Falcon wins fight to the death with seagull

The Argus: Falcon wins fight to the death with seagull Falcon wins fight to the death with seagull

A musician was walking down his road when a falcon and a seagull fell out the sky just metres away from him.

Chris Jones, 47, was strolling along Upper Bevendean Avenue in Brighton with his friend Ray Gannon when the juvenile peregrine falcon and its prey landed on the pavement.

The Argus:

After a minute of fighting, the hunter had secured its dinner and started tucking into it in the residential road.

Mr Jones said: “They just landed in front of me on the pavement and fought to the death – the seagull lost the battle.

“I tried initially to separate them as I thought the seagull was fighting its young, but then I saw it was a bird of prey and thought I’d better leave them to it because they can snap at you.

“We just had to let nature take its course.

“It took me by surprise. You might expect to see a dog fight, but not this.

“It was a weird sensation – it was a very sinister occurrence in a suburb street and reminded me of a Hitchcock moment.

“There was a flock of 50 to 100 birds above all squawking and making a real noise.

“It makes me wonder if a domestic cat would be safe. I guess seagulls are plentiful for avian predators, but it might have forgotten whose neighbourhood it was hunting in.”

Pulborough Brooks RSPB centre manager Sue Pagett said: “It is an unusual choice of prey as gulls are very good fliers and can normally escape capture.

“The peregrines’ usual method of taking prey is a fantastic high speed swoop where they can reach up to 180kph.

“The high-speed swoop means that the peregrine must catch its prey on the wing to avoid injuring itself on impact and gives them the reputation of being the fastest species around.

“Sometimes, if a surprise attack is possible at lower speeds, it snatches prey from a perch or the ground.

“Little of the kill is wasted – usually all that is left are the intestines and the breastbone with the feathered wings.

“The peregrines’ adaptability has allowed them to move into high-rise inner city buildings where their normal diet is feral pigeons.

“This incredible bird has survived persecution in the 50s and 60s and has recovered thanks to being afforded the highest degree of legal protection under Schedule 1 of the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981.

“In the breeding season, you can see them at Chichester Cathedral, where the RSPB provides a close-up view of these amazing birds from egg- laying to fledging.”

Comments (10)

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7:59am Mon 9 Dec 13

LeonBIank666 says...

This is very odd.

So you would separate them if a seagull was fighting its young, but not when you realized it was a bird of prey as one must let "nature take its course"?

Well I doubt the seagull world have kiddy fiddlers amongst their midst nor have the psychological concept of juvenile chastisement.

Ergo, stop playing God.
This is very odd. So you would separate them if a seagull was fighting its young, but not when you realized it was a bird of prey as one must let "nature take its course"? Well I doubt the seagull world have kiddy fiddlers amongst their midst nor have the psychological concept of juvenile chastisement. Ergo, stop playing God. LeonBIank666

9:46am Mon 9 Dec 13

The Prophet of Doom says...

So Mother Nature is now "sinister"? You need to get out more and leave nature alone at the same time.

What next, articles about leaves falling from the trees?
So Mother Nature is now "sinister"? You need to get out more and leave nature alone at the same time. What next, articles about leaves falling from the trees? The Prophet of Doom

10:34am Mon 9 Dec 13

PorkBoat says...

I don't think cats are at risk from Peregrines.
I don't think cats are at risk from Peregrines. PorkBoat

10:36am Mon 9 Dec 13

Anna Phylactic says...

Bravo Peregrine!

I bet you wouldn't wake me up at 4am by screeching to tell me you've dissolved the paint on my car with acidic jets of liquid poo.

More of this sort of thing please.
Bravo Peregrine! I bet you wouldn't wake me up at 4am by screeching to tell me you've dissolved the paint on my car with acidic jets of liquid poo. More of this sort of thing please. Anna Phylactic

3:23pm Mon 9 Dec 13

Saker-Clive says...

Was this definitelty a wild bird and not a falconers bird that had taken the gull after a long chase? Were there aylmeri (anklets) attached to the falcons leg........the picture doesn't show. Generally Peregrines don't take gulls unless trained for clearance work but the odd one does naturally get taken. I remember seeing the Peregrines on Sussex Heights bring back what looked like a black Headed Gull last year.
Was this definitelty a wild bird and not a falconers bird that had taken the gull after a long chase? Were there aylmeri (anklets) attached to the falcons leg........the picture doesn't show. Generally Peregrines don't take gulls unless trained for clearance work but the odd one does naturally get taken. I remember seeing the Peregrines on Sussex Heights bring back what looked like a black Headed Gull last year. Saker-Clive

5:34pm Mon 9 Dec 13

tonypulis says...

Crystal Palace fans will be delighted with that photo.
Crystal Palace fans will be delighted with that photo. tonypulis

1:33am Tue 10 Dec 13

boo2005 says...

LeonBIank666 wrote:
This is very odd.

So you would separate them if a seagull was fighting its young, but not when you realized it was a bird of prey as one must let "nature take its course"?

Well I doubt the seagull world have kiddy fiddlers amongst their midst nor have the psychological concept of juvenile chastisement.

Ergo, stop playing God.
what a pathetic statement to make!
[quote][p][bold]LeonBIank666[/bold] wrote: This is very odd. So you would separate them if a seagull was fighting its young, but not when you realized it was a bird of prey as one must let "nature take its course"? Well I doubt the seagull world have kiddy fiddlers amongst their midst nor have the psychological concept of juvenile chastisement. Ergo, stop playing God.[/p][/quote]what a pathetic statement to make! boo2005

3:26pm Tue 10 Dec 13

Dingbat99 says...

tonypulis wrote:
Crystal Palace fans will be delighted with that photo.
What has a falcon got to do with an eagle?
[quote][p][bold]tonypulis[/bold] wrote: Crystal Palace fans will be delighted with that photo.[/p][/quote]What has a falcon got to do with an eagle? Dingbat99

9:43pm Tue 10 Dec 13

tonypulis says...

Dingbat99 wrote:
tonypulis wrote:
Crystal Palace fans will be delighted with that photo.
What has a falcon got to do with an eagle?
Nothing. Crystal Palace Fans will still be delighted with that photo.
[quote][p][bold]Dingbat99[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]tonypulis[/bold] wrote: Crystal Palace fans will be delighted with that photo.[/p][/quote]What has a falcon got to do with an eagle?[/p][/quote]Nothing. Crystal Palace Fans will still be delighted with that photo. tonypulis

10:16pm Wed 11 Dec 13

FatherTed11 says...

More falcons please.
More falcons please. FatherTed11

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