The ArgusBedroom tax bombshell (From The Argus)

Get involved: Send your news, views, pictures and video by texting SUPIC to 80360 or email us.

Welfare reforms will drive Brighton and Hove's poorest 'over the edge'

The Argus: There is a shortage of smaller homes in Brighton and Hove's social housing stock There is a shortage of smaller homes in Brighton and Hove's social housing stock

Charities and city leaders claim upcoming government reforms will drive the poorest families in Brighton and Hove “over the edge”. The reforms, dubbed the “bedroom tax”, will force social tenants to move out or face slashed benefits if they have a spare room. Bill Gardner assesses the potential impact of the bedroom tax bombshell.

Disabled people are being driven to the brink of suicide by the upcoming bedroom tax, it has been claimed.

From April, hundreds of social housing tenants across Brighton and Hove deemed to have a spare bedroom will be forced to move out or face a cut in benefits.

Those affected will lose an average of £14 a week with housing association tenants expected to lose £16 a week.

Brighton and Hove City Council has already written to nearly 1,600 households warning them they are likely to lose out.

One Conservative MP said the changes would ensure houses were not under-occupied and would help cut the bloated welfare bill.

But furious campaigners claimed vulnerable disabled people would be hit hardest.

A spokeswoman for the Fed Centre, a Brighton-based disabled charity, said the reforms were “deeply concerning”.

She said: “We have had people contact us who are frightened of losing their homes. For some people it is so stressful that it is affecting their health - and some have reported feeling suicidal.

“It has been estimated that two thirds of tenants affected will be disabled people, many of whom are very vulnerable.”

The Argus spoke to one woman who has lived in her three bedroom house with her daughter and husband for 20 years.

Both the mother and her daughter are disabled, with the father needing to sleep in a separate room.

'Ridiculous'

Now they have been told they have to make a contribution to their rent which they cannot afford, or they will have to leave their home.

Chris Kift, from the Brighton and Hove Tenant Disability Network, described the bedroom tax as “utterly ridiculous”.

He said: “A spare room is an essential part of life for many disabled people.

“The fact is you do sometimes need a carer to stay over even if they are not there permanently.

“Disabled people are being targeted and it’s not fair. They’re attacking the people who can’t fight back.”

Waiting list

The reforms are aimed at forcing social tenants to downsize if they have bedrooms deemed ‘spare’.

However, Brighton and Hove has a huge housing waiting list, with many people waiting years to access a one-bedroom flat.

Andy Winter, chief executive of the Brighton Housing Trust, the largest housing charity in the city, said the bedroom tax could push hard-pressed families “over the edge”.

He said: “I really don’t think this has been thought through.

“People are already on a financial precipice and there are a number of households which will be pushed into a crisis situation.

“There are a lot of families that will be affected by this and it’s possible that there could be evictions.”

Creating harm

Jason Kitcat, the Green leader of Brighton and Hove City Council, said the reforms were “poorly conceived and deeply unfair”.

He said the council had already set aside more than £300,000 in the budget to support those who fell foul of the rule change.

He said: “It’s certainly going to create a lot of harm and difficulty for people.

“The money that’s going to be needed to be spent supporting people will nullify whatever’s raised by the Government, so it simply doesn’t make sense.”

Other politicians agreed the bedroom tax could cause huge damage to the city.

Stark choices

Gill Mitchell, leader of the Labour group on Brighton and Hove City Council, said the rule change could “tear communities apart”.

She said: “People are going to be faced with a stark choice between finding more money or moving.

“I represent a ward that is going to be hit hard by this. It’s going to cause a huge amount of damage to people’s lives.

“For instance, I’ve spoken to a man who has his kids to stay once a week after his divorce settlement.

“But when this rule kicks in, he will no longer be able to do that. He will have to move out. It’s deeply unfair.”

MPs support

But the bedroom tax is supported by Brighton and Hove’s two Conservative MPs – Kemptown MP Simon Kirby and Hove MP Mike Weatherley.

Mr Weatherly said the bedroom tax was “fair and completely reasonable”.

He said: “The welfare bill has simply got to be cut and this is one way to do that.

“I don’t see why a hard-working family should be paying more for another person to live in a house that is too big for them.

“I sympathise with anyone who will need to move their kids from one school to another. But the taxpayer can’t foot the bill for whatever people want to do – and there are a number of exemptions.

“Welfare is there to stop people being hungry and to keep a roof over their heads, not to allow them to do whatever they like.”

How it works

Welfare reforms will cut the amount of benefit that people can get if they are deemed to have a spare bedroom in their council or housing association home.

The new rules will apply from April to tenants of working age.

The size criteria in the social rented sector will restrict housing benefit to allow for one bedroom for each person or couple living as part of the household, with the following exceptions:

  • Children under 16 of same gender expected to share
  • Children under 10 expected to share regardless of gender
  • Disabled tenant or partner who needs non resident overnight carer will be allowed an extra bedroom.

All claimants who are deemed to have at least one spare bedroom will be affected.

This includes:

  • Separated parents who share the care of their children and who may have been allocated an extra bedroom to reflect this.
  • Couples who use their ‘spare’ bedroom when recovering from an illness or operation
  • Foster carers because foster children are not counted as part of the household for benefit purposes
  • Parents whose children visit but are not part of the household
  • Families with disabled children
  • Disabled people including people living in adapted or specially designed properties.

The cut will be set at 14% housing benefit for one extra bedroom and 25% for two or more extra bedrooms.

‘There are people that have been on a waiting list to downsize for years but they can’t because there’s nothing available’

The Argus: Stewart Grover

Many disabled people claim the bedroom tax would force them to move out of their homes.

Stewart Gover’s wife is a chronic asthmatic, meaning the couple have to sleep in separate rooms due to her constant coughing.

But from April, Mr Gover, pictured above, from Brighton will lose more than £700 a year due to the bedroom tax.

He said: “I don’t think there’s any justification for it. It’s not just us - there will be thousands of people affected.

“It just seems like no one has bothered to think this through.”

Mr Gover, a former tenant rep who is registered disabled himself, said it would be difficult to find a one-bedroom council flat in Brighton.

He said: “There are people that have been on a waiting list to downsize for years but they can’t because there’s nothing available.

“And the one bedroom stock is the worst in the city. It’s just unbelievably unfair.”

‘I’d like to see the Prime Minister try to bring up a family of four on £80 a week’

The Argus: Muriel Briault

Muriel Briault, pictured, a tenant rep for Mile Oak in Portslade, said hundreds of families would suffer due to the bedroom tax.

She said: “People around here are already living on the breadline. I just don’t know how they are going to survive.

“I think many people have a right to a spare room so they can have family and friends to stay. It’s appalling.

“I’d like to see David Cameron try to bring up a family of four on £80 a week.”

See the latest news headlines from The Argus:

More news from The Argus

Follow @brightonargus

The Argus: Daily Echo on Facebook - facebook.com/southerndailyecho Like us on Facebook

The Argus: Google+ Add us to your circles on Google+

Comments (25)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

1:55pm Tue 5 Feb 13

mark by the sea says...

Excellent news, I hope the changes only count for those not willing to down size? Of course there will be stories about disabled people missing out etc, but the rule is for the good of the country, we can't keep spending millions on people having a spare room or two, with homeless families needing suitable places. I would like to see the council offer incentives either free rent periods for people prepared to move into smaller properties, this rule will onlyy affect those on benefits .
Excellent news, I hope the changes only count for those not willing to down size? Of course there will be stories about disabled people missing out etc, but the rule is for the good of the country, we can't keep spending millions on people having a spare room or two, with homeless families needing suitable places. I would like to see the council offer incentives either free rent periods for people prepared to move into smaller properties, this rule will onlyy affect those on benefits . mark by the sea
  • Score: 0

2:09pm Tue 5 Feb 13

charlie smirke says...

I can see why they are trying to do this but what is the point, if there are no other smaller properties available for them to move to?
I can see why they are trying to do this but what is the point, if there are no other smaller properties available for them to move to? charlie smirke
  • Score: 0

2:12pm Tue 5 Feb 13

lonegull says...

Seems a sensible move.
Like any legislation may be some unexpected losers but on balance it has to be a good thing.

Many kids with both parents working have to share a room because their parents can't afford a larger property so hardly seems fair if their taxes are then used to provide others with rooms they don't need.
Seems a sensible move. Like any legislation may be some unexpected losers but on balance it has to be a good thing. Many kids with both parents working have to share a room because their parents can't afford a larger property so hardly seems fair if their taxes are then used to provide others with rooms they don't need. lonegull
  • Score: 0

2:14pm Tue 5 Feb 13

Sarah Booker Lewis says...

My grandmother lives in social housing in Adur. She is 88-years-old and has lived in the same house since 1959, she used to live over the road from 1947-59.

My family think she should move into a retirement flat or sheltered housing to free up her three-bedroomed house for a family. However, she refuses to move from the home where my mother and uncle grew up and where my grandfather died.

She says she doesn't want to go into an old people's home, because that's how she views social housing. How can you get someone like her to move?
My grandmother lives in social housing in Adur. She is 88-years-old and has lived in the same house since 1959, she used to live over the road from 1947-59. My family think she should move into a retirement flat or sheltered housing to free up her three-bedroomed house for a family. However, she refuses to move from the home where my mother and uncle grew up and where my grandfather died. She says she doesn't want to go into an old people's home, because that's how she views social housing. How can you get someone like her to move? Sarah Booker Lewis
  • Score: 0

2:16pm Tue 5 Feb 13

AS-Kemptown says...

If the two Conservative MPs think it is "fair and completely reasonable", why are Pensioners exempt? We have pensioners rattling around in 3, 4 and 5 bedroom houses that are needed by families. They are not affected. Meanwhile disabled and sick are once again penalised by having a room that is necessary for their condition. This is not a fair "tax".
If Jason Kitcat feels it is a “poorly conceived and deeply unfair”, then he and the rest of the Council has the opportunity not to impose it just as some other Councils have.
If the two Conservative MPs think it is "fair and completely reasonable", why are Pensioners exempt? We have pensioners rattling around in 3, 4 and 5 bedroom houses that are needed by families. They are not affected. Meanwhile disabled and sick are once again penalised by having a room that is necessary for their condition. This is not a fair "tax". If Jason Kitcat feels it is a “poorly conceived and deeply unfair”, then he and the rest of the Council has the opportunity not to impose it just as some other Councils have. AS-Kemptown
  • Score: 0

2:35pm Tue 5 Feb 13

Kawasaki998 says...

I worked with the District Nurses and visited homes. There were many people who on their own lived in 2 or 3 bedroom houses or flats. A lot of elderly only used their Lounge and closed off the upstair rooms. We should not have to pay for people on benefits a home bigger than they need. But if there is no where else for them to move to then if they have tried to move then fair enough they should not be charged.
I worked with the District Nurses and visited homes. There were many people who on their own lived in 2 or 3 bedroom houses or flats. A lot of elderly only used their Lounge and closed off the upstair rooms. We should not have to pay for people on benefits a home bigger than they need. But if there is no where else for them to move to then if they have tried to move then fair enough they should not be charged. Kawasaki998
  • Score: 0

2:49pm Tue 5 Feb 13

pokesdown1 says...

Most grandmothers are not of working age.
Most grandmothers are not of working age. pokesdown1
  • Score: 0

3:46pm Tue 5 Feb 13

badenroad says...

‘I’d like to see the Prime Minister try to bring up a family of four on £80 a week’

It occurs to me that he doesn't have to do this as he has a job..
‘I’d like to see the Prime Minister try to bring up a family of four on £80 a week’ It occurs to me that he doesn't have to do this as he has a job.. badenroad
  • Score: 0

3:56pm Tue 5 Feb 13

Hovelady says...

I appreciate it's sad for someone who has lived in a property for a long time and has a lot of memories attached but it is not THEIR house. It is a benefit provided at a time of need, and if you don't need it any more, you shouldn't have it.

I am very much in favour of the welfare system and social housing in particular, but it should only be for the most needy.

It's a ridiculous situation that there are single occupants in 2/3/4 bedroom properties, but also the issue of occupants whose financial situations have improved significantly and therefore wouldn't necessarily struggle to pay private rent needs to be addressed too.

It seems to me that if you are lucky enough to get a council flat/house in the first place, you are set for life - you'll either buy it way under market value with a huge discount or you'll stay there for life paying minimal rent and costing you nothing for maintenance or repairs, the result being fewer and fewer properties being freed up. Without more houses being built, something needs to be done to free up properties to those truly in need.

....But I don't think it would be fair for anyone who IS prepared to downsize to have benefit cut whilst there are no smaller properties available for them to transfer to.
I appreciate it's sad for someone who has lived in a property for a long time and has a lot of memories attached but it is not THEIR house. It is a benefit provided at a time of need, and if you don't need it any more, you shouldn't have it. I am very much in favour of the welfare system and social housing in particular, but it should only be for the most needy. It's a ridiculous situation that there are single occupants in 2/3/4 bedroom properties, but also the issue of occupants whose financial situations have improved significantly and therefore wouldn't necessarily struggle to pay private rent needs to be addressed too. It seems to me that if you are lucky enough to get a council flat/house in the first place, you are set for life - you'll either buy it way under market value with a huge discount or you'll stay there for life paying minimal rent and costing you nothing for maintenance or repairs, the result being fewer and fewer properties being freed up. Without more houses being built, something needs to be done to free up properties to those truly in need. ....But I don't think it would be fair for anyone who IS prepared to downsize to have benefit cut whilst there are no smaller properties available for them to transfer to. Hovelady
  • Score: 0

3:58pm Tue 5 Feb 13

saraman says...

badenroad wrote:
‘I’d like to see the Prime Minister try to bring up a family of four on £80 a week’ It occurs to me that he doesn't have to do this as he has a job..
That's a different story Badenroad. Why have four kids if you can't afford to to support them. I would like a RR car but I can't afford it. If people in social housing have more bedrooms than they need they should be made to move. It's us the tax payer that is picking up the bill. I'm just downright fed up with the something for nothing culture.
[quote][p][bold]badenroad[/bold] wrote: ‘I’d like to see the Prime Minister try to bring up a family of four on £80 a week’ It occurs to me that he doesn't have to do this as he has a job..[/p][/quote]That's a different story Badenroad. Why have four kids if you can't afford to to support them. I would like a RR car but I can't afford it. If people in social housing have more bedrooms than they need they should be made to move. It's us the tax payer that is picking up the bill. I'm just downright fed up with the something for nothing culture. saraman
  • Score: 0

4:09pm Tue 5 Feb 13

lorrie1 says...

badenroad wrote:
‘I’d like to see the Prime Minister try to bring up a family of four on £80 a week’ It occurs to me that he doesn't have to do this as he has a job..
Yeah, his JOB is to make everyone elses life a misery. This goverment is beyond a joke!
[quote][p][bold]badenroad[/bold] wrote: ‘I’d like to see the Prime Minister try to bring up a family of four on £80 a week’ It occurs to me that he doesn't have to do this as he has a job..[/p][/quote]Yeah, his JOB is to make everyone elses life a misery. This goverment is beyond a joke! lorrie1
  • Score: 0

4:18pm Tue 5 Feb 13

a person says...

If someone is disabled or has a chronic illness,
then I do think it is reasonable to expect their partner to sleep in a different room. That way they both get a better nights sleep .
I do not agree that someone needs a spare room for children to come and stay.
We are not on benefits .
If my child comes to stay for the weekend ,she sleeps on an airbed in the lounge.
Like many of her friends do when they visit their parents.
If someone is disabled or has a chronic illness, then I do think it is reasonable to expect their partner to sleep in a different room. That way they both get a better nights sleep . I do not agree that someone needs a spare room for children to come and stay. We are not on benefits . If my child comes to stay for the weekend ,she sleeps on an airbed in the lounge. Like many of her friends do when they visit their parents. a person
  • Score: 0

4:35pm Tue 5 Feb 13

Andy R says...

Tom Lehrer was wrong. It's only now that we can say that satire is truly dead....when "anti-squatting crusader" Mike Weatherly supports a measure that could actually cause homelessness.

Has he or Kirby bothered to undertake even the most elementary research on this bright idea? Or have they just swallowed whole the line spun by Duncan-Smith and Pickles?
Tom Lehrer was wrong. It's only now that we can say that satire is truly dead....when "anti-squatting crusader" Mike Weatherly supports a measure that could actually cause homelessness. Has he or Kirby bothered to undertake even the most elementary research on this bright idea? Or have they just swallowed whole the line spun by Duncan-Smith and Pickles? Andy R
  • Score: 0

4:44pm Tue 5 Feb 13

Andy R says...

AS-Kemptown wrote:
If the two Conservative MPs think it is "fair and completely reasonable", why are Pensioners exempt? We have pensioners rattling around in 3, 4 and 5 bedroom houses that are needed by families. They are not affected. Meanwhile disabled and sick are once again penalised by having a room that is necessary for their condition. This is not a fair "tax". If Jason Kitcat feels it is a “poorly conceived and deeply unfair”, then he and the rest of the Council has the opportunity not to impose it just as some other Councils have.
What do you mean "opportunity not to impose it"? True he could refuse to impose it, but he'd be in breach of the law if he did. I know of no Council which is not imposing it.

I think you're confusing it with the new council tax reduction scheme, whereby a council can "choose" not to impose cuts if they can meet the funding shortfall.
[quote][p][bold]AS-Kemptown[/bold] wrote: If the two Conservative MPs think it is "fair and completely reasonable", why are Pensioners exempt? We have pensioners rattling around in 3, 4 and 5 bedroom houses that are needed by families. They are not affected. Meanwhile disabled and sick are once again penalised by having a room that is necessary for their condition. This is not a fair "tax". If Jason Kitcat feels it is a “poorly conceived and deeply unfair”, then he and the rest of the Council has the opportunity not to impose it just as some other Councils have.[/p][/quote]What do you mean "opportunity not to impose it"? True he could refuse to impose it, but he'd be in breach of the law if he did. I know of no Council which is not imposing it. I think you're confusing it with the new council tax reduction scheme, whereby a council can "choose" not to impose cuts if they can meet the funding shortfall. Andy R
  • Score: 0

4:47pm Tue 5 Feb 13

Andy R says...

...Oh....and pensioners are exempt because pensioners VOTE!
...Oh....and pensioners are exempt because pensioners VOTE! Andy R
  • Score: 0

5:12pm Tue 5 Feb 13

rayellerton says...

Sarah Booker Lewis wrote:
My grandmother lives in social housing in Adur. She is 88-years-old and has lived in the same house since 1959, she used to live over the road from 1947-59.

My family think she should move into a retirement flat or sheltered housing to free up her three-bedroomed house for a family. However, she refuses to move from the home where my mother and uncle grew up and where my grandfather died.

She says she doesn't want to go into an old people's home, because that's how she views social housing. How can you get someone like her to move?
It only applies to tenants of working age..
[quote][p][bold]Sarah Booker Lewis[/bold] wrote: My grandmother lives in social housing in Adur. She is 88-years-old and has lived in the same house since 1959, she used to live over the road from 1947-59. My family think she should move into a retirement flat or sheltered housing to free up her three-bedroomed house for a family. However, she refuses to move from the home where my mother and uncle grew up and where my grandfather died. She says she doesn't want to go into an old people's home, because that's how she views social housing. How can you get someone like her to move?[/p][/quote]It only applies to tenants of working age.. rayellerton
  • Score: 0

5:17pm Tue 5 Feb 13

saraman says...

Again it looks like the Argus is muddying the waters with its headline. That is, the poor and accommodation in this case do not go hand in hand. If poor people are living in accommodation with excess bedrooms it would make sense to move them to a smaller one whereby at the very least their heating and decorating bills would be reduced. Also their council tax would be less, therefore all round they would be better off. Or are they receiving benefit for all of that as well?
Again it looks like the Argus is muddying the waters with its headline. That is, the poor and accommodation in this case do not go hand in hand. If poor people are living in accommodation with excess bedrooms it would make sense to move them to a smaller one whereby at the very least their heating and decorating bills would be reduced. Also their council tax would be less, therefore all round they would be better off. Or are they receiving benefit for all of that as well? saraman
  • Score: 0

6:02pm Tue 5 Feb 13

leobrighton says...

Sarah Booker Lewis wrote:
My grandmother lives in social housing in Adur. She is 88-years-old and has lived in the same house since 1959, she used to live over the road from 1947-59.

My family think she should move into a retirement flat or sheltered housing to free up her three-bedroomed house for a family. However, she refuses to move from the home where my mother and uncle grew up and where my grandfather died.

She says she doesn't want to go into an old people's home, because that's how she views social housing. How can you get someone like her to move?
Get her to buy the house. Lend her the money if need be, she will only have to pay a fraction of the market value. If she doesn't you will regret it. Stop trying to get her to move its wrong.
[quote][p][bold]Sarah Booker Lewis[/bold] wrote: My grandmother lives in social housing in Adur. She is 88-years-old and has lived in the same house since 1959, she used to live over the road from 1947-59. My family think she should move into a retirement flat or sheltered housing to free up her three-bedroomed house for a family. However, she refuses to move from the home where my mother and uncle grew up and where my grandfather died. She says she doesn't want to go into an old people's home, because that's how she views social housing. How can you get someone like her to move?[/p][/quote]Get her to buy the house. Lend her the money if need be, she will only have to pay a fraction of the market value. If she doesn't you will regret it. Stop trying to get her to move its wrong. leobrighton
  • Score: 0

8:21pm Tue 5 Feb 13

miss eny says...

My self and my partner work full time, we have two bedrooms and two children, our rent is £800 per month, I have to budget every month.Why should these people be getting everything handed to them on a plate?
My self and my partner work full time, we have two bedrooms and two children, our rent is £800 per month, I have to budget every month.Why should these people be getting everything handed to them on a plate? miss eny
  • Score: 0

9:19pm Tue 5 Feb 13

nocando says...

I wonder how on earth the predictably hysterical and over dramatic socialist 'public service' usual suspects with their limitless plans for other peoples' money (which obviously includes their own administrative slice of the loot, payable until they die or else...) can actually make such absurd statements as 'people are contemplating suicide over the thought of having to contribute towards their own rent' or 'they face having to find more money or move'.
Not only are they cynically insulting the majority of the population who manage to pay for their own accommodation and live within their means but they'd also have us believe that everyone on benefits is utterly incapable of managing their lives and that its the duty of the taxpayer to shield them from ever having to do so.
I think its about time these lefties learnt to stand on their own feet without leeching and patronising, their tactics are dishonest and self serving.
I wonder how on earth the predictably hysterical and over dramatic socialist 'public service' usual suspects with their limitless plans for other peoples' money (which obviously includes their own administrative slice of the loot, payable until they die or else...) can actually make such absurd statements as 'people are contemplating suicide over the thought of having to contribute towards their own rent' or 'they face having to find more money or move'. Not only are they cynically insulting the majority of the population who manage to pay for their own accommodation and live within their means but they'd also have us believe that everyone on benefits is utterly incapable of managing their lives and that its the duty of the taxpayer to shield them from ever having to do so. I think its about time these lefties learnt to stand on their own feet without leeching and patronising, their tactics are dishonest and self serving. nocando
  • Score: 0

9:36pm Tue 5 Feb 13

allfairinloveandwar says...

There are so many familes waiting to be housed that i dont think its fair that people under occupy social housing, They didnt work and save for years to buy the property but were given it in a time of need so surely it only right that they should vacate when no longer needed so that other families should receive the same help ??
There are so many familes waiting to be housed that i dont think its fair that people under occupy social housing, They didnt work and save for years to buy the property but were given it in a time of need so surely it only right that they should vacate when no longer needed so that other families should receive the same help ?? allfairinloveandwar
  • Score: 0

9:51pm Tue 5 Feb 13

gingersandy38 says...

There has always been larger properties occupied by people on their own. Nothing was every done as there where not decent properties for them to move into. They where therefore lothe to move.Especially as they had looked after their properties for all those years.Sadly a lot of the smaller properties have not been well kept.
Some people try to do exchanges into smaller properties themselves, but a lot of the time they are thwarted. Even though a family would benefit from the move.
Can't help but feel that the people who are going to moved out will not be fully considered. Even though they have been tenants with which ever Association or Council for many years. Can't help but feel peoples needs will be neglected in this matter.
There has always been larger properties occupied by people on their own. Nothing was every done as there where not decent properties for them to move into. They where therefore lothe to move.Especially as they had looked after their properties for all those years.Sadly a lot of the smaller properties have not been well kept. Some people try to do exchanges into smaller properties themselves, but a lot of the time they are thwarted. Even though a family would benefit from the move. Can't help but feel that the people who are going to moved out will not be fully considered. Even though they have been tenants with which ever Association or Council for many years. Can't help but feel peoples needs will be neglected in this matter. gingersandy38
  • Score: 0

12:06pm Wed 6 Feb 13

wippasnapper says...

@Argus, as I understand it as it was explained to use on TDN (Tenant Disability Network) witch is part of the tenant groups movement around Brighton, Hove & Portslade… this bedroom tax will only affect those of use who live in rented accommodation secondly it dose not affect those in reseat of DLA as some need a live-in career or those to old to work… so why the hell are YOU the “Argus” scaremongering and misinforming DO YOU KNOW the stress your story will give to those who read it!
@Argus, as I understand it as it was explained to use on TDN (Tenant Disability Network) witch is part of the tenant groups movement around Brighton, Hove & Portslade… this bedroom tax will only affect those of use who live in rented accommodation secondly it dose not affect those in reseat of DLA as some need a live-in career or those to old to work… so why the hell are YOU the “Argus” scaremongering and misinforming DO YOU KNOW the stress your story will give to those who read it! wippasnapper
  • Score: 0

6:52pm Mon 11 Feb 13

Beachcomber56 says...

When I was younger the Tories used to accuse Labour of practising the "politics of envy". Now they're doing it themselves, except they're encouraging people of modest means to envy those even less well off than themselves. Rather than trying to stir up resentment against benefit recipients occupying more than the bare minimum of space needed for subsistence, Mike Weatherley needs to explain why hard-working families should be paying bonuses to executives of RBS, which is 80% publicly owned, or subsidising dividends to railway shareholders.
When I was younger the Tories used to accuse Labour of practising the "politics of envy". Now they're doing it themselves, except they're encouraging people of modest means to envy those even less well off than themselves. Rather than trying to stir up resentment against benefit recipients occupying more than the bare minimum of space needed for subsistence, Mike Weatherley needs to explain why hard-working families should be paying bonuses to executives of RBS, which is 80% publicly owned, or subsidising dividends to railway shareholders. Beachcomber56
  • Score: 0

6:37pm Tue 12 Feb 13

Jayne120 says...

To help solve the problem of empty bedrooms, why doesn't the council allow their tenants to have lodgers, this would help with homelessness, and make tenants able to afford the rent levy.
To help solve the problem of empty bedrooms, why doesn't the council allow their tenants to have lodgers, this would help with homelessness, and make tenants able to afford the rent levy. Jayne120
  • Score: 0

Comments are closed on this article.

click2find

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree