staycation and the strength of the Euro which made the UK an attractive location for European travellers.

Tough summer

However, hoteliers warned the city’s tourism industry was struggling after a “disastrous” summer thanks to the Olympics, and business leaders warned that 2013 might not get any easier.

The report, published by Travelodge, using official statistics, today names Brighton and Hove as the UK’s sixth fastest-growing destination ahead of London and seaside rivals Blackpool, Torquay and Newquay which had all seen visitor numbers decline.

Adam Bates, head of city’s tourism body Visit Brighton, said the city can develop a high level of tourist income the whole year through and move away from the traditional summer high and winter off-season.

Hoteliers, however, said the outlook was far from positive, with poor summer months because of the Olympics and wet weather leaving hotels without a war chest to survive the quiet winter months.

Smaller businesses

Mark Jones, of Brighton and Hove Hotels Association, said: “The recession has been anything but positive.

“Rates have plummeted and hoteliers have needed to cut their costs to plan for the future, almost as a matter of survival for smaller businesses.”

Nick Head, of the Sussex Tourism Partnership and the Ambassador Hotel, said that at a Brighton and Hove Hotels Association meeting at the end of 2012, hotel owners were reporting drops in visitor numbers through the summer of up to 30%.

Tony Mernagh, executive director at Brighton and Hove Economic Partnership, said the tourism industry had a bigger impact on the city than merely creating jobs in that industry.

Art and culture

He said: “It supports the cultural and artistic offer of the city which the domestic residents couldn’t sustain alone and that artistic offer makes Brighton an attractive place to start a business.”

Mr Mernagh said the city’s retail sector had also suffered last year and 2013 might not be any better with people adjusting their expectations to lower disposable incomes.

However, as incomes diminished, Mr Mernagh said tourists were becoming more discerning which favoured Brighton and Hove’s broad range of tourist attractions.

Geoffrey Bowden, the chairman of the council’s economic development and culture committee, said without official ONS figures for 2012 it was dangerous to draw any conclusions about last year on just anecdotal evidence.

He added: “It is always good to hear that our city is a popular tourist destination and the latest available data relating to 2011 certainly confirms this.”

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Comments (20)

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1:47pm Tue 15 Jan 13

Hoarder12345444 says...

2011 figures in 2013? Wow they do an efficient job!! So we all know that the 2012 figures will be dire, since the parking charges last April then!
2011 figures in 2013? Wow they do an efficient job!! So we all know that the 2012 figures will be dire, since the parking charges last April then! Hoarder12345444
  • Score: 0

1:56pm Tue 15 Jan 13

Dealing with idiots says...

No doubt Ian Davey will be trotting out the same old guff about shop occupancy which is ancient history stats. £200.000+ hole in parking takings. What about the lost takings of the businesses in the city? Still no sorry from Kitcat and his ragged band. Next electon don't leave it to the students and guilty uppper middle classes
No doubt Ian Davey will be trotting out the same old guff about shop occupancy which is ancient history stats. £200.000+ hole in parking takings. What about the lost takings of the businesses in the city? Still no sorry from Kitcat and his ragged band. Next electon don't leave it to the students and guilty uppper middle classes Dealing with idiots
  • Score: 0

2:39pm Tue 15 Jan 13

Mylex58 says...

This story is incredibly misleading. The headline gives the impression that we're talking about now. Instead, we discover we're talking about the four-year period between 2007-2011. Your reporter Neil Vowles claims that during this period Brighton & Hove saw an 11% increase in overnight visitors - "sending the number of tourists past the million mark." Yes, but was that every year between 2007 and 2011 that more than a million visitors was achieved; or is it a cumulative figure for the whole four-year period? Similarly did it bring an extra £25 million into the local economy every year or over that entire four-year period? And what we really want to know is what happened in 2012? Is there any evidence at all that Brighton & Hove benefited from the London Olympics? And are day-trippers giving us a wide berth because of our high parking charges? It's nice of the Argus to try and put a positive spin on a story to give what would appear to be some uplifting news on a cold January day. But I for one would rather be given the cold, hard facts.
This story is incredibly misleading. The headline gives the impression that we're talking about now. Instead, we discover we're talking about the four-year period between 2007-2011. Your reporter Neil Vowles claims that during this period Brighton & Hove saw an 11% increase in overnight visitors - "sending the number of tourists past the million mark." Yes, but was that every year between 2007 and 2011 that more than a million visitors was achieved; or is it a cumulative figure for the whole four-year period? Similarly did it bring an extra £25 million into the local economy every year or over that entire four-year period? And what we really want to know is what happened in 2012? Is there any evidence at all that Brighton & Hove benefited from the London Olympics? And are day-trippers giving us a wide berth because of our high parking charges? It's nice of the Argus to try and put a positive spin on a story to give what would appear to be some uplifting news on a cold January day. But I for one would rather be given the cold, hard facts. Mylex58
  • Score: 0

3:35pm Tue 15 Jan 13

Surely not! says...

Dealing with idiots wrote:
No doubt Ian Davey will be trotting out the same old guff about shop occupancy which is ancient history stats. £200.000+ hole in parking takings. What about the lost takings of the businesses in the city? Still no sorry from Kitcat and his ragged band. Next electon don't leave it to the students and guilty uppper middle classes
What about that famous petition of yours...?:)
[quote][p][bold]Dealing with idiots[/bold] wrote: No doubt Ian Davey will be trotting out the same old guff about shop occupancy which is ancient history stats. £200.000+ hole in parking takings. What about the lost takings of the businesses in the city? Still no sorry from Kitcat and his ragged band. Next electon don't leave it to the students and guilty uppper middle classes[/p][/quote]What about that famous petition of yours...?:) Surely not!
  • Score: 0

4:03pm Tue 15 Jan 13

Mo.StGrumble says...

Even allowing for the fact that the stats are out of date, how do you know for sure that there was an 11% increase in visitors or that £25m was added to the economy - how on earth were these accurately measured?
Even allowing for the fact that the stats are out of date, how do you know for sure that there was an 11% increase in visitors or that £25m was added to the economy - how on earth were these accurately measured? Mo.StGrumble
  • Score: 0

4:17pm Tue 15 Jan 13

RottingdeanRant says...

An 11% increase over 4 years is nothing to boast about. If fact it is a pretty appalling figure given that the some of this increase simply reflects a population increase.
An 11% increase over 4 years is nothing to boast about. If fact it is a pretty appalling figure given that the some of this increase simply reflects a population increase. RottingdeanRant
  • Score: 0

4:50pm Tue 15 Jan 13

Maxwell's Ghost says...

11 per cent in four years which can easily be wiped out in a single recession year.
The Argus reported last year that the footfall in the city had declined and the same was being reported by the tourism office.
I also know some of the hotel groups have experienced low occupancy levels in 2012 despite the Olympics and Jubilee and one was reported last week to have shut suddenly to become serviced apartments.
As for Torquay and Newquay, have you seen the rail prices to get there and once you are there you really need a car and petrol is so expensive. It's cheaper to fly abroad.
B&H is fortunate to be near London which has a population of 5 million who don't mind paying £45 for a day visit to the seaside.
11 per cent in four years which can easily be wiped out in a single recession year. The Argus reported last year that the footfall in the city had declined and the same was being reported by the tourism office. I also know some of the hotel groups have experienced low occupancy levels in 2012 despite the Olympics and Jubilee and one was reported last week to have shut suddenly to become serviced apartments. As for Torquay and Newquay, have you seen the rail prices to get there and once you are there you really need a car and petrol is so expensive. It's cheaper to fly abroad. B&H is fortunate to be near London which has a population of 5 million who don't mind paying £45 for a day visit to the seaside. Maxwell's Ghost
  • Score: 0

5:13pm Tue 15 Jan 13

Mylex58 says...

Maxwell's Ghost wrote:
11 per cent in four years which can easily be wiped out in a single recession year.
The Argus reported last year that the footfall in the city had declined and the same was being reported by the tourism office.
I also know some of the hotel groups have experienced low occupancy levels in 2012 despite the Olympics and Jubilee and one was reported last week to have shut suddenly to become serviced apartments.
As for Torquay and Newquay, have you seen the rail prices to get there and once you are there you really need a car and petrol is so expensive. It's cheaper to fly abroad.
B&H is fortunate to be near London which has a population of 5 million who don't mind paying £45 for a day visit to the seaside.
Your figures are a bit questionable Maxwell. I don't know when you think London's population last stood at five million? According to the Office of National Statistics, the 2011 census showed London's population as being 8.2 million. And what does your £45 figure relate to? I think that's a very conservative figure. In fact it would be quite interesting to get some views on how much it costs a couple or family from London to spend a summer afternoon in Brighton?
[quote][p][bold]Maxwell's Ghost[/bold] wrote: 11 per cent in four years which can easily be wiped out in a single recession year. The Argus reported last year that the footfall in the city had declined and the same was being reported by the tourism office. I also know some of the hotel groups have experienced low occupancy levels in 2012 despite the Olympics and Jubilee and one was reported last week to have shut suddenly to become serviced apartments. As for Torquay and Newquay, have you seen the rail prices to get there and once you are there you really need a car and petrol is so expensive. It's cheaper to fly abroad. B&H is fortunate to be near London which has a population of 5 million who don't mind paying £45 for a day visit to the seaside.[/p][/quote]Your figures are a bit questionable Maxwell. I don't know when you think London's population last stood at five million? According to the Office of National Statistics, the 2011 census showed London's population as being 8.2 million. And what does your £45 figure relate to? I think that's a very conservative figure. In fact it would be quite interesting to get some views on how much it costs a couple or family from London to spend a summer afternoon in Brighton? Mylex58
  • Score: 0

5:43pm Tue 15 Jan 13

Dealing with idiots says...

Surely not! wrote:
Dealing with idiots wrote: No doubt Ian Davey will be trotting out the same old guff about shop occupancy which is ancient history stats. £200.000+ hole in parking takings. What about the lost takings of the businesses in the city? Still no sorry from Kitcat and his ragged band. Next electon don't leave it to the students and guilty uppper middle classes
What about that famous petition of yours...?:)
You are missing the point councillor. No manipulation of the facts can make up for your poor understanding of how businesss run. In answer to your question, fine thanks. Better than many of the consultation responses you and the green thugs depend on on LOL.
[quote][p][bold]Surely not![/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Dealing with idiots[/bold] wrote: No doubt Ian Davey will be trotting out the same old guff about shop occupancy which is ancient history stats. £200.000+ hole in parking takings. What about the lost takings of the businesses in the city? Still no sorry from Kitcat and his ragged band. Next electon don't leave it to the students and guilty uppper middle classes[/p][/quote]What about that famous petition of yours...?:)[/p][/quote]You are missing the point councillor. No manipulation of the facts can make up for your poor understanding of how businesss run. In answer to your question, fine thanks. Better than many of the consultation responses you and the green thugs depend on on LOL. Dealing with idiots
  • Score: 0

8:44pm Tue 15 Jan 13

Phani Tikkala says...

"The council said although no official visitor figures were available yet for 2012, early indications pointed to numbers levelling off but not falling." says the article.

I don't know who said this, but agenda item 42(b) (a "Notice of Motion" from the conservatives on the impact of parking charges on the local economy) from the Council meeting on 25th October 2012 says:

"“This Council notes with grave concern that visitor numbers in Brighton & Hove fell by 10.8% year on year in the first seven months of 2012"

Anyone care to explain?
"The council said although no official visitor figures were available yet for 2012, early indications pointed to numbers levelling off but not falling." says the article. I don't know who said this, but agenda item 42(b) (a "Notice of Motion" from the conservatives on the impact of parking charges on the local economy) from the Council meeting on 25th October 2012 says: "“This Council notes with grave concern that visitor numbers in Brighton & Hove fell by 10.8% year on year in the first seven months of 2012" Anyone care to explain? Phani Tikkala
  • Score: 0

9:02pm Tue 15 Jan 13

Phani Tikkala says...

Another excerpt from the motion:

"visitor numbers to Brighton & Hove decreased significantly more (over 14%) after the new parking charges were introduced in April"

Instead of "Brighton & Hove Tourist Boom" shouldn't the headline be "Shock fall in tourist numbers"?
Another excerpt from the motion: "visitor numbers to Brighton & Hove decreased significantly more (over 14%) after the new parking charges were introduced in April" Instead of "Brighton & Hove Tourist Boom" shouldn't the headline be "Shock fall in tourist numbers"? Phani Tikkala
  • Score: 0

9:09pm Tue 15 Jan 13

Martha Gunn says...

This is all getting a bit murky and typical of the world of Greenspeak in which we are obliged to live. First can anyone find the original Travelodge report so these figures can be checked? I can find no trace of it.

Second the Green council statement that tourism figures were 'levelling off' stands in dramatic contrast to what they themselves have always said in the past and in blatant contradiction of the opinion of everyone else really in the know.

And as usual not a word from the Green Party apparatchiks who leave hapless Council officers to deal with the flak. Is this quite the most shameful bunch of Councillors we have ever had in our City? No answers - never any willingness to answer.
This is all getting a bit murky and typical of the world of Greenspeak in which we are obliged to live. First can anyone find the original Travelodge report so these figures can be checked? I can find no trace of it. Second the Green council statement that tourism figures were 'levelling off' stands in dramatic contrast to what they themselves have always said in the past and in blatant contradiction of the opinion of everyone else really in the know. And as usual not a word from the Green Party apparatchiks who leave hapless Council officers to deal with the flak. Is this quite the most shameful bunch of Councillors we have ever had in our City? No answers - never any willingness to answer. Martha Gunn
  • Score: 0

10:25pm Tue 15 Jan 13

Bt'n-breezy says...

One of the things that worries me when I go on holiday is whether or not the accomodation's bed is comfortable. It may seem too obvious to mention but sometimes beds can be uncomfortable.
Another other thing I notice is quite often when I go to stay at a chain hotel the decor is to some extent soul-sapping in its mundanity and if they employed an interior designer of flair they would surely make more money.
Perhaps because the era of the car and trains has captured our imagination bus travel has in some respects been left behind. Brighton has a bus station of poor quality which to my mind is very much a lost opprtunity for a tourist town. Are these ideas a replacement for a new big attraction? Perhaps so?
One of the things that worries me when I go on holiday is whether or not the accomodation's bed is comfortable. It may seem too obvious to mention but sometimes beds can be uncomfortable. Another other thing I notice is quite often when I go to stay at a chain hotel the decor is to some extent soul-sapping in its mundanity and if they employed an interior designer of flair they would surely make more money. Perhaps because the era of the car and trains has captured our imagination bus travel has in some respects been left behind. Brighton has a bus station of poor quality which to my mind is very much a lost opprtunity for a tourist town. Are these ideas a replacement for a new big attraction? Perhaps so? Bt'n-breezy
  • Score: 0

11:14pm Tue 15 Jan 13

hubby says...

Looks to me like the Greens are getting things right.
Looks to me like the Greens are getting things right. hubby
  • Score: 0

9:18am Wed 16 Jan 13

Morpheus says...

What a ridiculous report. The figures claiming a tourism boost are out-of-date and it is doom and gloom for 2012 and the future.
What a ridiculous report. The figures claiming a tourism boost are out-of-date and it is doom and gloom for 2012 and the future. Morpheus
  • Score: 0

9:42am Wed 16 Jan 13

Phani Tikkala says...

hubby wrote:
Looks to me like the Greens are getting things right.
An 11% FALL is "getting it right"? Morning Jason!
[quote][p][bold]hubby[/bold] wrote: Looks to me like the Greens are getting things right.[/p][/quote]An 11% FALL is "getting it right"? Morning Jason! Phani Tikkala
  • Score: 0

9:46am Wed 16 Jan 13

Larry the Lamb says...

What tourist boom???
The population for various reasons is increasing as per this clip from ONS
"Buoyed by increased life expectancy, sustained immigration and robust fertility levels, the number of residents jumped 7.1% from 52.4 million in 2001 to 56.1 million in 2011 – the highest growth rate of the past century, said the Office of National Statistics (ONS"
So with that in mind and the fact that Brighton it's self is expanding faster than most towns I don't think it's tourism. We shall see soon any way once the 2012 figures are revealed. Every one is expecting those to be down due to the bad summer oh and the ridiculous seafront parking decision. With such high parking charges charges the Greens are likely to end up in the Brown stuff.
What tourist boom??? The population for various reasons is increasing as per this clip from ONS "Buoyed by increased life expectancy, sustained immigration and robust fertility levels, the number of residents jumped 7.1% from 52.4 million in 2001 to 56.1 million in 2011 – the highest growth rate of the past century, said the Office of National Statistics (ONS" So with that in mind and the fact that Brighton it's self is expanding faster than most towns I don't think it's tourism. We shall see soon any way once the 2012 figures are revealed. Every one is expecting those to be down due to the bad summer oh and the ridiculous seafront parking decision. With such high parking charges charges the Greens are likely to end up in the Brown stuff. Larry the Lamb
  • Score: 0

9:51am Wed 16 Jan 13

Fairfax Sakes says...

A reduction in tourist numbers, via an emphasis of quality over quantity (i.e. less of the working class London rabble, blind drunk overweight hen mobs, etc) would do the town a darn sight of good. Get rid of all those cheap tat seafront haberdashers and kebaberies. An increase in parking for premium seafront spots wouldn't go amiss either.
A reduction in tourist numbers, via an emphasis of quality over quantity (i.e. less of the working class London rabble, blind drunk overweight hen mobs, etc) would do the town a darn sight of good. Get rid of all those cheap tat seafront haberdashers and kebaberies. An increase in parking for premium seafront spots wouldn't go amiss either. Fairfax Sakes
  • Score: 0

10:21am Wed 16 Jan 13

Mylex58 says...

Fairfax Sakes wrote:
A reduction in tourist numbers, via an emphasis of quality over quantity (i.e. less of the working class London rabble, blind drunk overweight hen mobs, etc) would do the town a darn sight of good. Get rid of all those cheap tat seafront haberdashers and kebaberies. An increase in parking for premium seafront spots wouldn't go amiss either.
Most resorts around the world like the idea of attracting high-spending premium visitors. All very well Fairfax to say "get rid of the riff-raff" but, arguably, that's the sort of tourist Brighton has always attracted - and always will. High-spending tourists tend to stay in high-class resorts. And Brighton isn't in that league. Quirky maybe. Quality? No.
[quote][p][bold]Fairfax Sakes[/bold] wrote: A reduction in tourist numbers, via an emphasis of quality over quantity (i.e. less of the working class London rabble, blind drunk overweight hen mobs, etc) would do the town a darn sight of good. Get rid of all those cheap tat seafront haberdashers and kebaberies. An increase in parking for premium seafront spots wouldn't go amiss either.[/p][/quote]Most resorts around the world like the idea of attracting high-spending premium visitors. All very well Fairfax to say "get rid of the riff-raff" but, arguably, that's the sort of tourist Brighton has always attracted - and always will. High-spending tourists tend to stay in high-class resorts. And Brighton isn't in that league. Quirky maybe. Quality? No. Mylex58
  • Score: 0

10:03am Thu 17 Jan 13

Fairfax Sakes says...

Mylex58 wrote:
Fairfax Sakes wrote:
A reduction in tourist numbers, via an emphasis of quality over quantity (i.e. less of the working class London rabble, blind drunk overweight hen mobs, etc) would do the town a darn sight of good. Get rid of all those cheap tat seafront haberdashers and kebaberies. An increase in parking for premium seafront spots wouldn't go amiss either.
Most resorts around the world like the idea of attracting high-spending premium visitors. All very well Fairfax to say "get rid of the riff-raff" but, arguably, that's the sort of tourist Brighton has always attracted - and always will. High-spending tourists tend to stay in high-class resorts. And Brighton isn't in that league. Quirky maybe. Quality? No.
Exactly. Get well rid of riff raff first, then redevelop and remarket Brighton as the destination of choice for the better ones
[quote][p][bold]Mylex58[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Fairfax Sakes[/bold] wrote: A reduction in tourist numbers, via an emphasis of quality over quantity (i.e. less of the working class London rabble, blind drunk overweight hen mobs, etc) would do the town a darn sight of good. Get rid of all those cheap tat seafront haberdashers and kebaberies. An increase in parking for premium seafront spots wouldn't go amiss either.[/p][/quote]Most resorts around the world like the idea of attracting high-spending premium visitors. All very well Fairfax to say "get rid of the riff-raff" but, arguably, that's the sort of tourist Brighton has always attracted - and always will. High-spending tourists tend to stay in high-class resorts. And Brighton isn't in that league. Quirky maybe. Quality? No.[/p][/quote]Exactly. Get well rid of riff raff first, then redevelop and remarket Brighton as the destination of choice for the better ones Fairfax Sakes
  • Score: 0

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