The ArgusPolice to look into Brighton University report on kettling at protests (From The Argus)

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Police to look into Brighton University report on kettling at protests

Senior police officers are to look at a report into kettling to see if the force should change its tactics for dealing with protests.

Research from the University of Brighton suggests forcing crowds together and then charging them can make protesters more violent.

Dr Chris Cocking interviewed 20 people involved in student tuition fee protests in Brighton in 2010.

Liaison Chief Inspector Jim Bartlett, of Sussex Police, said the force had co-operated with the research.

He said: “Since this research was conducted in 2010, we have continually reviewed our approach to policing protests and other large events.

“We have responded to a new national best practice and, significantly, last year introduced a new liaison officer role to improve dialogue between police and protesters.

“This has a positive impact on how we can plan for events and helps achieve a ‘no surprises’ approach to policing on the day.

“We will now fully consider this latest research and would welcome another visit from its authors to further discuss our approach.”

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Comments (7)

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8:34pm Fri 25 Jan 13

Serf says...

If protests are peaceful then the police should not use the kettling procedure. If this procedure is used without good cause then freedom of speech is at risk.
Before I am accused of being a member of the great unwashed and benefit scrounger, I will put this straight. I am 67 years of age. I have worked hard all my life. I have been in the army and also spent 5 years in the Kent Police. I do not always agree with protesters, but I do believe in free speech. Without this we do not have a democracy.
If protests are peaceful then the police should not use the kettling procedure. If this procedure is used without good cause then freedom of speech is at risk. Before I am accused of being a member of the great unwashed and benefit scrounger, I will put this straight. I am 67 years of age. I have worked hard all my life. I have been in the army and also spent 5 years in the Kent Police. I do not always agree with protesters, but I do believe in free speech. Without this we do not have a democracy. Serf
  • Score: 0

8:49pm Fri 25 Jan 13

Somethingsarejustwrong says...

Agree and conversely if they are not peaceful the again kettling should not be used;instead water cannon and truncheons would seem appropriate
Agree and conversely if they are not peaceful the again kettling should not be used;instead water cannon and truncheons would seem appropriate Somethingsarejustwrong
  • Score: 0

10:02pm Fri 25 Jan 13

Martha Gunn says...

Kettling - yet another neologism without meaning, content or explanation. But by repeating it constantly opponents of the police hope it will take root.

Cocking's research seems to be rather more robust than some of the other rubbish about student demonstrations that has emerged from the University of Brighton. But still reverts to the invention of 'kettling'.
Kettling - yet another neologism without meaning, content or explanation. But by repeating it constantly opponents of the police hope it will take root. Cocking's research seems to be rather more robust than some of the other rubbish about student demonstrations that has emerged from the University of Brighton. But still reverts to the invention of 'kettling'. Martha Gunn
  • Score: 0

11:23pm Fri 25 Jan 13

greenpaws says...

The police say they want a "non surprises" approach. It is not for the police to decide what form a protest should take, but to ensure we are all safe.

People have a right to be surprising. The police should keep the peace and stop asking for plans in advances to then try and get someone to take legal responsibility.

It should not be about individuals but groups of people coming out to be heard.

The people are the last bastion of democracy against corrupt governance and all in the country should be held to account, and if it takes the people to do that and not the government, then so be it.
The police say they want a "non surprises" approach. It is not for the police to decide what form a protest should take, but to ensure we are all safe. People have a right to be surprising. The police should keep the peace and stop asking for plans in advances to then try and get someone to take legal responsibility. It should not be about individuals but groups of people coming out to be heard. The people are the last bastion of democracy against corrupt governance and all in the country should be held to account, and if it takes the people to do that and not the government, then so be it. greenpaws
  • Score: 0

12:16am Sat 26 Jan 13

PorkBoat says...

Turn the hoses on them!
Turn the hoses on them! PorkBoat
  • Score: 0

12:37am Sat 26 Jan 13

Martha Gunn says...

greenpaws wrote:
The police say they want a "non surprises" approach. It is not for the police to decide what form a protest should take, but to ensure we are all safe.

People have a right to be surprising. The police should keep the peace and stop asking for plans in advances to then try and get someone to take legal responsibility.

It should not be about individuals but groups of people coming out to be heard.

The people are the last bastion of democracy against corrupt governance and all in the country should be held to account, and if it takes the people to do that and not the government, then so be it.
Any chance of this comment being available in translation to English in the near future? The Paws Person is clearly afflicted with Greenspeak and needs an interpreter.

We must keep constantly vigilant in order to combat Greenthink and its instrument Greenspeak. Down with Big Green KitBrother!
[quote][p][bold]greenpaws[/bold] wrote: The police say they want a "non surprises" approach. It is not for the police to decide what form a protest should take, but to ensure we are all safe. People have a right to be surprising. The police should keep the peace and stop asking for plans in advances to then try and get someone to take legal responsibility. It should not be about individuals but groups of people coming out to be heard. The people are the last bastion of democracy against corrupt governance and all in the country should be held to account, and if it takes the people to do that and not the government, then so be it.[/p][/quote]Any chance of this comment being available in translation to English in the near future? The Paws Person is clearly afflicted with Greenspeak and needs an interpreter. We must keep constantly vigilant in order to combat Greenthink and its instrument Greenspeak. Down with Big Green KitBrother! Martha Gunn
  • Score: 0

4:06pm Sun 27 Jan 13

chris cocking says...

As the author of the article that is mentioned in this story, I would like to point out that I was not contacted by the Argus before the story appeared in print and want to make a few corrections and/or clarifications about my research. I would be grateful if the Argus could acknowledge these mistakes.

1) My research looked at people who had experienced police charges (either on horseback or foot), and not 'kettling' as stated in the article, (which has similar psychological effects to charges, but has been looked at in previous academic research).

2) The story implies that I worked with Sussex police to do this research, which is untrue. I had no contact with Sussex Police when conducting the research, and have never met the officer named in the story (Chief Inspector Bartlett). I think there has been some confusion with my research and another academic (Professor Cliff Stott) who advised Sussex Police in their implementation of the Police Liaison Officers that CI Bartlett refers to.

A link to the article covered in the story, and to my web-log (which looks at my research into crowd behaviour in general) follow below;

Chris Cocking,
University of Brighton

http://onlinelibrary
.wiley.com/doi/10.10
02/jip.1389/abstract


http://dontpaniccorr
ectingmythsaboutthec
rowd.blogspot.co.uk/
As the author of the article that is mentioned in this story, I would like to point out that I was not contacted by the Argus before the story appeared in print and want to make a few corrections and/or clarifications about my research. I would be grateful if the Argus could acknowledge these mistakes. 1) My research looked at people who had experienced police charges (either on horseback or foot), and not 'kettling' as stated in the article, (which has similar psychological effects to charges, but has been looked at in previous academic research). 2) The story implies that I worked with Sussex police to do this research, which is untrue. I had no contact with Sussex Police when conducting the research, and have never met the officer named in the story (Chief Inspector Bartlett). I think there has been some confusion with my research and another academic (Professor Cliff Stott) who advised Sussex Police in their implementation of the Police Liaison Officers that CI Bartlett refers to. A link to the article covered in the story, and to my web-log (which looks at my research into crowd behaviour in general) follow below; Chris Cocking, University of Brighton http://onlinelibrary .wiley.com/doi/10.10 02/jip.1389/abstract http://dontpaniccorr ectingmythsaboutthec rowd.blogspot.co.uk/ chris cocking
  • Score: 0

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