Money still pouring in for little Ollie's Christmas appeal

The Argus: Money still pouring in for little Ollie's Christmas appeal Money still pouring in for little Ollie's Christmas appeal

Money is continuing to pour in to support the campaign to help make a little boy’s Christmas dreams come true.

Individuals and businesses from across Sussex have been donating to The Argus's appeal to help Oliver Poinsignon have an operation which could change his life.

Oliver, five, has cerebral palsy, and his family are trying to raise £52,000 for surgery, follow-up physiotherapy and equipment.

The youngster finds it difficult to get around because of extremely tight and painful muscles in his legs, and this will get worse as he gets older and grows.

The operation, called selective dorsal rhizotomy (SDR) will help him walk more easily and he will have a chance to run, jump and climb like any other little boy.

Family and friends have already raised more than £26,000 towards the cost of surgery which means the operation can be booked, but they still had a long way to go.

The Argus launched a campaign calling on people and businesses across Sussex to help with the final push and hit the £52,000 target.

Oliver lives with his mother Julie Langmaid in Ashurst, near Steyning, and his dad Jean Marc Poinsignon is from Brighton.

Brighton-based industrial electronics company Amplicon Liveline have donated £1,000 to the appeal.

Chief executive Gina Citroni said: “It is a small thing to be able to do that could help make such a difference.”

Brighton and Hove Bus and Coach Company has also said it will donate £300.

SDR surgery is not routinely available on the NHS and because it is so expensive and still relatively new, it will normally only be given the goahead following an application for funding if all other options have been explored.

Oliver’s surgeons in London believe the sooner he has the operation the better, but their application was rejected.

The paper’s charity, The Argus Appeal, is donating £5,000 to help boost the campaign.

Any individuals or businesses interested in making a donation or supporting an event can contact the campaign via Facebook SDR4Oliver or visit www.justgiving.com/SDR4Oliver.

Comments (2)

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11:13am Mon 23 Dec 13

Goldenwight says...

"SDR surgery is not routinely available on the NHS and because it is so expensive and still relatively new, it will normally only be given the goahead following an application for funding if all other options have been explored. "

Argus, that Is TOTALLY untrue, and you well know it! The operation IS routinely available to NHS patients, but only those where it is clinically indicated it will be beneficial. Where did you hear otherwise- not from any part of the NHS I am sure.

But prove me wrong- get another Consultant to make a statement in your paper backing you up, else apologise to me, withdraw your comments and back away with your tail between your legs.

Up to the challenge? No, I thought not. All mouth and no trousers- typical local rag "news" paper.
"SDR surgery is not routinely available on the NHS and because it is so expensive and still relatively new, it will normally only be given the goahead following an application for funding if all other options have been explored. " Argus, that Is TOTALLY untrue, and you well know it! The operation IS routinely available to NHS patients, but only those where it is clinically indicated it will be beneficial. Where did you hear otherwise- not from any part of the NHS I am sure. But prove me wrong- get another Consultant to make a statement in your paper backing you up, else apologise to me, withdraw your comments and back away with your tail between your legs. Up to the challenge? No, I thought not. All mouth and no trousers- typical local rag "news" paper. Goldenwight

5:45pm Wed 1 Jan 14

Auntie CEO says...

Good lord have you completely list the plot - a young boy needs help & the semantics of the NHS are somewhat academic - why not put your hand in your pocket & give some practical help!
Good lord have you completely list the plot - a young boy needs help & the semantics of the NHS are somewhat academic - why not put your hand in your pocket & give some practical help! Auntie CEO

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