The ArgusRestore Brighton and Hove’s derelict houses to boost economy, survey urges (From The Argus)

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Restore Brighton and Hove’s derelict houses to boost economy, survey urges

Derelict houses in Brighton & Hove should be repaired and refurbished to boost the area’s economy, according to an influential think tank.

The Centre for Cities identified Brighton as one of the cities most likely to deliver its housing targets.

It says the city is below Oxford, London, and Cambridge in housing affordability but above Crawley, Reading and Worthing.

The think tank caused controversy last year when it suggested that Brighton and Hove needed more supermarkets and fewer independent shops.

The survey comes as Brighton and Hove City Council has written to neighbouring authorities - including the South Downs National park - asking for help in building new homes.

Council leader Jason Kitcat said the survey showed that the city could meet its housing needs.

He said: “We have robust plans to meet the housing demands in teh city. That’s why we have brought forward the Toad’s Hole valley scheme. I am confident we can meet our housing targets.”

Alexandra Jones, chief executive of Centre for Cities, said: “This year’s Cities Outlook shows that the housing crisis is one of the most pressing challenges facing the UK’s economy and it can only be addressed if we put place back into national housing policy. Cities must have the freedoms and flexibilities to make decisions about housing policy based on local circumstances. For some cities, lack of housing prevents people accessing jobs or means they are stuck in cramped accommodation. In other cities, incentives to retrofit empty houses could improve local quality of life. Both approaches, adapted to local needs, would generate the jobs and growth the UK needs.

“Cities Outlook 2013 shows that future economic growth will depend on making the most of the untapped potential in UK cities. Policy that can adapt to local needs and greater devolution of powers and funding to cities could be the recipe that the UK economy needs to get back to sustained economic growth.”

Comments (7)

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9:02am Mon 21 Jan 13

Morpheus says...

Who is going to listen to an organisation that thinks lack of housing prevents people getting jobs? Talk about putting the cart before the horse.
Who is going to listen to an organisation that thinks lack of housing prevents people getting jobs? Talk about putting the cart before the horse. Morpheus
  • Score: 0

12:09pm Mon 21 Jan 13

bug eye says...

bizarr when there are already so many unemployed in the city with homes. bizarr also that this council feels it a good use of valuable brownfield sites to be granted permission for private developers to use as student halls, e.g the co-op building and circus st. development. surely students are already well served and happy according to surveys, yet low paid workers struggle to find decent homes and should take priority. the housing waiting list is like the wild west where anybody can go on whether in need or not so this is no judge of the genuine who need social housing, I suspect the list could be slashed by quite a lot if used just for the vulnerable and needy. The council should also be looking to build loft extensions and ground floor extensions on existing housing stock for larger families, and extra floors for use as new flats on existing low rise blocks. this would be cheaper and quickly ease the situation, but that is probably to much like common sense.
bizarr when there are already so many unemployed in the city with homes. bizarr also that this council feels it a good use of valuable brownfield sites to be granted permission for private developers to use as student halls, e.g the co-op building and circus st. development. surely students are already well served and happy according to surveys, yet low paid workers struggle to find decent homes and should take priority. the housing waiting list is like the wild west where anybody can go on whether in need or not so this is no judge of the genuine who need social housing, I suspect the list could be slashed by quite a lot if used just for the vulnerable and needy. The council should also be looking to build loft extensions and ground floor extensions on existing housing stock for larger families, and extra floors for use as new flats on existing low rise blocks. this would be cheaper and quickly ease the situation, but that is probably to much like common sense. bug eye
  • Score: 0

12:42pm Mon 21 Jan 13

Seagulls2 says...

bug eye wrote:
bizarr when there are already so many unemployed in the city with homes. bizarr also that this council feels it a good use of valuable brownfield sites to be granted permission for private developers to use as student halls, e.g the co-op building and circus st. development. surely students are already well served and happy according to surveys, yet low paid workers struggle to find decent homes and should take priority. the housing waiting list is like the wild west where anybody can go on whether in need or not so this is no judge of the genuine who need social housing, I suspect the list could be slashed by quite a lot if used just for the vulnerable and needy. The council should also be looking to build loft extensions and ground floor extensions on existing housing stock for larger families, and extra floors for use as new flats on existing low rise blocks. this would be cheaper and quickly ease the situation, but that is probably to much like common sense.
surely the point about the Student housing schemes is to stop landlords buying up homes as they come onto the market, and stuffing them full of students. Increasing the use of buildings - like the old Co-0p to reduce the demand for "student houses" will leave more tradtional housing for families, or house shares for other young people.
[quote][p][bold]bug eye[/bold] wrote: bizarr when there are already so many unemployed in the city with homes. bizarr also that this council feels it a good use of valuable brownfield sites to be granted permission for private developers to use as student halls, e.g the co-op building and circus st. development. surely students are already well served and happy according to surveys, yet low paid workers struggle to find decent homes and should take priority. the housing waiting list is like the wild west where anybody can go on whether in need or not so this is no judge of the genuine who need social housing, I suspect the list could be slashed by quite a lot if used just for the vulnerable and needy. The council should also be looking to build loft extensions and ground floor extensions on existing housing stock for larger families, and extra floors for use as new flats on existing low rise blocks. this would be cheaper and quickly ease the situation, but that is probably to much like common sense.[/p][/quote]surely the point about the Student housing schemes is to stop landlords buying up homes as they come onto the market, and stuffing them full of students. Increasing the use of buildings - like the old Co-0p to reduce the demand for "student houses" will leave more tradtional housing for families, or house shares for other young people. Seagulls2
  • Score: 0

1:01pm Mon 21 Jan 13

Bob_The_Ferret says...

Desirable though it may be to have derelict properties renovated and lived in, the expenditure to do so is not a 'boost' to the economy, but rather a cost.
Desirable though it may be to have derelict properties renovated and lived in, the expenditure to do so is not a 'boost' to the economy, but rather a cost. Bob_The_Ferret
  • Score: 0

2:41pm Mon 21 Jan 13

george smith says...

Maybe we need something like they had for villages, where children could not afford to live in the village where they were born. We need housing for those who were born in Brighton, universities only take students that they can accommodate themselves.We cannot endlessly keep taking every one who thinks they might like to live here. I might like to live in Knightsbridge, but I cannot afford it, you have to cut your coat according to your cloth.
Maybe we need something like they had for villages, where children could not afford to live in the village where they were born. We need housing for those who were born in Brighton, universities only take students that they can accommodate themselves.We cannot endlessly keep taking every one who thinks they might like to live here. I might like to live in Knightsbridge, but I cannot afford it, you have to cut your coat according to your cloth. george smith
  • Score: 0

7:52pm Mon 21 Jan 13

Maxwell's Ghost says...

Students are now paying £27,000 for an average degree course and that does not include rent and bills.
The move to serviced student halls with bills all-in rather than living in student houses where landlords make them sign into an unnecessary ten month contract and where they have no control over utility bills is going to be a thing of the past. Offering clean, warm, serviced accommodation in city centres with a set fee is proving very popular and will offer unis the opportunity to offer study/accommodation packages.
There are some cracking student flats going up in Elm Grove on the site of an old pub.
This frees up houses for families to rent or the council to rent for families.
When you get long term tenants in communities, you tend to get a stronger community where people unite to clear roads of snow, help each other out, look out for old folk instead of row after row of run down houses with bags of litter outside and scrappy curtains hanging in windows.
Students landlords slaughtered the golden goose and only have themselves to blame for palming off poor accommodation on students and also failing to manage houses and leaving neighbours to deal with anti-social behaviour and filth.
You made your bed bug eye and will now have to rent to families who will expect a better standard.
Students are now paying £27,000 for an average degree course and that does not include rent and bills. The move to serviced student halls with bills all-in rather than living in student houses where landlords make them sign into an unnecessary ten month contract and where they have no control over utility bills is going to be a thing of the past. Offering clean, warm, serviced accommodation in city centres with a set fee is proving very popular and will offer unis the opportunity to offer study/accommodation packages. There are some cracking student flats going up in Elm Grove on the site of an old pub. This frees up houses for families to rent or the council to rent for families. When you get long term tenants in communities, you tend to get a stronger community where people unite to clear roads of snow, help each other out, look out for old folk instead of row after row of run down houses with bags of litter outside and scrappy curtains hanging in windows. Students landlords slaughtered the golden goose and only have themselves to blame for palming off poor accommodation on students and also failing to manage houses and leaving neighbours to deal with anti-social behaviour and filth. You made your bed bug eye and will now have to rent to families who will expect a better standard. Maxwell's Ghost
  • Score: 0

8:25pm Tue 29 Jan 13

The Reader says...

"Council leader Jason Kitcat said the survey showed that the city could meet its housing needs."

I thought there were over 10,000 peole on the waiting list, are there really 10,000 empty houses?
"Council leader Jason Kitcat said the survey showed that the city could meet its housing needs." I thought there were over 10,000 peole on the waiting list, are there really 10,000 empty houses? The Reader
  • Score: 0

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