Patient sent home from Brighton hospital with tube in arm

The Argus: Richard Reeve complained of a sore arm after a cannula tube was not removed Richard Reeve complained of a sore arm after a cannula tube was not removed

An elderly patient was sent home from hospital with a cannula tube for a drip still stuck in his arm.

The mistake was only spotted two days later when 96-year-old Richard Reeve complained to his carer that his arm was sore.

Mr Reeve’s family are now demanding an explanation and apology from Royal Sussex County Hospital in Brighton.

Hospital bosses say an investigation will be launched into the incident.

Mr Reeve, who lives in Brighton, was taken to hospital in the early hours of February 2 after developing chest pains.

He underwent tests and was monitored by staff before a decision was taken later that day that he was well enough to be discharged.

Mr Reeve, who was only wearing pyjamas, had to wait for some time before an ambulance arrived to take him home.

When he was visited by his carer two days later, the cannula was discovered.

Upset and angry

The carer was not qualified to remove it and so arrangements had to be made for his GP to visit to take it out.

Mr Reeve’s daughter, Stella Mountney, said: “I am upset and very angry that my father has been on the receiving end of such an unacceptable incident.

“It is absolutely disgraceful.

“The nurses must be seen to take responsibility for their own practice and to be trusted totally in making all patients comfortable and safe.”

A hospital spokesman said: “We are sorry if Mr Reeve and his family are not happy with the care he received in our hospital.

“We have a formal complaints procedure where we will be investigating what happened in this case and will respond to Mr Reeve and his daughter as soon as this is completed.

“In the meantime, if Mr Reeve or his family have any further concerns we will be happy to discuss these with them.”

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Comments (14)

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1:14pm Tue 12 Feb 13

toldsloth says...

Message to the family - don't hold your breath on the outcome of the "inquiry". My Mum fell out of a bed at "large hospital in South London" at 4:00am and fractured her pelvis in four places. This was a bed which supposedly had the sides raised and according to the "Inquiry", she fell out of the bottom of the bed. Lets get something clear, my Mum was 85, had a CDIFF infection, was 5 stone and had been bed-bound for two month following bowel surgery. The fact she couldn't even sit up ctraight let along haul herself to the end of the bed and out of it seemed to escape the attention of the people carrying out the enquiry. Oh hang on, these were the SAME people tasked with caring for her in the first place. The NHS is rotton to the core; I watched nurses literally drawing lots to decide who's turn it was to deal with a bedpan. I witnessed her having to wait 35 minutes for a bedpan and the resulting distress it caused. I witnessed her severe dehydration because nobody had thought to help her drink. The list goes on. I hope the records I've requested show sufficient negligence to persue the hospital in question in the courts. That said, it won't help my Mum - she died two weeks ago.......
Message to the family - don't hold your breath on the outcome of the "inquiry". My Mum fell out of a bed at "large hospital in South London" at 4:00am and fractured her pelvis in four places. This was a bed which supposedly had the sides raised and according to the "Inquiry", she fell out of the bottom of the bed. Lets get something clear, my Mum was 85, had a CDIFF infection, was 5 stone and had been bed-bound for two month following bowel surgery. The fact she couldn't even sit up ctraight let along haul herself to the end of the bed and out of it seemed to escape the attention of the people carrying out the enquiry. Oh hang on, these were the SAME people tasked with caring for her in the first place. The NHS is rotton to the core; I watched nurses literally drawing lots to decide who's turn it was to deal with a bedpan. I witnessed her having to wait 35 minutes for a bedpan and the resulting distress it caused. I witnessed her severe dehydration because nobody had thought to help her drink. The list goes on. I hope the records I've requested show sufficient negligence to persue the hospital in question in the courts. That said, it won't help my Mum - she died two weeks ago....... toldsloth

2:19pm Tue 12 Feb 13

Crystal Ball says...

Very very sorry to hear this. So many people have had elderly relatives experience sub-standard care and/or neglect.

As mentioned, there needs to be a country-wide and rapid review of policy, procedure and action to improve standards of care, recovery speed and quality and eliminate distress for all concerned.
Very very sorry to hear this. So many people have had elderly relatives experience sub-standard care and/or neglect. As mentioned, there needs to be a country-wide and rapid review of policy, procedure and action to improve standards of care, recovery speed and quality and eliminate distress for all concerned. Crystal Ball

3:07pm Tue 12 Feb 13

straightasadye says...

toldsloth wrote:
Message to the family - don't hold your breath on the outcome of the "inquiry". My Mum fell out of a bed at "large hospital in South London" at 4:00am and fractured her pelvis in four places. This was a bed which supposedly had the sides raised and according to the "Inquiry", she fell out of the bottom of the bed. Lets get something clear, my Mum was 85, had a CDIFF infection, was 5 stone and had been bed-bound for two month following bowel surgery. The fact she couldn't even sit up ctraight let along haul herself to the end of the bed and out of it seemed to escape the attention of the people carrying out the enquiry. Oh hang on, these were the SAME people tasked with caring for her in the first place. The NHS is rotton to the core; I watched nurses literally drawing lots to decide who's turn it was to deal with a bedpan. I witnessed her having to wait 35 minutes for a bedpan and the resulting distress it caused. I witnessed her severe dehydration because nobody had thought to help her drink. The list goes on. I hope the records I've requested show sufficient negligence to persue the hospital in question in the courts. That said, it won't help my Mum - she died two weeks ago.......
It's accepted that hospitals nowadays are not all their cracked up to be but hang on a minute, something doesn't add up here? Witnessed mum waiting 35 minutes for a bedpan and witnessed amongst other things mum becoming severly dehydrated because nobody had thought to help her drink. Q. Why if 'toldsloth' witnessed the list of events detailed - and the list that wasn't - didn't he/she do something about it like for example fetching a bedpan for her? No shortage of disposable bedpans in hospitals and one doesn't need radar to locate one. And where were the family of 96 year old Richard, the chap who went home with a cannula still inserted in his arm ( I did once and slipped it out myself when I realised it was still in) when he had to wait 'some time' for an ambulance to take him home? Knowing the elderly gentleman was to be discharged (and if they didn't the family should have made it their business to know what was going on) why didn't they make arrangements for transporting him home? Any wonder the NHS nowadays is buckling at the knees?
[quote][p][bold]toldsloth[/bold] wrote: Message to the family - don't hold your breath on the outcome of the "inquiry". My Mum fell out of a bed at "large hospital in South London" at 4:00am and fractured her pelvis in four places. This was a bed which supposedly had the sides raised and according to the "Inquiry", she fell out of the bottom of the bed. Lets get something clear, my Mum was 85, had a CDIFF infection, was 5 stone and had been bed-bound for two month following bowel surgery. The fact she couldn't even sit up ctraight let along haul herself to the end of the bed and out of it seemed to escape the attention of the people carrying out the enquiry. Oh hang on, these were the SAME people tasked with caring for her in the first place. The NHS is rotton to the core; I watched nurses literally drawing lots to decide who's turn it was to deal with a bedpan. I witnessed her having to wait 35 minutes for a bedpan and the resulting distress it caused. I witnessed her severe dehydration because nobody had thought to help her drink. The list goes on. I hope the records I've requested show sufficient negligence to persue the hospital in question in the courts. That said, it won't help my Mum - she died two weeks ago.......[/p][/quote]It's accepted that hospitals nowadays are not all their cracked up to be but hang on a minute, something doesn't add up here? Witnessed mum waiting 35 minutes for a bedpan and witnessed amongst other things mum becoming severly dehydrated because nobody had thought to help her drink. Q. Why if 'toldsloth' witnessed the list of events detailed - and the list that wasn't - didn't he/she do something about it like for example fetching a bedpan for her? No shortage of disposable bedpans in hospitals and one doesn't need radar to locate one. And where were the family of 96 year old Richard, the chap who went home with a cannula still inserted in his arm ( I did once and slipped it out myself when I realised it was still in) when he had to wait 'some time' for an ambulance to take him home? Knowing the elderly gentleman was to be discharged (and if they didn't the family should have made it their business to know what was going on) why didn't they make arrangements for transporting him home? Any wonder the NHS nowadays is buckling at the knees? straightasadye

3:50pm Tue 12 Feb 13

gingersandy38 says...

hardly surprising this has happened. Many things happen and people are treated in such a fashion. But nothing is ever done about it. Even though people complain about it. This will definately be one of these cases. Sorry to hear this happened.
When vulnerable people are treated this way, cant help but wonder why nothing is done to make sure this never happens again, and again
hardly surprising this has happened. Many things happen and people are treated in such a fashion. But nothing is ever done about it. Even though people complain about it. This will definately be one of these cases. Sorry to hear this happened. When vulnerable people are treated this way, cant help but wonder why nothing is done to make sure this never happens again, and again gingersandy38

6:27pm Tue 12 Feb 13

006 and a third says...

straightasadye wrote:
toldsloth wrote:
Message to the family - don't hold your breath on the outcome of the "inquiry". My Mum fell out of a bed at "large hospital in South London" at 4:00am and fractured her pelvis in four places. This was a bed which supposedly had the sides raised and according to the "Inquiry", she fell out of the bottom of the bed. Lets get something clear, my Mum was 85, had a CDIFF infection, was 5 stone and had been bed-bound for two month following bowel surgery. The fact she couldn't even sit up ctraight let along haul herself to the end of the bed and out of it seemed to escape the attention of the people carrying out the enquiry. Oh hang on, these were the SAME people tasked with caring for her in the first place. The NHS is rotton to the core; I watched nurses literally drawing lots to decide who's turn it was to deal with a bedpan. I witnessed her having to wait 35 minutes for a bedpan and the resulting distress it caused. I witnessed her severe dehydration because nobody had thought to help her drink. The list goes on. I hope the records I've requested show sufficient negligence to persue the hospital in question in the courts. That said, it won't help my Mum - she died two weeks ago.......
It's accepted that hospitals nowadays are not all their cracked up to be but hang on a minute, something doesn't add up here? Witnessed mum waiting 35 minutes for a bedpan and witnessed amongst other things mum becoming severly dehydrated because nobody had thought to help her drink. Q. Why if 'toldsloth' witnessed the list of events detailed - and the list that wasn't - didn't he/she do something about it like for example fetching a bedpan for her? No shortage of disposable bedpans in hospitals and one doesn't need radar to locate one. And where were the family of 96 year old Richard, the chap who went home with a cannula still inserted in his arm ( I did once and slipped it out myself when I realised it was still in) when he had to wait 'some time' for an ambulance to take him home? Knowing the elderly gentleman was to be discharged (and if they didn't the family should have made it their business to know what was going on) why didn't they make arrangements for transporting him home? Any wonder the NHS nowadays is buckling at the knees?
Such a good point.
I've seen relatives screaming at nurses and HCAs about many things, e,g. "aren't ya gonna give my mum a f'in drink" when the relative is sitting by the mother's bed in front of a full water pitcher and glass. Maybe they didn't know how to do the slightest thing for anyone else but himself.

Also relatives who have been at the hospital at the time of discharge home but have declined to give their own mother a lift home because it wasn't convenient and the hospital transport was "free anyway".
[quote][p][bold]straightasadye[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]toldsloth[/bold] wrote: Message to the family - don't hold your breath on the outcome of the "inquiry". My Mum fell out of a bed at "large hospital in South London" at 4:00am and fractured her pelvis in four places. This was a bed which supposedly had the sides raised and according to the "Inquiry", she fell out of the bottom of the bed. Lets get something clear, my Mum was 85, had a CDIFF infection, was 5 stone and had been bed-bound for two month following bowel surgery. The fact she couldn't even sit up ctraight let along haul herself to the end of the bed and out of it seemed to escape the attention of the people carrying out the enquiry. Oh hang on, these were the SAME people tasked with caring for her in the first place. The NHS is rotton to the core; I watched nurses literally drawing lots to decide who's turn it was to deal with a bedpan. I witnessed her having to wait 35 minutes for a bedpan and the resulting distress it caused. I witnessed her severe dehydration because nobody had thought to help her drink. The list goes on. I hope the records I've requested show sufficient negligence to persue the hospital in question in the courts. That said, it won't help my Mum - she died two weeks ago.......[/p][/quote]It's accepted that hospitals nowadays are not all their cracked up to be but hang on a minute, something doesn't add up here? Witnessed mum waiting 35 minutes for a bedpan and witnessed amongst other things mum becoming severly dehydrated because nobody had thought to help her drink. Q. Why if 'toldsloth' witnessed the list of events detailed - and the list that wasn't - didn't he/she do something about it like for example fetching a bedpan for her? No shortage of disposable bedpans in hospitals and one doesn't need radar to locate one. And where were the family of 96 year old Richard, the chap who went home with a cannula still inserted in his arm ( I did once and slipped it out myself when I realised it was still in) when he had to wait 'some time' for an ambulance to take him home? Knowing the elderly gentleman was to be discharged (and if they didn't the family should have made it their business to know what was going on) why didn't they make arrangements for transporting him home? Any wonder the NHS nowadays is buckling at the knees?[/p][/quote]Such a good point. I've seen relatives screaming at nurses and HCAs about many things, e,g. "aren't ya gonna give my mum a f'in drink" when the relative is sitting by the mother's bed in front of a full water pitcher and glass. Maybe they didn't know how to do the slightest thing for anyone else but himself. Also relatives who have been at the hospital at the time of discharge home but have declined to give their own mother a lift home because it wasn't convenient and the hospital transport was "free anyway". 006 and a third

7:16pm Tue 12 Feb 13

toldsloth says...

006 and a third wrote:
straightasadye wrote:
toldsloth wrote:
Message to the family - don't hold your breath on the outcome of the "inquiry". My Mum fell out of a bed at "large hospital in South London" at 4:00am and fractured her pelvis in four places. This was a bed which supposedly had the sides raised and according to the "Inquiry", she fell out of the bottom of the bed. Lets get something clear, my Mum was 85, had a CDIFF infection, was 5 stone and had been bed-bound for two month following bowel surgery. The fact she couldn't even sit up ctraight let along haul herself to the end of the bed and out of it seemed to escape the attention of the people carrying out the enquiry. Oh hang on, these were the SAME people tasked with caring for her in the first place. The NHS is rotton to the core; I watched nurses literally drawing lots to decide who's turn it was to deal with a bedpan. I witnessed her having to wait 35 minutes for a bedpan and the resulting distress it caused. I witnessed her severe dehydration because nobody had thought to help her drink. The list goes on. I hope the records I've requested show sufficient negligence to persue the hospital in question in the courts. That said, it won't help my Mum - she died two weeks ago.......
It's accepted that hospitals nowadays are not all their cracked up to be but hang on a minute, something doesn't add up here? Witnessed mum waiting 35 minutes for a bedpan and witnessed amongst other things mum becoming severly dehydrated because nobody had thought to help her drink. Q. Why if 'toldsloth' witnessed the list of events detailed - and the list that wasn't - didn't he/she do something about it like for example fetching a bedpan for her? No shortage of disposable bedpans in hospitals and one doesn't need radar to locate one. And where were the family of 96 year old Richard, the chap who went home with a cannula still inserted in his arm ( I did once and slipped it out myself when I realised it was still in) when he had to wait 'some time' for an ambulance to take him home? Knowing the elderly gentleman was to be discharged (and if they didn't the family should have made it their business to know what was going on) why didn't they make arrangements for transporting him home? Any wonder the NHS nowadays is buckling at the knees?
Such a good point.
I've seen relatives screaming at nurses and HCAs about many things, e,g. "aren't ya gonna give my mum a f'in drink" when the relative is sitting by the mother's bed in front of a full water pitcher and glass. Maybe they didn't know how to do the slightest thing for anyone else but himself.

Also relatives who have been at the hospital at the time of discharge home but have declined to give their own mother a lift home because it wasn't convenient and the hospital transport was "free anyway".
What a pair of inconsiderate people you are. My mother had a broken pelvis and a CDIFF infection which resulted in severe diarrhoea. Barrier nursing was in place and moving Mum resulted in severe pain. I am not a health professioal and I was unable to safely move my Mum onto a bedpan. The dehydration was witnessed when I arrived at visiting time to find Mum unable to speak because she was so dry. Despite attempts to hydrate her it required the nursing staff to hang fluids to bring her levels back up. It took almost an hour for staff to hang the fluids. Does this answer your ill informed and poorly directed comments? Unfortunately I am burying my Mum this week.
[quote][p][bold]006 and a third[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]straightasadye[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]toldsloth[/bold] wrote: Message to the family - don't hold your breath on the outcome of the "inquiry". My Mum fell out of a bed at "large hospital in South London" at 4:00am and fractured her pelvis in four places. This was a bed which supposedly had the sides raised and according to the "Inquiry", she fell out of the bottom of the bed. Lets get something clear, my Mum was 85, had a CDIFF infection, was 5 stone and had been bed-bound for two month following bowel surgery. The fact she couldn't even sit up ctraight let along haul herself to the end of the bed and out of it seemed to escape the attention of the people carrying out the enquiry. Oh hang on, these were the SAME people tasked with caring for her in the first place. The NHS is rotton to the core; I watched nurses literally drawing lots to decide who's turn it was to deal with a bedpan. I witnessed her having to wait 35 minutes for a bedpan and the resulting distress it caused. I witnessed her severe dehydration because nobody had thought to help her drink. The list goes on. I hope the records I've requested show sufficient negligence to persue the hospital in question in the courts. That said, it won't help my Mum - she died two weeks ago.......[/p][/quote]It's accepted that hospitals nowadays are not all their cracked up to be but hang on a minute, something doesn't add up here? Witnessed mum waiting 35 minutes for a bedpan and witnessed amongst other things mum becoming severly dehydrated because nobody had thought to help her drink. Q. Why if 'toldsloth' witnessed the list of events detailed - and the list that wasn't - didn't he/she do something about it like for example fetching a bedpan for her? No shortage of disposable bedpans in hospitals and one doesn't need radar to locate one. And where were the family of 96 year old Richard, the chap who went home with a cannula still inserted in his arm ( I did once and slipped it out myself when I realised it was still in) when he had to wait 'some time' for an ambulance to take him home? Knowing the elderly gentleman was to be discharged (and if they didn't the family should have made it their business to know what was going on) why didn't they make arrangements for transporting him home? Any wonder the NHS nowadays is buckling at the knees?[/p][/quote]Such a good point. I've seen relatives screaming at nurses and HCAs about many things, e,g. "aren't ya gonna give my mum a f'in drink" when the relative is sitting by the mother's bed in front of a full water pitcher and glass. Maybe they didn't know how to do the slightest thing for anyone else but himself. Also relatives who have been at the hospital at the time of discharge home but have declined to give their own mother a lift home because it wasn't convenient and the hospital transport was "free anyway".[/p][/quote]What a pair of inconsiderate people you are. My mother had a broken pelvis and a CDIFF infection which resulted in severe diarrhoea. Barrier nursing was in place and moving Mum resulted in severe pain. I am not a health professioal and I was unable to safely move my Mum onto a bedpan. The dehydration was witnessed when I arrived at visiting time to find Mum unable to speak because she was so dry. Despite attempts to hydrate her it required the nursing staff to hang fluids to bring her levels back up. It took almost an hour for staff to hang the fluids. Does this answer your ill informed and poorly directed comments? Unfortunately I am burying my Mum this week. toldsloth

8:09pm Tue 12 Feb 13

lorrie1 says...

This exact thing happened to me when i was released from the r.s.c.h, Got home and removed it myself, it bled (HEAVILY) for about three hours it was squirting out of my arm!
This exact thing happened to me when i was released from the r.s.c.h, Got home and removed it myself, it bled (HEAVILY) for about three hours it was squirting out of my arm! lorrie1

9:22pm Tue 12 Feb 13

Valerie Paynter says...

That cut and paste robot-speak hospital spokeman statement is a sacking offence in my view. Totally insulting.

And someone on the ward will be getting a serious rocket for failing to ensure that canula was not removed but nobody out here will ever hear a word about it.
That cut and paste robot-speak hospital spokeman statement is a sacking offence in my view. Totally insulting. And someone on the ward will be getting a serious rocket for failing to ensure that canula was not removed but nobody out here will ever hear a word about it. Valerie Paynter

10:05pm Tue 12 Feb 13

oldbonnet says...

toldsloth wrote:
006 and a third wrote:
straightasadye wrote:
toldsloth wrote:
Message to the family - don't hold your breath on the outcome of the "inquiry". My Mum fell out of a bed at "large hospital in South London" at 4:00am and fractured her pelvis in four places. This was a bed which supposedly had the sides raised and according to the "Inquiry", she fell out of the bottom of the bed. Lets get something clear, my Mum was 85, had a CDIFF infection, was 5 stone and had been bed-bound for two month following bowel surgery. The fact she couldn't even sit up ctraight let along haul herself to the end of the bed and out of it seemed to escape the attention of the people carrying out the enquiry. Oh hang on, these were the SAME people tasked with caring for her in the first place. The NHS is rotton to the core; I watched nurses literally drawing lots to decide who's turn it was to deal with a bedpan. I witnessed her having to wait 35 minutes for a bedpan and the resulting distress it caused. I witnessed her severe dehydration because nobody had thought to help her drink. The list goes on. I hope the records I've requested show sufficient negligence to persue the hospital in question in the courts. That said, it won't help my Mum - she died two weeks ago.......
It's accepted that hospitals nowadays are not all their cracked up to be but hang on a minute, something doesn't add up here? Witnessed mum waiting 35 minutes for a bedpan and witnessed amongst other things mum becoming severly dehydrated because nobody had thought to help her drink. Q. Why if 'toldsloth' witnessed the list of events detailed - and the list that wasn't - didn't he/she do something about it like for example fetching a bedpan for her? No shortage of disposable bedpans in hospitals and one doesn't need radar to locate one. And where were the family of 96 year old Richard, the chap who went home with a cannula still inserted in his arm ( I did once and slipped it out myself when I realised it was still in) when he had to wait 'some time' for an ambulance to take him home? Knowing the elderly gentleman was to be discharged (and if they didn't the family should have made it their business to know what was going on) why didn't they make arrangements for transporting him home? Any wonder the NHS nowadays is buckling at the knees?
Such a good point.
I've seen relatives screaming at nurses and HCAs about many things, e,g. "aren't ya gonna give my mum a f'in drink" when the relative is sitting by the mother's bed in front of a full water pitcher and glass. Maybe they didn't know how to do the slightest thing for anyone else but himself.

Also relatives who have been at the hospital at the time of discharge home but have declined to give their own mother a lift home because it wasn't convenient and the hospital transport was "free anyway".
What a pair of inconsiderate people you are. My mother had a broken pelvis and a CDIFF infection which resulted in severe diarrhoea. Barrier nursing was in place and moving Mum resulted in severe pain. I am not a health professioal and I was unable to safely move my Mum onto a bedpan. The dehydration was witnessed when I arrived at visiting time to find Mum unable to speak because she was so dry. Despite attempts to hydrate her it required the nursing staff to hang fluids to bring her levels back up. It took almost an hour for staff to hang the fluids. Does this answer your ill informed and poorly directed comments? Unfortunately I am burying my Mum this week.
It seems to me toldsloth, that in the face of just criticism, you changed tack.
In your original post you clearly stated that you witnessed your 85 year old Mum having to wait 35 minutes for a bedpan. Now in the face of criticism you say it was not a bedpan she waited 35 minutes for but 35 minutes for somebody to put her on one. Well, if the latter was the case then, with your Mum weighing only 5 stones and in "desperate" need of being put on the bedpan, to slip one under her without causing her undue pain was surely not beyond the might of a male or female, and in the particular circumstances was the sensible thing to do?
[quote][p][bold]toldsloth[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]006 and a third[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]straightasadye[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]toldsloth[/bold] wrote: Message to the family - don't hold your breath on the outcome of the "inquiry". My Mum fell out of a bed at "large hospital in South London" at 4:00am and fractured her pelvis in four places. This was a bed which supposedly had the sides raised and according to the "Inquiry", she fell out of the bottom of the bed. Lets get something clear, my Mum was 85, had a CDIFF infection, was 5 stone and had been bed-bound for two month following bowel surgery. The fact she couldn't even sit up ctraight let along haul herself to the end of the bed and out of it seemed to escape the attention of the people carrying out the enquiry. Oh hang on, these were the SAME people tasked with caring for her in the first place. The NHS is rotton to the core; I watched nurses literally drawing lots to decide who's turn it was to deal with a bedpan. I witnessed her having to wait 35 minutes for a bedpan and the resulting distress it caused. I witnessed her severe dehydration because nobody had thought to help her drink. The list goes on. I hope the records I've requested show sufficient negligence to persue the hospital in question in the courts. That said, it won't help my Mum - she died two weeks ago.......[/p][/quote]It's accepted that hospitals nowadays are not all their cracked up to be but hang on a minute, something doesn't add up here? Witnessed mum waiting 35 minutes for a bedpan and witnessed amongst other things mum becoming severly dehydrated because nobody had thought to help her drink. Q. Why if 'toldsloth' witnessed the list of events detailed - and the list that wasn't - didn't he/she do something about it like for example fetching a bedpan for her? No shortage of disposable bedpans in hospitals and one doesn't need radar to locate one. And where were the family of 96 year old Richard, the chap who went home with a cannula still inserted in his arm ( I did once and slipped it out myself when I realised it was still in) when he had to wait 'some time' for an ambulance to take him home? Knowing the elderly gentleman was to be discharged (and if they didn't the family should have made it their business to know what was going on) why didn't they make arrangements for transporting him home? Any wonder the NHS nowadays is buckling at the knees?[/p][/quote]Such a good point. I've seen relatives screaming at nurses and HCAs about many things, e,g. "aren't ya gonna give my mum a f'in drink" when the relative is sitting by the mother's bed in front of a full water pitcher and glass. Maybe they didn't know how to do the slightest thing for anyone else but himself. Also relatives who have been at the hospital at the time of discharge home but have declined to give their own mother a lift home because it wasn't convenient and the hospital transport was "free anyway".[/p][/quote]What a pair of inconsiderate people you are. My mother had a broken pelvis and a CDIFF infection which resulted in severe diarrhoea. Barrier nursing was in place and moving Mum resulted in severe pain. I am not a health professioal and I was unable to safely move my Mum onto a bedpan. The dehydration was witnessed when I arrived at visiting time to find Mum unable to speak because she was so dry. Despite attempts to hydrate her it required the nursing staff to hang fluids to bring her levels back up. It took almost an hour for staff to hang the fluids. Does this answer your ill informed and poorly directed comments? Unfortunately I am burying my Mum this week.[/p][/quote]It seems to me toldsloth, that in the face of just criticism, you changed tack. In your original post you clearly stated that you witnessed your 85 year old Mum having to wait 35 minutes for a bedpan. Now in the face of criticism you say it was not a bedpan she waited 35 minutes for but 35 minutes for somebody to put her on one. Well, if the latter was the case then, with your Mum weighing only 5 stones and in "desperate" need of being put on the bedpan, to slip one under her without causing her undue pain was surely not beyond the might of a male or female, and in the particular circumstances was the sensible thing to do? oldbonnet

6:08am Wed 13 Feb 13

Anna Phylactic says...

This sort of thing happens when staff are rushed and stressed. Luckily going home with a cannula in your arm isn't dangerous and is easily rectified. Shouldn't happen though and easily preventable.
This sort of thing happens when staff are rushed and stressed. Luckily going home with a cannula in your arm isn't dangerous and is easily rectified. Shouldn't happen though and easily preventable. Anna Phylactic

7:55am Wed 13 Feb 13

qm says...

Anna Phylactic wrote:
This sort of thing happens when staff are rushed and stressed. Luckily going home with a cannula in your arm isn't dangerous and is easily rectified. Shouldn't happen though and easily preventable.
A voice of reason at last although an addendum to your first line could include "while managers sit in their offices playing with spreadsheets and tweaking kpi's to engineer self-promotion".
Cynical? Just a wee tad!
[quote][p][bold]Anna Phylactic[/bold] wrote: This sort of thing happens when staff are rushed and stressed. Luckily going home with a cannula in your arm isn't dangerous and is easily rectified. Shouldn't happen though and easily preventable.[/p][/quote]A voice of reason at last although an addendum to your first line could include "while managers sit in their offices playing with spreadsheets and tweaking kpi's to engineer self-promotion". Cynical? Just a wee tad! qm

7:58am Wed 13 Feb 13

mimseycal says...

qm wrote:
Anna Phylactic wrote:
This sort of thing happens when staff are rushed and stressed. Luckily going home with a cannula in your arm isn't dangerous and is easily rectified. Shouldn't happen though and easily preventable.
A voice of reason at last although an addendum to your first line could include "while managers sit in their offices playing with spreadsheets and tweaking kpi's to engineer self-promotion".
Cynical? Just a wee tad!
I must agree ... there are far worse things to worry about with regards to the NHS in general and The Sussex County in specific.
[quote][p][bold]qm[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Anna Phylactic[/bold] wrote: This sort of thing happens when staff are rushed and stressed. Luckily going home with a cannula in your arm isn't dangerous and is easily rectified. Shouldn't happen though and easily preventable.[/p][/quote]A voice of reason at last although an addendum to your first line could include "while managers sit in their offices playing with spreadsheets and tweaking kpi's to engineer self-promotion". Cynical? Just a wee tad![/p][/quote]I must agree ... there are far worse things to worry about with regards to the NHS in general and The Sussex County in specific. mimseycal

2:09pm Wed 13 Feb 13

toldsloth says...

oldbonnet wrote:
toldsloth wrote:
006 and a third wrote:
straightasadye wrote:
toldsloth wrote:
Message to the family - don't hold your breath on the outcome of the "inquiry". My Mum fell out of a bed at "large hospital in South London" at 4:00am and fractured her pelvis in four places. This was a bed which supposedly had the sides raised and according to the "Inquiry", she fell out of the bottom of the bed. Lets get something clear, my Mum was 85, had a CDIFF infection, was 5 stone and had been bed-bound for two month following bowel surgery. The fact she couldn't even sit up ctraight let along haul herself to the end of the bed and out of it seemed to escape the attention of the people carrying out the enquiry. Oh hang on, these were the SAME people tasked with caring for her in the first place. The NHS is rotton to the core; I watched nurses literally drawing lots to decide who's turn it was to deal with a bedpan. I witnessed her having to wait 35 minutes for a bedpan and the resulting distress it caused. I witnessed her severe dehydration because nobody had thought to help her drink. The list goes on. I hope the records I've requested show sufficient negligence to persue the hospital in question in the courts. That said, it won't help my Mum - she died two weeks ago.......
It's accepted that hospitals nowadays are not all their cracked up to be but hang on a minute, something doesn't add up here? Witnessed mum waiting 35 minutes for a bedpan and witnessed amongst other things mum becoming severly dehydrated because nobody had thought to help her drink. Q. Why if 'toldsloth' witnessed the list of events detailed - and the list that wasn't - didn't he/she do something about it like for example fetching a bedpan for her? No shortage of disposable bedpans in hospitals and one doesn't need radar to locate one. And where were the family of 96 year old Richard, the chap who went home with a cannula still inserted in his arm ( I did once and slipped it out myself when I realised it was still in) when he had to wait 'some time' for an ambulance to take him home? Knowing the elderly gentleman was to be discharged (and if they didn't the family should have made it their business to know what was going on) why didn't they make arrangements for transporting him home? Any wonder the NHS nowadays is buckling at the knees?
Such a good point.
I've seen relatives screaming at nurses and HCAs about many things, e,g. "aren't ya gonna give my mum a f'in drink" when the relative is sitting by the mother's bed in front of a full water pitcher and glass. Maybe they didn't know how to do the slightest thing for anyone else but himself.

Also relatives who have been at the hospital at the time of discharge home but have declined to give their own mother a lift home because it wasn't convenient and the hospital transport was "free anyway".
What a pair of inconsiderate people you are. My mother had a broken pelvis and a CDIFF infection which resulted in severe diarrhoea. Barrier nursing was in place and moving Mum resulted in severe pain. I am not a health professioal and I was unable to safely move my Mum onto a bedpan. The dehydration was witnessed when I arrived at visiting time to find Mum unable to speak because she was so dry. Despite attempts to hydrate her it required the nursing staff to hang fluids to bring her levels back up. It took almost an hour for staff to hang the fluids. Does this answer your ill informed and poorly directed comments? Unfortunately I am burying my Mum this week.
It seems to me toldsloth, that in the face of just criticism, you changed tack.
In your original post you clearly stated that you witnessed your 85 year old Mum having to wait 35 minutes for a bedpan. Now in the face of criticism you say it was not a bedpan she waited 35 minutes for but 35 minutes for somebody to put her on one. Well, if the latter was the case then, with your Mum weighing only 5 stones and in "desperate" need of being put on the bedpan, to slip one under her without causing her undue pain was surely not beyond the might of a male or female, and in the particular circumstances was the sensible thing to do?
I didn't change tack in the slightest - my original comments were written during my lunchhour so I apologise if there are symantecs at play here or I wasn't completely accurate in my wording. As for slipping a bedpan under my mother - you have no idea how much pain she was in and its easy from the comfort of your chair to simply suggest something that at the time, was impossible. She had four fractures of her pelvis therefore I could have caused serious harm by doing as you suggest. Fortunately unlike you I am intelligent enough to realise the fact. As you are obviously a sad little troll who has nothing better to do than wind others up from behind your screen, I'll just ignore your irellevant mublings from now on. Here's hoping you get all the benefits of the current excellent levels of service next time you're in hospital.
[quote][p][bold]oldbonnet[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]toldsloth[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]006 and a third[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]straightasadye[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]toldsloth[/bold] wrote: Message to the family - don't hold your breath on the outcome of the "inquiry". My Mum fell out of a bed at "large hospital in South London" at 4:00am and fractured her pelvis in four places. This was a bed which supposedly had the sides raised and according to the "Inquiry", she fell out of the bottom of the bed. Lets get something clear, my Mum was 85, had a CDIFF infection, was 5 stone and had been bed-bound for two month following bowel surgery. The fact she couldn't even sit up ctraight let along haul herself to the end of the bed and out of it seemed to escape the attention of the people carrying out the enquiry. Oh hang on, these were the SAME people tasked with caring for her in the first place. The NHS is rotton to the core; I watched nurses literally drawing lots to decide who's turn it was to deal with a bedpan. I witnessed her having to wait 35 minutes for a bedpan and the resulting distress it caused. I witnessed her severe dehydration because nobody had thought to help her drink. The list goes on. I hope the records I've requested show sufficient negligence to persue the hospital in question in the courts. That said, it won't help my Mum - she died two weeks ago.......[/p][/quote]It's accepted that hospitals nowadays are not all their cracked up to be but hang on a minute, something doesn't add up here? Witnessed mum waiting 35 minutes for a bedpan and witnessed amongst other things mum becoming severly dehydrated because nobody had thought to help her drink. Q. Why if 'toldsloth' witnessed the list of events detailed - and the list that wasn't - didn't he/she do something about it like for example fetching a bedpan for her? No shortage of disposable bedpans in hospitals and one doesn't need radar to locate one. And where were the family of 96 year old Richard, the chap who went home with a cannula still inserted in his arm ( I did once and slipped it out myself when I realised it was still in) when he had to wait 'some time' for an ambulance to take him home? Knowing the elderly gentleman was to be discharged (and if they didn't the family should have made it their business to know what was going on) why didn't they make arrangements for transporting him home? Any wonder the NHS nowadays is buckling at the knees?[/p][/quote]Such a good point. I've seen relatives screaming at nurses and HCAs about many things, e,g. "aren't ya gonna give my mum a f'in drink" when the relative is sitting by the mother's bed in front of a full water pitcher and glass. Maybe they didn't know how to do the slightest thing for anyone else but himself. Also relatives who have been at the hospital at the time of discharge home but have declined to give their own mother a lift home because it wasn't convenient and the hospital transport was "free anyway".[/p][/quote]What a pair of inconsiderate people you are. My mother had a broken pelvis and a CDIFF infection which resulted in severe diarrhoea. Barrier nursing was in place and moving Mum resulted in severe pain. I am not a health professioal and I was unable to safely move my Mum onto a bedpan. The dehydration was witnessed when I arrived at visiting time to find Mum unable to speak because she was so dry. Despite attempts to hydrate her it required the nursing staff to hang fluids to bring her levels back up. It took almost an hour for staff to hang the fluids. Does this answer your ill informed and poorly directed comments? Unfortunately I am burying my Mum this week.[/p][/quote]It seems to me toldsloth, that in the face of just criticism, you changed tack. In your original post you clearly stated that you witnessed your 85 year old Mum having to wait 35 minutes for a bedpan. Now in the face of criticism you say it was not a bedpan she waited 35 minutes for but 35 minutes for somebody to put her on one. Well, if the latter was the case then, with your Mum weighing only 5 stones and in "desperate" need of being put on the bedpan, to slip one under her without causing her undue pain was surely not beyond the might of a male or female, and in the particular circumstances was the sensible thing to do?[/p][/quote]I didn't change tack in the slightest - my original comments were written during my lunchhour so I apologise if there are symantecs at play here or I wasn't completely accurate in my wording. As for slipping a bedpan under my mother - you have no idea how much pain she was in and its easy from the comfort of your chair to simply suggest something that at the time, was impossible. She had four fractures of her pelvis therefore I could have caused serious harm by doing as you suggest. Fortunately unlike you I am intelligent enough to realise the fact. As you are obviously a sad little troll who has nothing better to do than wind others up from behind your screen, I'll just ignore your irellevant mublings from now on. Here's hoping you get all the benefits of the current excellent levels of service next time you're in hospital. toldsloth

12:42am Fri 15 Feb 13

Dudleyr says...

It is indeed a pity that such an inexcusable incident happened to such an exceptional man who now finds himself dealing with the frustrations and frailty of old age, the loss of a wonderful wife a few years ago and now an unfortunate lapse of medical standards. Most of us that the Royal Sussex County Hospital has provided excellent treatment for decades and there are thousands of grateful citizens who have had favorable experiences but now find themselves puzzled by a casual attitude more typical of certain Staffordshire institutions and medical services seemingly controlled by accountants and business managers.
I would like to point out that Mr. Reeve was respected by thousands of boys who passed through the Brighton, Hove & Sussex Grammar School during the 30 years he was Senior Art Master after the Second World War during which time he served his country with distinction even spending time as a mountain warfare instructor. He encouraged many boys to swim competitively, play Water Polo and to enjoy sailing in the sea. He also won the 1937 Pier to Pier race. His sound common sense, advice and insistence on healthy habits were well heeded and now .......... ? I wish his former self could rise from the ashes like the Phoenix and wring a few necks, just figuratively of course.
It is indeed a pity that such an inexcusable incident happened to such an exceptional man who now finds himself dealing with the frustrations and frailty of old age, the loss of a wonderful wife a few years ago and now an unfortunate lapse of medical standards. Most of us that the Royal Sussex County Hospital has provided excellent treatment for decades and there are thousands of grateful citizens who have had favorable experiences but now find themselves puzzled by a casual attitude more typical of certain Staffordshire institutions and medical services seemingly controlled by accountants and business managers. I would like to point out that Mr. Reeve was respected by thousands of boys who passed through the Brighton, Hove & Sussex Grammar School during the 30 years he was Senior Art Master after the Second World War during which time he served his country with distinction even spending time as a mountain warfare instructor. He encouraged many boys to swim competitively, play Water Polo and to enjoy sailing in the sea. He also won the 1937 Pier to Pier race. His sound common sense, advice and insistence on healthy habits were well heeded and now .......... ? I wish his former self could rise from the ashes like the Phoenix and wring a few necks, just figuratively of course. Dudleyr

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