Police in new drive top recruit new PCSOs

Sussex Police has launched a major recruitment drive which will put scores more frontline officers on the street.

From today the force will accept applications for 60 new police community support officers (PCSOs).

Patrolling on foot or by bicycle, the PCSOs will deal with low-level nuisance and anti-social behaviour as well as forging links with the public and businesses.

They will have the authority to remove vehicles and issue fixed penalty tickets as well as other duties that do not require the powers of a police officer, such as directing traffic and guarding crime scenes.

Police bosses hope the new recruits will be in place in time for next sum- mer.

Competition for places is expected to be high after more than 650 people put themselves forward for just 30 PCSO jobs with Sussex Police earlier this year.

The new recruitment drive comes after Sussex Police announced in August it was looking for 120 new special constables before the end of next year.

Katy Bourne, Sussex Police and Crime Commissioner, said: "I am very pleased to see recruitment open for 60 PCSOs, which will maintain the number of visible frontline officers in Sussex.

"PCSOs are the heart of neighbourhood policing teams and residents con- stantly tell me they value these officers in their communities.

"I hope this opportunity attracts applicants from a wide range of backgrounds who want to make a difference in the communities they serve.

“It is important that PCSOs reflect the diversity of our local communities so that Sussex Police can continue to improve its policing response."

Mark White, secretary of the Sussex Police Federation, said: “We have always welcomed the concept of PCSO's provided that they supported police officers and did not replace them.

“Our members believe that PSCOs do provide them with valuable support which allows frontline policing to remain resilient.

“It should also not be overlooked that last month we recruited 40 new police officers and will be recruiting another 80 next year.”

Visit www.sussex.police.uk for details of how to apply.

Comments (4)

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8:37am Wed 11 Dec 13

Tailgaters Anonymous says...

Happens to the best of us when word-processing.
To(p) should just read 'to' in the heading, maybe?
Happens to the best of us when word-processing. To(p) should just read 'to' in the heading, maybe? Tailgaters Anonymous

10:07am Wed 11 Dec 13

Goldenwight says...

Tailgaters Anonymous wrote:
Happens to the best of us when word-processing. To(p) should just read 'to' in the heading, maybe?
But MOST of us think to use a spellchecker or do some proof-reading. Particularly when producing text for publication.
[quote][p][bold]Tailgaters Anonymous[/bold] wrote: Happens to the best of us when word-processing. To(p) should just read 'to' in the heading, maybe?[/p][/quote]But MOST of us think to use a spellchecker or do some proof-reading. Particularly when producing text for publication. Goldenwight

12:37pm Wed 11 Dec 13

Patsyr says...

It is a pity that these new recruits are called Frontline Officers in the article. They are not.

What a shame these PCSOs cant do the paperwork back at the Police station and free up the actual Police officers to be on the streets dealing with the crimes with the authority that they have as real Police Officers - not just the PCSO who should be used in assistant roles.
It is a pity that these new recruits are called Frontline Officers in the article. They are not. What a shame these PCSOs cant do the paperwork back at the Police station and free up the actual Police officers to be on the streets dealing with the crimes with the authority that they have as real Police Officers - not just the PCSO who should be used in assistant roles. Patsyr

6:01pm Wed 11 Dec 13

LeonBIank666 says...

Whilst I applaud anybody who legally works and not claim benefits, PCSOs really are a waste of space, time and tax payers money.

They have few powers, the local hoodlums laugh in their face, they have very little knowledge of criminal law, are highly unionised (unlike the Police), and are paid far too much for what they really do.

The major problem is they find rather petty crimes (like kids drinking in parks) and the police pick up all the paperwork and arrests etc. So whilst you could argue they do do some good, in essence they are preventing local bobbies doing more worthwhile anti-crime stuff like burglary prevention which is far more beneficial than some chav drinking Lambrini in Queen's Park.
Whilst I applaud anybody who legally works and not claim benefits, PCSOs really are a waste of space, time and tax payers money. They have few powers, the local hoodlums laugh in their face, they have very little knowledge of criminal law, are highly unionised (unlike the Police), and are paid far too much for what they really do. The major problem is they find rather petty crimes (like kids drinking in parks) and the police pick up all the paperwork and arrests etc. So whilst you could argue they do do some good, in essence they are preventing local bobbies doing more worthwhile anti-crime stuff like burglary prevention which is far more beneficial than some chav drinking Lambrini in Queen's Park. LeonBIank666

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