Have your say: Does Brighton need a low emission zone?

Could a low emission zone like that in London come to Brighton?

Could a low emission zone like that in London come to Brighton?

First published in News

Buses could be banned form parts of Brighton city centre unless they meet rigourous emissions standards under a council plan.

It would mean only buses meeting the guidelines can enter the zone covering the North Street and Western Road “bus corridor” between Old Steine and Palmeira Square.

Brighton and Hove City Council officers believe the restricted area would help to clampdown on harmful emissions in a city which has high air pollution levels, before hefty European fines are introduced.

But do you think it is a good idea? Does Brighton need a low emissions zone?

Should it include all traffic? Or is it a waste of time?

Let us know using the comment feature below.


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Comments (38)

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11:33am Fri 10 Jan 14

BrightonBrowser says...

Brighton buses have been awarded funding from the Government for the low emission engines. So there will be no financial implications for Brighton and Hove residents. North Street gets very polluted with bus fumes in the summer and I welcome a reduction in air pollution. The scheme is just for buses, not lorries or cars. The plan goes to Council committee next week to be considered by a group of cross party Councillors.
Brighton buses have been awarded funding from the Government for the low emission engines. So there will be no financial implications for Brighton and Hove residents. North Street gets very polluted with bus fumes in the summer and I welcome a reduction in air pollution. The scheme is just for buses, not lorries or cars. The plan goes to Council committee next week to be considered by a group of cross party Councillors. BrightonBrowser
  • Score: 10

11:37am Fri 10 Jan 14

whatevernext2013 says...

BrightonBrowser wrote:
Brighton buses have been awarded funding from the Government for the low emission engines. So there will be no financial implications for Brighton and Hove residents. North Street gets very polluted with bus fumes in the summer and I welcome a reduction in air pollution. The scheme is just for buses, not lorries or cars. The plan goes to Council committee next week to be considered by a group of cross party Councillors.
it maybe better to say its not yet for lorries and cars
[quote][p][bold]BrightonBrowser[/bold] wrote: Brighton buses have been awarded funding from the Government for the low emission engines. So there will be no financial implications for Brighton and Hove residents. North Street gets very polluted with bus fumes in the summer and I welcome a reduction in air pollution. The scheme is just for buses, not lorries or cars. The plan goes to Council committee next week to be considered by a group of cross party Councillors.[/p][/quote]it maybe better to say its not yet for lorries and cars whatevernext2013
  • Score: 6

11:39am Fri 10 Jan 14

RobO. says...

Meanwhile Lewes Road, which is noted for it's poor air quality has been turned into one big traffic jam.

Just like our Green Council have decided to build unnecessary bike lanes rather than improve existing ones, the council have decided to look at emissions away from the area that needs it most.
Meanwhile Lewes Road, which is noted for it's poor air quality has been turned into one big traffic jam. Just like our Green Council have decided to build unnecessary bike lanes rather than improve existing ones, the council have decided to look at emissions away from the area that needs it most. RobO.
  • Score: 17

11:51am Fri 10 Jan 14

STEVE THE RED says...

Of course there should be low Emission Zones. I cannot understand why St James' Street is not included.
Of course there should be low Emission Zones. I cannot understand why St James' Street is not included. STEVE THE RED
  • Score: 5

11:56am Fri 10 Jan 14

Fight_Back says...

I agree with the low emission targets for the good of us all but EU "fines" ? Someone should tell them to Foxtrot Oscar - why do they deserve OUR money ?
I agree with the low emission targets for the good of us all but EU "fines" ? Someone should tell them to Foxtrot Oscar - why do they deserve OUR money ? Fight_Back
  • Score: 9

11:57am Fri 10 Jan 14

Hove Actually says...

Allow cars back into the area, this will spread apart the pollution belching buses that run round empty most of the day...............

(Lights blue touch paper and retire's to a safe distance)
Allow cars back into the area, this will spread apart the pollution belching buses that run round empty most of the day............... (Lights blue touch paper and retire's to a safe distance) Hove Actually
  • Score: 1

11:57am Fri 10 Jan 14

Crystal Ball says...

Could Kings House be made into a bullcr*p-free zone?
Could Kings House be made into a bullcr*p-free zone? Crystal Ball
  • Score: 11

11:58am Fri 10 Jan 14

Brighton1000 says...

Crystal Ball wrote:
Could Kings House be made into a bullcr*p-free zone?
In 2015 yes
[quote][p][bold]Crystal Ball[/bold] wrote: Could Kings House be made into a bullcr*p-free zone?[/p][/quote]In 2015 yes Brighton1000
  • Score: 17

11:59am Fri 10 Jan 14

gheese77 says...

RobO. wrote:
Meanwhile Lewes Road, which is noted for it's poor air quality has been turned into one big traffic jam.

Just like our Green Council have decided to build unnecessary bike lanes rather than improve existing ones, the council have decided to look at emissions away from the area that needs it most.
'unnecessary bike lanes' do not generate air pollution, the high volume of traffic does.
The traffic jams are mainly due to the addition of bus lanes which have halved the number of lanes available to private vehicles.
The Nitrogen dioxide levels on Lewes road have been higher than safe levels for many years, long before the greens ran the council so this is not a new problem.
[quote][p][bold]RobO.[/bold] wrote: Meanwhile Lewes Road, which is noted for it's poor air quality has been turned into one big traffic jam. Just like our Green Council have decided to build unnecessary bike lanes rather than improve existing ones, the council have decided to look at emissions away from the area that needs it most.[/p][/quote]'unnecessary bike lanes' do not generate air pollution, the high volume of traffic does. The traffic jams are mainly due to the addition of bus lanes which have halved the number of lanes available to private vehicles. The Nitrogen dioxide levels on Lewes road have been higher than safe levels for many years, long before the greens ran the council so this is not a new problem. gheese77
  • Score: -4

12:19pm Fri 10 Jan 14

RobO. says...

gheese77 wrote:
RobO. wrote:
Meanwhile Lewes Road, which is noted for it's poor air quality has been turned into one big traffic jam.

Just like our Green Council have decided to build unnecessary bike lanes rather than improve existing ones, the council have decided to look at emissions away from the area that needs it most.
'unnecessary bike lanes' do not generate air pollution, the high volume of traffic does.
The traffic jams are mainly due to the addition of bus lanes which have halved the number of lanes available to private vehicles.
The Nitrogen dioxide levels on Lewes road have been higher than safe levels for many years, long before the greens ran the council so this is not a new problem.
Of course, you could have actually read what I wrote, making an analogy between the Green council's decision to construct little used bike lanes rather than improve existing ones, with the story about implementing a low emission zone outside of the area that needs it most.

How on earth did you take away from my comment that I was suggesting that unnecessary bike lanes were causing air pollution?
[quote][p][bold]gheese77[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]RobO.[/bold] wrote: Meanwhile Lewes Road, which is noted for it's poor air quality has been turned into one big traffic jam. Just like our Green Council have decided to build unnecessary bike lanes rather than improve existing ones, the council have decided to look at emissions away from the area that needs it most.[/p][/quote]'unnecessary bike lanes' do not generate air pollution, the high volume of traffic does. The traffic jams are mainly due to the addition of bus lanes which have halved the number of lanes available to private vehicles. The Nitrogen dioxide levels on Lewes road have been higher than safe levels for many years, long before the greens ran the council so this is not a new problem.[/p][/quote]Of course, you could have actually read what I wrote, making an analogy between the Green council's decision to construct little used bike lanes rather than improve existing ones, with the story about implementing a low emission zone outside of the area that needs it most. How on earth did you take away from my comment that I was suggesting that unnecessary bike lanes were causing air pollution? RobO.
  • Score: 6

12:23pm Fri 10 Jan 14

All 9 of me says...

Considering the amount of brown stuff and hot air that permeates the Bartholomews area, should a low emission zone not be enforced there ?
Considering the amount of brown stuff and hot air that permeates the Bartholomews area, should a low emission zone not be enforced there ? All 9 of me
  • Score: 12

12:29pm Fri 10 Jan 14

Brighton1000 says...

gheese77 wrote:
RobO. wrote:
Meanwhile Lewes Road, which is noted for it's poor air quality has been turned into one big traffic jam.

Just like our Green Council have decided to build unnecessary bike lanes rather than improve existing ones, the council have decided to look at emissions away from the area that needs it most.
'unnecessary bike lanes' do not generate air pollution, the high volume of traffic does.
The traffic jams are mainly due to the addition of bus lanes which have halved the number of lanes available to private vehicles.
The Nitrogen dioxide levels on Lewes road have been higher than safe levels for many years, long before the greens ran the council so this is not a new problem.
Excellent, so lets ignore all issues that have been around for years shall we? They are called the greens, and people have a perception that they wpuld target air pollution as a prioirty. In particular where it has been an issue for years? YOU ARE A JOKE of a council, I cant wait til 2015
[quote][p][bold]gheese77[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]RobO.[/bold] wrote: Meanwhile Lewes Road, which is noted for it's poor air quality has been turned into one big traffic jam. Just like our Green Council have decided to build unnecessary bike lanes rather than improve existing ones, the council have decided to look at emissions away from the area that needs it most.[/p][/quote]'unnecessary bike lanes' do not generate air pollution, the high volume of traffic does. The traffic jams are mainly due to the addition of bus lanes which have halved the number of lanes available to private vehicles. The Nitrogen dioxide levels on Lewes road have been higher than safe levels for many years, long before the greens ran the council so this is not a new problem.[/p][/quote]Excellent, so lets ignore all issues that have been around for years shall we? They are called the greens, and people have a perception that they wpuld target air pollution as a prioirty. In particular where it has been an issue for years? YOU ARE A JOKE of a council, I cant wait til 2015 Brighton1000
  • Score: 12

12:33pm Fri 10 Jan 14

cynic_the says...

gheese77 wrote:
RobO. wrote:
Meanwhile Lewes Road, which is noted for it's poor air quality has been turned into one big traffic jam.

Just like our Green Council have decided to build unnecessary bike lanes rather than improve existing ones, the council have decided to look at emissions away from the area that needs it most.
'unnecessary bike lanes' do not generate air pollution, the high volume of traffic does.
The traffic jams are mainly due to the addition of bus lanes which have halved the number of lanes available to private vehicles.
The Nitrogen dioxide levels on Lewes road have been higher than safe levels for many years, long before the greens ran the council so this is not a new problem.
2 years ago i weighed 15st. i then became addicted to pizza, eating 2 large ones a day. now i weigh 22st.

by your logic ("not a new problem") my pizza addiction has had no impact as i was overweight in the first place.

stop trying to defend the indefensible. the Green council's transport policy has demonstrably increased congestion (and therefore air pollution) in parts of the city, because the public has not reacted in the way the planners 'predicted' (ie: hoped).

i left Brighton station at 945pm last night. a gridlocked sea of taxis, plus about 6 double decker buses at the top of queens road, with between 2 and 10 passengers on each one, 10 litre diesel engines idling away....

but no, it's private car use that's the problem isn't it : /
[quote][p][bold]gheese77[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]RobO.[/bold] wrote: Meanwhile Lewes Road, which is noted for it's poor air quality has been turned into one big traffic jam. Just like our Green Council have decided to build unnecessary bike lanes rather than improve existing ones, the council have decided to look at emissions away from the area that needs it most.[/p][/quote]'unnecessary bike lanes' do not generate air pollution, the high volume of traffic does. The traffic jams are mainly due to the addition of bus lanes which have halved the number of lanes available to private vehicles. The Nitrogen dioxide levels on Lewes road have been higher than safe levels for many years, long before the greens ran the council so this is not a new problem.[/p][/quote]2 years ago i weighed 15st. i then became addicted to pizza, eating 2 large ones a day. now i weigh 22st. by your logic ("not a new problem") my pizza addiction has had no impact as i was overweight in the first place. stop trying to defend the indefensible. the Green council's transport policy has demonstrably increased congestion (and therefore air pollution) in parts of the city, because the public has not reacted in the way the planners 'predicted' (ie: hoped). i left Brighton station at 945pm last night. a gridlocked sea of taxis, plus about 6 double decker buses at the top of queens road, with between 2 and 10 passengers on each one, 10 litre diesel engines idling away.... but no, it's private car use that's the problem isn't it : / cynic_the
  • Score: 11

12:34pm Fri 10 Jan 14

tekniko says...

The air quality is so much cleaner now they have reduced the speed limit to 20mph! It has made such a noticeable difference - NOT.
The air quality is so much cleaner now they have reduced the speed limit to 20mph! It has made such a noticeable difference - NOT. tekniko
  • Score: 9

12:34pm Fri 10 Jan 14

upsidedowntuctuc says...

Get the traffic moving again FULL STOP..
Les than 16 months and Davey is on his Bike (minus helmet as usual)
Get the traffic moving again FULL STOP.. Les than 16 months and Davey is on his Bike (minus helmet as usual) upsidedowntuctuc
  • Score: 7

12:45pm Fri 10 Jan 14

Gribbet says...

RobO. wrote:
Meanwhile Lewes Road, which is noted for it's poor air quality has been turned into one big traffic jam.

Just like our Green Council have decided to build unnecessary bike lanes rather than improve existing ones, the council have decided to look at emissions away from the area that needs it most.
Those bike lanes might be unnecessary for you, but for people who cycle around town, both now and in the future, they're quite necessary.
[quote][p][bold]RobO.[/bold] wrote: Meanwhile Lewes Road, which is noted for it's poor air quality has been turned into one big traffic jam. Just like our Green Council have decided to build unnecessary bike lanes rather than improve existing ones, the council have decided to look at emissions away from the area that needs it most.[/p][/quote]Those bike lanes might be unnecessary for you, but for people who cycle around town, both now and in the future, they're quite necessary. Gribbet
  • Score: -3

12:53pm Fri 10 Jan 14

Gribbet says...

cynic_the wrote:
gheese77 wrote:
RobO. wrote:
Meanwhile Lewes Road, which is noted for it's poor air quality has been turned into one big traffic jam.

Just like our Green Council have decided to build unnecessary bike lanes rather than improve existing ones, the council have decided to look at emissions away from the area that needs it most.
'unnecessary bike lanes' do not generate air pollution, the high volume of traffic does.
The traffic jams are mainly due to the addition of bus lanes which have halved the number of lanes available to private vehicles.
The Nitrogen dioxide levels on Lewes road have been higher than safe levels for many years, long before the greens ran the council so this is not a new problem.
2 years ago i weighed 15st. i then became addicted to pizza, eating 2 large ones a day. now i weigh 22st.

by your logic ("not a new problem") my pizza addiction has had no impact as i was overweight in the first place.

stop trying to defend the indefensible. the Green council's transport policy has demonstrably increased congestion (and therefore air pollution) in parts of the city, because the public has not reacted in the way the planners 'predicted' (ie: hoped).

i left Brighton station at 945pm last night. a gridlocked sea of taxis, plus about 6 double decker buses at the top of queens road, with between 2 and 10 passengers on each one, 10 litre diesel engines idling away....

but no, it's private car use that's the problem isn't it : /
Yep, private car use in the city is definitely a huge part of the problem. A bus with 10 people in it takes up a hell of a lot less space than 10 cars with 10 people in them.
[quote][p][bold]cynic_the[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]gheese77[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]RobO.[/bold] wrote: Meanwhile Lewes Road, which is noted for it's poor air quality has been turned into one big traffic jam. Just like our Green Council have decided to build unnecessary bike lanes rather than improve existing ones, the council have decided to look at emissions away from the area that needs it most.[/p][/quote]'unnecessary bike lanes' do not generate air pollution, the high volume of traffic does. The traffic jams are mainly due to the addition of bus lanes which have halved the number of lanes available to private vehicles. The Nitrogen dioxide levels on Lewes road have been higher than safe levels for many years, long before the greens ran the council so this is not a new problem.[/p][/quote]2 years ago i weighed 15st. i then became addicted to pizza, eating 2 large ones a day. now i weigh 22st. by your logic ("not a new problem") my pizza addiction has had no impact as i was overweight in the first place. stop trying to defend the indefensible. the Green council's transport policy has demonstrably increased congestion (and therefore air pollution) in parts of the city, because the public has not reacted in the way the planners 'predicted' (ie: hoped). i left Brighton station at 945pm last night. a gridlocked sea of taxis, plus about 6 double decker buses at the top of queens road, with between 2 and 10 passengers on each one, 10 litre diesel engines idling away.... but no, it's private car use that's the problem isn't it : /[/p][/quote]Yep, private car use in the city is definitely a huge part of the problem. A bus with 10 people in it takes up a hell of a lot less space than 10 cars with 10 people in them. Gribbet
  • Score: -4

1:14pm Fri 10 Jan 14

gheese77 says...

RobO. wrote:
gheese77 wrote:
RobO. wrote:
Meanwhile Lewes Road, which is noted for it's poor air quality has been turned into one big traffic jam.

Just like our Green Council have decided to build unnecessary bike lanes rather than improve existing ones, the council have decided to look at emissions away from the area that needs it most.
'unnecessary bike lanes' do not generate air pollution, the high volume of traffic does.
The traffic jams are mainly due to the addition of bus lanes which have halved the number of lanes available to private vehicles.
The Nitrogen dioxide levels on Lewes road have been higher than safe levels for many years, long before the greens ran the council so this is not a new problem.
Of course, you could have actually read what I wrote, making an analogy between the Green council's decision to construct little used bike lanes rather than improve existing ones, with the story about implementing a low emission zone outside of the area that needs it most.

How on earth did you take away from my comment that I was suggesting that unnecessary bike lanes were causing air pollution?
I took it that you meant bike lanes caused traffic jams, which in turn caused pollution. My point is that the traffic jams are more caused by the bus lanes
[quote][p][bold]RobO.[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]gheese77[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]RobO.[/bold] wrote: Meanwhile Lewes Road, which is noted for it's poor air quality has been turned into one big traffic jam. Just like our Green Council have decided to build unnecessary bike lanes rather than improve existing ones, the council have decided to look at emissions away from the area that needs it most.[/p][/quote]'unnecessary bike lanes' do not generate air pollution, the high volume of traffic does. The traffic jams are mainly due to the addition of bus lanes which have halved the number of lanes available to private vehicles. The Nitrogen dioxide levels on Lewes road have been higher than safe levels for many years, long before the greens ran the council so this is not a new problem.[/p][/quote]Of course, you could have actually read what I wrote, making an analogy between the Green council's decision to construct little used bike lanes rather than improve existing ones, with the story about implementing a low emission zone outside of the area that needs it most. How on earth did you take away from my comment that I was suggesting that unnecessary bike lanes were causing air pollution?[/p][/quote]I took it that you meant bike lanes caused traffic jams, which in turn caused pollution. My point is that the traffic jams are more caused by the bus lanes gheese77
  • Score: 3

1:22pm Fri 10 Jan 14

gheese77 says...

Brighton1000 wrote:
gheese77 wrote:
RobO. wrote:
Meanwhile Lewes Road, which is noted for it's poor air quality has been turned into one big traffic jam.

Just like our Green Council have decided to build unnecessary bike lanes rather than improve existing ones, the council have decided to look at emissions away from the area that needs it most.
'unnecessary bike lanes' do not generate air pollution, the high volume of traffic does.
The traffic jams are mainly due to the addition of bus lanes which have halved the number of lanes available to private vehicles.
The Nitrogen dioxide levels on Lewes road have been higher than safe levels for many years, long before the greens ran the council so this is not a new problem.
Excellent, so lets ignore all issues that have been around for years shall we? They are called the greens, and people have a perception that they wpuld target air pollution as a prioirty. In particular where it has been an issue for years? YOU ARE A JOKE of a council, I cant wait til 2015
The Lewes road air quality issue hasn't been ignored, the low air quality meant there is a legal obligation for the council to address it (whatever its political colour) . Now you might not like the measures that have been taken, for whatever reason, but thats a different issue
[quote][p][bold]Brighton1000[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]gheese77[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]RobO.[/bold] wrote: Meanwhile Lewes Road, which is noted for it's poor air quality has been turned into one big traffic jam. Just like our Green Council have decided to build unnecessary bike lanes rather than improve existing ones, the council have decided to look at emissions away from the area that needs it most.[/p][/quote]'unnecessary bike lanes' do not generate air pollution, the high volume of traffic does. The traffic jams are mainly due to the addition of bus lanes which have halved the number of lanes available to private vehicles. The Nitrogen dioxide levels on Lewes road have been higher than safe levels for many years, long before the greens ran the council so this is not a new problem.[/p][/quote]Excellent, so lets ignore all issues that have been around for years shall we? They are called the greens, and people have a perception that they wpuld target air pollution as a prioirty. In particular where it has been an issue for years? YOU ARE A JOKE of a council, I cant wait til 2015[/p][/quote]The Lewes road air quality issue hasn't been ignored, the low air quality meant there is a legal obligation for the council to address it (whatever its political colour) . Now you might not like the measures that have been taken, for whatever reason, but thats a different issue gheese77
  • Score: -2

1:27pm Fri 10 Jan 14

Brighton1000 says...

gheese77 wrote:
Brighton1000 wrote:
gheese77 wrote:
RobO. wrote:
Meanwhile Lewes Road, which is noted for it's poor air quality has been turned into one big traffic jam.

Just like our Green Council have decided to build unnecessary bike lanes rather than improve existing ones, the council have decided to look at emissions away from the area that needs it most.
'unnecessary bike lanes' do not generate air pollution, the high volume of traffic does.
The traffic jams are mainly due to the addition of bus lanes which have halved the number of lanes available to private vehicles.
The Nitrogen dioxide levels on Lewes road have been higher than safe levels for many years, long before the greens ran the council so this is not a new problem.
Excellent, so lets ignore all issues that have been around for years shall we? They are called the greens, and people have a perception that they wpuld target air pollution as a prioirty. In particular where it has been an issue for years? YOU ARE A JOKE of a council, I cant wait til 2015
The Lewes road air quality issue hasn't been ignored, the low air quality meant there is a legal obligation for the council to address it (whatever its political colour) . Now you might not like the measures that have been taken, for whatever reason, but thats a different issue
Perhaps because they havent dropped? And there is now a constant traffic jam. You can spin it all you like, they are the 2 facts. If you dont believe me get down there take a look and a nice long deep breath
[quote][p][bold]gheese77[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Brighton1000[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]gheese77[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]RobO.[/bold] wrote: Meanwhile Lewes Road, which is noted for it's poor air quality has been turned into one big traffic jam. Just like our Green Council have decided to build unnecessary bike lanes rather than improve existing ones, the council have decided to look at emissions away from the area that needs it most.[/p][/quote]'unnecessary bike lanes' do not generate air pollution, the high volume of traffic does. The traffic jams are mainly due to the addition of bus lanes which have halved the number of lanes available to private vehicles. The Nitrogen dioxide levels on Lewes road have been higher than safe levels for many years, long before the greens ran the council so this is not a new problem.[/p][/quote]Excellent, so lets ignore all issues that have been around for years shall we? They are called the greens, and people have a perception that they wpuld target air pollution as a prioirty. In particular where it has been an issue for years? YOU ARE A JOKE of a council, I cant wait til 2015[/p][/quote]The Lewes road air quality issue hasn't been ignored, the low air quality meant there is a legal obligation for the council to address it (whatever its political colour) . Now you might not like the measures that have been taken, for whatever reason, but thats a different issue[/p][/quote]Perhaps because they havent dropped? And there is now a constant traffic jam. You can spin it all you like, they are the 2 facts. If you dont believe me get down there take a look and a nice long deep breath Brighton1000
  • Score: 8

1:32pm Fri 10 Jan 14

cynic_the says...

Gribbet wrote:
cynic_the wrote:
gheese77 wrote:
RobO. wrote:
Meanwhile Lewes Road, which is noted for it's poor air quality has been turned into one big traffic jam.

Just like our Green Council have decided to build unnecessary bike lanes rather than improve existing ones, the council have decided to look at emissions away from the area that needs it most.
'unnecessary bike lanes' do not generate air pollution, the high volume of traffic does.
The traffic jams are mainly due to the addition of bus lanes which have halved the number of lanes available to private vehicles.
The Nitrogen dioxide levels on Lewes road have been higher than safe levels for many years, long before the greens ran the council so this is not a new problem.
2 years ago i weighed 15st. i then became addicted to pizza, eating 2 large ones a day. now i weigh 22st.

by your logic ("not a new problem") my pizza addiction has had no impact as i was overweight in the first place.

stop trying to defend the indefensible. the Green council's transport policy has demonstrably increased congestion (and therefore air pollution) in parts of the city, because the public has not reacted in the way the planners 'predicted' (ie: hoped).

i left Brighton station at 945pm last night. a gridlocked sea of taxis, plus about 6 double decker buses at the top of queens road, with between 2 and 10 passengers on each one, 10 litre diesel engines idling away....

but no, it's private car use that's the problem isn't it : /
Yep, private car use in the city is definitely a huge part of the problem. A bus with 10 people in it takes up a hell of a lot less space than 10 cars with 10 people in them.
space, yes, pollution, marginal.

what about the bus with 2 people in? and the one with 'sorry i'm not in service'? and the 30-odd taxis? all empty. all idling. the only private cars visible were queuing up terminus road because they couldn't get past the public transport gridlock...

the whole point is that the worst polluted places in the city (north street and churchill square according to the survey in the summer that i assume led to this suggestion), are closed to private cars.

people seem to forget that each private car only produces emissions for a small part of each day, but all the buses will be running 6am - midnight (at least) 7 days a week, regardless of how many passengers are on them.

it's good to see that it is starting to be acknowledged that those buses pump out a lot of emissions. sadly, forcing them to upgrade will push prices up even higher. and they'll still be stuck in traffic.
[quote][p][bold]Gribbet[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]cynic_the[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]gheese77[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]RobO.[/bold] wrote: Meanwhile Lewes Road, which is noted for it's poor air quality has been turned into one big traffic jam. Just like our Green Council have decided to build unnecessary bike lanes rather than improve existing ones, the council have decided to look at emissions away from the area that needs it most.[/p][/quote]'unnecessary bike lanes' do not generate air pollution, the high volume of traffic does. The traffic jams are mainly due to the addition of bus lanes which have halved the number of lanes available to private vehicles. The Nitrogen dioxide levels on Lewes road have been higher than safe levels for many years, long before the greens ran the council so this is not a new problem.[/p][/quote]2 years ago i weighed 15st. i then became addicted to pizza, eating 2 large ones a day. now i weigh 22st. by your logic ("not a new problem") my pizza addiction has had no impact as i was overweight in the first place. stop trying to defend the indefensible. the Green council's transport policy has demonstrably increased congestion (and therefore air pollution) in parts of the city, because the public has not reacted in the way the planners 'predicted' (ie: hoped). i left Brighton station at 945pm last night. a gridlocked sea of taxis, plus about 6 double decker buses at the top of queens road, with between 2 and 10 passengers on each one, 10 litre diesel engines idling away.... but no, it's private car use that's the problem isn't it : /[/p][/quote]Yep, private car use in the city is definitely a huge part of the problem. A bus with 10 people in it takes up a hell of a lot less space than 10 cars with 10 people in them.[/p][/quote]space, yes, pollution, marginal. what about the bus with 2 people in? and the one with 'sorry i'm not in service'? and the 30-odd taxis? all empty. all idling. the only private cars visible were queuing up terminus road because they couldn't get past the public transport gridlock... the whole point is that the worst polluted places in the city (north street and churchill square according to the survey in the summer that i assume led to this suggestion), are closed to private cars. people seem to forget that each private car only produces emissions for a small part of each day, but all the buses will be running 6am - midnight (at least) 7 days a week, regardless of how many passengers are on them. it's good to see that it is starting to be acknowledged that those buses pump out a lot of emissions. sadly, forcing them to upgrade will push prices up even higher. and they'll still be stuck in traffic. cynic_the
  • Score: 4

1:57pm Fri 10 Jan 14

NickBtn says...

The North Street area is so polluted by buses as virtually all routes run this way. Some re-organisation of routes could help. If some of the cross city routes could run north and south of this street there would be less pollution and less impact from any accidents/issues on this road

If carefully done this could lead to faster bus trips, more routes and less pollution. It would take creativity and time. So a challenge!
The North Street area is so polluted by buses as virtually all routes run this way. Some re-organisation of routes could help. If some of the cross city routes could run north and south of this street there would be less pollution and less impact from any accidents/issues on this road If carefully done this could lead to faster bus trips, more routes and less pollution. It would take creativity and time. So a challenge! NickBtn
  • Score: 3

2:08pm Fri 10 Jan 14

gheese77 says...

Brighton1000 wrote:
gheese77 wrote:
Brighton1000 wrote:
gheese77 wrote:
RobO. wrote:
Meanwhile Lewes Road, which is noted for it's poor air quality has been turned into one big traffic jam.

Just like our Green Council have decided to build unnecessary bike lanes rather than improve existing ones, the council have decided to look at emissions away from the area that needs it most.
'unnecessary bike lanes' do not generate air pollution, the high volume of traffic does.
The traffic jams are mainly due to the addition of bus lanes which have halved the number of lanes available to private vehicles.
The Nitrogen dioxide levels on Lewes road have been higher than safe levels for many years, long before the greens ran the council so this is not a new problem.
Excellent, so lets ignore all issues that have been around for years shall we? They are called the greens, and people have a perception that they wpuld target air pollution as a prioirty. In particular where it has been an issue for years? YOU ARE A JOKE of a council, I cant wait til 2015
The Lewes road air quality issue hasn't been ignored, the low air quality meant there is a legal obligation for the council to address it (whatever its political colour) . Now you might not like the measures that have been taken, for whatever reason, but thats a different issue
Perhaps because they havent dropped? And there is now a constant traffic jam. You can spin it all you like, they are the 2 facts. If you dont believe me get down there take a look and a nice long deep breath
I sort of agree with you, I don't think its worked & I don't know if the air quality's improved. But remember our definition or what works depends upon our lifestyle. I make 95 % of my journeys by bicycle the other 5 % by car and very very rarely travel by bus, so for me bus lanes aren't important but for some people they are. Given that something has to be done, personally I would introduce some sort of congestion charge for these areas to discourage drivers from out of town. I would be interested to know how you would fix the problem?
Also theres no need to use SHOUTY CAPS on me as if I am some sort of green party rep, I am not.
[quote][p][bold]Brighton1000[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]gheese77[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Brighton1000[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]gheese77[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]RobO.[/bold] wrote: Meanwhile Lewes Road, which is noted for it's poor air quality has been turned into one big traffic jam. Just like our Green Council have decided to build unnecessary bike lanes rather than improve existing ones, the council have decided to look at emissions away from the area that needs it most.[/p][/quote]'unnecessary bike lanes' do not generate air pollution, the high volume of traffic does. The traffic jams are mainly due to the addition of bus lanes which have halved the number of lanes available to private vehicles. The Nitrogen dioxide levels on Lewes road have been higher than safe levels for many years, long before the greens ran the council so this is not a new problem.[/p][/quote]Excellent, so lets ignore all issues that have been around for years shall we? They are called the greens, and people have a perception that they wpuld target air pollution as a prioirty. In particular where it has been an issue for years? YOU ARE A JOKE of a council, I cant wait til 2015[/p][/quote]The Lewes road air quality issue hasn't been ignored, the low air quality meant there is a legal obligation for the council to address it (whatever its political colour) . Now you might not like the measures that have been taken, for whatever reason, but thats a different issue[/p][/quote]Perhaps because they havent dropped? And there is now a constant traffic jam. You can spin it all you like, they are the 2 facts. If you dont believe me get down there take a look and a nice long deep breath[/p][/quote]I sort of agree with you, I don't think its worked & I don't know if the air quality's improved. But remember our definition or what works depends upon our lifestyle. I make 95 % of my journeys by bicycle the other 5 % by car and very very rarely travel by bus, so for me bus lanes aren't important but for some people they are. Given that something has to be done, personally I would introduce some sort of congestion charge for these areas to discourage drivers from out of town. I would be interested to know how you would fix the problem? Also theres no need to use SHOUTY CAPS on me as if I am some sort of green party rep, I am not. gheese77
  • Score: -2

2:15pm Fri 10 Jan 14

her professional says...

Brighton1000 wrote:
Crystal Ball wrote:
Could Kings House be made into a bullcr*p-free zone?
In 2015 yes
Who would that be then?
[quote][p][bold]Brighton1000[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Crystal Ball[/bold] wrote: Could Kings House be made into a bullcr*p-free zone?[/p][/quote]In 2015 yes[/p][/quote]Who would that be then? her professional
  • Score: 0

3:57pm Fri 10 Jan 14

Darwinism says...

cynic_the wrote:
Gribbet wrote:
cynic_the wrote:
gheese77 wrote:
RobO. wrote: Meanwhile Lewes Road, which is noted for it's poor air quality has been turned into one big traffic jam. Just like our Green Council have decided to build unnecessary bike lanes rather than improve existing ones, the council have decided to look at emissions away from the area that needs it most.
'unnecessary bike lanes' do not generate air pollution, the high volume of traffic does. The traffic jams are mainly due to the addition of bus lanes which have halved the number of lanes available to private vehicles. The Nitrogen dioxide levels on Lewes road have been higher than safe levels for many years, long before the greens ran the council so this is not a new problem.
2 years ago i weighed 15st. i then became addicted to pizza, eating 2 large ones a day. now i weigh 22st. by your logic ("not a new problem") my pizza addiction has had no impact as i was overweight in the first place. stop trying to defend the indefensible. the Green council's transport policy has demonstrably increased congestion (and therefore air pollution) in parts of the city, because the public has not reacted in the way the planners 'predicted' (ie: hoped). i left Brighton station at 945pm last night. a gridlocked sea of taxis, plus about 6 double decker buses at the top of queens road, with between 2 and 10 passengers on each one, 10 litre diesel engines idling away.... but no, it's private car use that's the problem isn't it : /
Yep, private car use in the city is definitely a huge part of the problem. A bus with 10 people in it takes up a hell of a lot less space than 10 cars with 10 people in them.
space, yes, pollution, marginal. what about the bus with 2 people in? and the one with 'sorry i'm not in service'? and the 30-odd taxis? all empty. all idling. the only private cars visible were queuing up terminus road because they couldn't get past the public transport gridlock... the whole point is that the worst polluted places in the city (north street and churchill square according to the survey in the summer that i assume led to this suggestion), are closed to private cars. people seem to forget that each private car only produces emissions for a small part of each day, but all the buses will be running 6am - midnight (at least) 7 days a week, regardless of how many passengers are on them. it's good to see that it is starting to be acknowledged that those buses pump out a lot of emissions. sadly, forcing them to upgrade will push prices up even higher. and they'll still be stuck in traffic.
So what we are saying then is air quality wise it doesn't matter about cars being in a queue because they don't add much to the pollution levels. It's important that the more polluting buses are kept moving so what we need are more bus lanes then?
[quote][p][bold]cynic_the[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Gribbet[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]cynic_the[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]gheese77[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]RobO.[/bold] wrote: Meanwhile Lewes Road, which is noted for it's poor air quality has been turned into one big traffic jam. Just like our Green Council have decided to build unnecessary bike lanes rather than improve existing ones, the council have decided to look at emissions away from the area that needs it most.[/p][/quote]'unnecessary bike lanes' do not generate air pollution, the high volume of traffic does. The traffic jams are mainly due to the addition of bus lanes which have halved the number of lanes available to private vehicles. The Nitrogen dioxide levels on Lewes road have been higher than safe levels for many years, long before the greens ran the council so this is not a new problem.[/p][/quote]2 years ago i weighed 15st. i then became addicted to pizza, eating 2 large ones a day. now i weigh 22st. by your logic ("not a new problem") my pizza addiction has had no impact as i was overweight in the first place. stop trying to defend the indefensible. the Green council's transport policy has demonstrably increased congestion (and therefore air pollution) in parts of the city, because the public has not reacted in the way the planners 'predicted' (ie: hoped). i left Brighton station at 945pm last night. a gridlocked sea of taxis, plus about 6 double decker buses at the top of queens road, with between 2 and 10 passengers on each one, 10 litre diesel engines idling away.... but no, it's private car use that's the problem isn't it : /[/p][/quote]Yep, private car use in the city is definitely a huge part of the problem. A bus with 10 people in it takes up a hell of a lot less space than 10 cars with 10 people in them.[/p][/quote]space, yes, pollution, marginal. what about the bus with 2 people in? and the one with 'sorry i'm not in service'? and the 30-odd taxis? all empty. all idling. the only private cars visible were queuing up terminus road because they couldn't get past the public transport gridlock... the whole point is that the worst polluted places in the city (north street and churchill square according to the survey in the summer that i assume led to this suggestion), are closed to private cars. people seem to forget that each private car only produces emissions for a small part of each day, but all the buses will be running 6am - midnight (at least) 7 days a week, regardless of how many passengers are on them. it's good to see that it is starting to be acknowledged that those buses pump out a lot of emissions. sadly, forcing them to upgrade will push prices up even higher. and they'll still be stuck in traffic.[/p][/quote]So what we are saying then is air quality wise it doesn't matter about cars being in a queue because they don't add much to the pollution levels. It's important that the more polluting buses are kept moving so what we need are more bus lanes then? Darwinism
  • Score: -3

4:23pm Fri 10 Jan 14

rayellerton says...

We had at one time electric buses but someone decided to get rid of them....change isnt always for the good
We had at one time electric buses but someone decided to get rid of them....change isnt always for the good rayellerton
  • Score: 5

4:55pm Fri 10 Jan 14

biker brighton says...

BrightonBrowser wrote:
Brighton buses have been awarded funding from the Government for the low emission engines. So there will be no financial implications for Brighton and Hove residents. North Street gets very polluted with bus fumes in the summer and I welcome a reduction in air pollution. The scheme is just for buses, not lorries or cars. The plan goes to Council committee next week to be considered by a group of cross party Councillors.
how about all the taxis with there running engines there was a law that not ment to leave an engine running for longer than 2 mins if standing still
[quote][p][bold]BrightonBrowser[/bold] wrote: Brighton buses have been awarded funding from the Government for the low emission engines. So there will be no financial implications for Brighton and Hove residents. North Street gets very polluted with bus fumes in the summer and I welcome a reduction in air pollution. The scheme is just for buses, not lorries or cars. The plan goes to Council committee next week to be considered by a group of cross party Councillors.[/p][/quote]how about all the taxis with there running engines there was a law that not ment to leave an engine running for longer than 2 mins if standing still biker brighton
  • Score: 3

5:32pm Fri 10 Jan 14

cynic_the says...

Darwinism wrote:
cynic_the wrote:
Gribbet wrote:
cynic_the wrote:
gheese77 wrote:
RobO. wrote: Meanwhile Lewes Road, which is noted for it's poor air quality has been turned into one big traffic jam. Just like our Green Council have decided to build unnecessary bike lanes rather than improve existing ones, the council have decided to look at emissions away from the area that needs it most.
'unnecessary bike lanes' do not generate air pollution, the high volume of traffic does. The traffic jams are mainly due to the addition of bus lanes which have halved the number of lanes available to private vehicles. The Nitrogen dioxide levels on Lewes road have been higher than safe levels for many years, long before the greens ran the council so this is not a new problem.
2 years ago i weighed 15st. i then became addicted to pizza, eating 2 large ones a day. now i weigh 22st. by your logic ("not a new problem") my pizza addiction has had no impact as i was overweight in the first place. stop trying to defend the indefensible. the Green council's transport policy has demonstrably increased congestion (and therefore air pollution) in parts of the city, because the public has not reacted in the way the planners 'predicted' (ie: hoped). i left Brighton station at 945pm last night. a gridlocked sea of taxis, plus about 6 double decker buses at the top of queens road, with between 2 and 10 passengers on each one, 10 litre diesel engines idling away.... but no, it's private car use that's the problem isn't it : /
Yep, private car use in the city is definitely a huge part of the problem. A bus with 10 people in it takes up a hell of a lot less space than 10 cars with 10 people in them.
space, yes, pollution, marginal. what about the bus with 2 people in? and the one with 'sorry i'm not in service'? and the 30-odd taxis? all empty. all idling. the only private cars visible were queuing up terminus road because they couldn't get past the public transport gridlock... the whole point is that the worst polluted places in the city (north street and churchill square according to the survey in the summer that i assume led to this suggestion), are closed to private cars. people seem to forget that each private car only produces emissions for a small part of each day, but all the buses will be running 6am - midnight (at least) 7 days a week, regardless of how many passengers are on them. it's good to see that it is starting to be acknowledged that those buses pump out a lot of emissions. sadly, forcing them to upgrade will push prices up even higher. and they'll still be stuck in traffic.
So what we are saying then is air quality wise it doesn't matter about cars being in a queue because they don't add much to the pollution levels. It's important that the more polluting buses are kept moving so what we need are more bus lanes then?
Sure. Or less buses.

Even better, we could have an integrated transport policy designed to reduce congestion for all road users, as opposed to one designed to change people's behaviour by causing gridlock for motorists.

But that's not the Green way is it?
[quote][p][bold]Darwinism[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]cynic_the[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Gribbet[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]cynic_the[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]gheese77[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]RobO.[/bold] wrote: Meanwhile Lewes Road, which is noted for it's poor air quality has been turned into one big traffic jam. Just like our Green Council have decided to build unnecessary bike lanes rather than improve existing ones, the council have decided to look at emissions away from the area that needs it most.[/p][/quote]'unnecessary bike lanes' do not generate air pollution, the high volume of traffic does. The traffic jams are mainly due to the addition of bus lanes which have halved the number of lanes available to private vehicles. The Nitrogen dioxide levels on Lewes road have been higher than safe levels for many years, long before the greens ran the council so this is not a new problem.[/p][/quote]2 years ago i weighed 15st. i then became addicted to pizza, eating 2 large ones a day. now i weigh 22st. by your logic ("not a new problem") my pizza addiction has had no impact as i was overweight in the first place. stop trying to defend the indefensible. the Green council's transport policy has demonstrably increased congestion (and therefore air pollution) in parts of the city, because the public has not reacted in the way the planners 'predicted' (ie: hoped). i left Brighton station at 945pm last night. a gridlocked sea of taxis, plus about 6 double decker buses at the top of queens road, with between 2 and 10 passengers on each one, 10 litre diesel engines idling away.... but no, it's private car use that's the problem isn't it : /[/p][/quote]Yep, private car use in the city is definitely a huge part of the problem. A bus with 10 people in it takes up a hell of a lot less space than 10 cars with 10 people in them.[/p][/quote]space, yes, pollution, marginal. what about the bus with 2 people in? and the one with 'sorry i'm not in service'? and the 30-odd taxis? all empty. all idling. the only private cars visible were queuing up terminus road because they couldn't get past the public transport gridlock... the whole point is that the worst polluted places in the city (north street and churchill square according to the survey in the summer that i assume led to this suggestion), are closed to private cars. people seem to forget that each private car only produces emissions for a small part of each day, but all the buses will be running 6am - midnight (at least) 7 days a week, regardless of how many passengers are on them. it's good to see that it is starting to be acknowledged that those buses pump out a lot of emissions. sadly, forcing them to upgrade will push prices up even higher. and they'll still be stuck in traffic.[/p][/quote]So what we are saying then is air quality wise it doesn't matter about cars being in a queue because they don't add much to the pollution levels. It's important that the more polluting buses are kept moving so what we need are more bus lanes then?[/p][/quote]Sure. Or less buses. Even better, we could have an integrated transport policy designed to reduce congestion for all road users, as opposed to one designed to change people's behaviour by causing gridlock for motorists. But that's not the Green way is it? cynic_the
  • Score: 1

6:06pm Fri 10 Jan 14

melee says...

So have I got this right? We are 'encouraged' to use public transport by high parking fees, bus lanes clogging up traffic and all the rest. Now there will be places where a number of buses won't be able to go either? How many buses will this affect, does anyone know?
As for the EU fine, I'm fed up to the back teeth of hearing about all the things we can and can't do because of a 'fine'. In many cases it would be cheaper to pay the fine and carry on regardless. Or just refuse to pay it. Wonder what they'd do then exactly? Perhaps they'd chuck us out!
So have I got this right? We are 'encouraged' to use public transport by high parking fees, bus lanes clogging up traffic and all the rest. Now there will be places where a number of buses won't be able to go either? How many buses will this affect, does anyone know? As for the EU fine, I'm fed up to the back teeth of hearing about all the things we can and can't do because of a 'fine'. In many cases it would be cheaper to pay the fine and carry on regardless. Or just refuse to pay it. Wonder what they'd do then exactly? Perhaps they'd chuck us out! melee
  • Score: 5

7:12pm Fri 10 Jan 14

BrightonHoveboy says...

gheese77 wrote:
RobO. wrote:
Meanwhile Lewes Road, which is noted for it's poor air quality has been turned into one big traffic jam.

Just like our Green Council have decided to build unnecessary bike lanes rather than improve existing ones, the council have decided to look at emissions away from the area that needs it most.
'unnecessary bike lanes' do not generate air pollution, the high volume of traffic does.
The traffic jams are mainly due to the addition of bus lanes which have halved the number of lanes available to private vehicles.
The Nitrogen dioxide levels on Lewes road have been higher than safe levels for many years, long before the greens ran the council so this is not a new problem.
The pollution and congestion created by the cycle lanes in Old Shoreham Road is enormous. All traffic is near stationary now since these monstrosities were installed. At the very least the north side should be reinstated as a road and the cycle lane installed on the large enough, little used pavement.
[quote][p][bold]gheese77[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]RobO.[/bold] wrote: Meanwhile Lewes Road, which is noted for it's poor air quality has been turned into one big traffic jam. Just like our Green Council have decided to build unnecessary bike lanes rather than improve existing ones, the council have decided to look at emissions away from the area that needs it most.[/p][/quote]'unnecessary bike lanes' do not generate air pollution, the high volume of traffic does. The traffic jams are mainly due to the addition of bus lanes which have halved the number of lanes available to private vehicles. The Nitrogen dioxide levels on Lewes road have been higher than safe levels for many years, long before the greens ran the council so this is not a new problem.[/p][/quote]The pollution and congestion created by the cycle lanes in Old Shoreham Road is enormous. All traffic is near stationary now since these monstrosities were installed. At the very least the north side should be reinstated as a road and the cycle lane installed on the large enough, little used pavement. BrightonHoveboy
  • Score: 3

7:15pm Fri 10 Jan 14

BrightonHoveboy says...

To stop pollution in our town we need to remove politicians and their indiginous cronies in the council (who cannot be removed because of the unions). That willk remove the vast stench that they emit
To stop pollution in our town we need to remove politicians and their indiginous cronies in the council (who cannot be removed because of the unions). That willk remove the vast stench that they emit BrightonHoveboy
  • Score: 0

8:03pm Fri 10 Jan 14

Bill in Hanover says...

The Greens targetted car drivers first, now they are targetting the buses, presumably the next steps will be to put a toll on cycle lanes then start selling Residents Pedestrian permits.
The Greens targetted car drivers first, now they are targetting the buses, presumably the next steps will be to put a toll on cycle lanes then start selling Residents Pedestrian permits. Bill in Hanover
  • Score: 5

10:35pm Fri 10 Jan 14

HJarrs says...

Lots of heat and not much light by the moanerati as usual.

The pollution levels have been at a similarly unacceptably high level over most of the City for years, probably decades for anyone who cares to do 2 minutes of research. I am pleased that we finally have a city centre low emissions zone and that, at last, some real action is to be taken to address the City's unacceptably high pollution levels. It should have happened years ago, the centre of London became a LEZ in 2008 (where were the moanerati in Brighton then eh? Er...in power!).

Having got a LEZ, I understand that the council is able to support and attract grants for emission reduction. Already we see B&H buses has got a government grant for the retroffiting of some of the fleet to reduce emissions, but there is also a better chance to influence the choice of buses for the proposals of major bus service improvements in the City Plan. If you want to make a radical difference to pollution in the city, you must reduce the number of internal combustion engines significantly. An LEZ will make the argument for funding of a contactless electric bus system (the successor to the trolly bus) that bit easier. This would encourage yet more people out of their cars as well as removing diesel buses from the roads. Lets get behind the council and keep them moving the transport agenda on.
Lots of heat and not much light by the moanerati as usual. The pollution levels have been at a similarly unacceptably high level over most of the City for years, probably decades for anyone who cares to do 2 minutes of research. I am pleased that we finally have a city centre low emissions zone and that, at last, some real action is to be taken to address the City's unacceptably high pollution levels. It should have happened years ago, the centre of London became a LEZ in 2008 (where were the moanerati in Brighton then eh? Er...in power!). Having got a LEZ, I understand that the council is able to support and attract grants for emission reduction. Already we see B&H buses has got a government grant for the retroffiting of some of the fleet to reduce emissions, but there is also a better chance to influence the choice of buses for the proposals of major bus service improvements in the City Plan. If you want to make a radical difference to pollution in the city, you must reduce the number of internal combustion engines significantly. An LEZ will make the argument for funding of a contactless electric bus system (the successor to the trolly bus) that bit easier. This would encourage yet more people out of their cars as well as removing diesel buses from the roads. Lets get behind the council and keep them moving the transport agenda on. HJarrs
  • Score: -4

11:49pm Fri 10 Jan 14

Alison Smith says...

no
no Alison Smith
  • Score: -2

8:16am Sat 11 Jan 14

Gribbet says...

cynic_the wrote:
Gribbet wrote:
cynic_the wrote:
gheese77 wrote:
RobO. wrote:
Meanwhile Lewes Road, which is noted for it's poor air quality has been turned into one big traffic jam.

Just like our Green Council have decided to build unnecessary bike lanes rather than improve existing ones, the council have decided to look at emissions away from the area that needs it most.
'unnecessary bike lanes' do not generate air pollution, the high volume of traffic does.
The traffic jams are mainly due to the addition of bus lanes which have halved the number of lanes available to private vehicles.
The Nitrogen dioxide levels on Lewes road have been higher than safe levels for many years, long before the greens ran the council so this is not a new problem.
2 years ago i weighed 15st. i then became addicted to pizza, eating 2 large ones a day. now i weigh 22st.

by your logic ("not a new problem") my pizza addiction has had no impact as i was overweight in the first place.

stop trying to defend the indefensible. the Green council's transport policy has demonstrably increased congestion (and therefore air pollution) in parts of the city, because the public has not reacted in the way the planners 'predicted' (ie: hoped).

i left Brighton station at 945pm last night. a gridlocked sea of taxis, plus about 6 double decker buses at the top of queens road, with between 2 and 10 passengers on each one, 10 litre diesel engines idling away....

but no, it's private car use that's the problem isn't it : /
Yep, private car use in the city is definitely a huge part of the problem. A bus with 10 people in it takes up a hell of a lot less space than 10 cars with 10 people in them.
space, yes, pollution, marginal.

what about the bus with 2 people in? and the one with 'sorry i'm not in service'? and the 30-odd taxis? all empty. all idling. the only private cars visible were queuing up terminus road because they couldn't get past the public transport gridlock...

the whole point is that the worst polluted places in the city (north street and churchill square according to the survey in the summer that i assume led to this suggestion), are closed to private cars.

people seem to forget that each private car only produces emissions for a small part of each day, but all the buses will be running 6am - midnight (at least) 7 days a week, regardless of how many passengers are on them.

it's good to see that it is starting to be acknowledged that those buses pump out a lot of emissions. sadly, forcing them to upgrade will push prices up even higher. and they'll still be stuck in traffic.
Busses, taxis, private cars... they all cause air pollution, so your argument is a bit pot-and-kettle at the end of the day.
[quote][p][bold]cynic_the[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Gribbet[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]cynic_the[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]gheese77[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]RobO.[/bold] wrote: Meanwhile Lewes Road, which is noted for it's poor air quality has been turned into one big traffic jam. Just like our Green Council have decided to build unnecessary bike lanes rather than improve existing ones, the council have decided to look at emissions away from the area that needs it most.[/p][/quote]'unnecessary bike lanes' do not generate air pollution, the high volume of traffic does. The traffic jams are mainly due to the addition of bus lanes which have halved the number of lanes available to private vehicles. The Nitrogen dioxide levels on Lewes road have been higher than safe levels for many years, long before the greens ran the council so this is not a new problem.[/p][/quote]2 years ago i weighed 15st. i then became addicted to pizza, eating 2 large ones a day. now i weigh 22st. by your logic ("not a new problem") my pizza addiction has had no impact as i was overweight in the first place. stop trying to defend the indefensible. the Green council's transport policy has demonstrably increased congestion (and therefore air pollution) in parts of the city, because the public has not reacted in the way the planners 'predicted' (ie: hoped). i left Brighton station at 945pm last night. a gridlocked sea of taxis, plus about 6 double decker buses at the top of queens road, with between 2 and 10 passengers on each one, 10 litre diesel engines idling away.... but no, it's private car use that's the problem isn't it : /[/p][/quote]Yep, private car use in the city is definitely a huge part of the problem. A bus with 10 people in it takes up a hell of a lot less space than 10 cars with 10 people in them.[/p][/quote]space, yes, pollution, marginal. what about the bus with 2 people in? and the one with 'sorry i'm not in service'? and the 30-odd taxis? all empty. all idling. the only private cars visible were queuing up terminus road because they couldn't get past the public transport gridlock... the whole point is that the worst polluted places in the city (north street and churchill square according to the survey in the summer that i assume led to this suggestion), are closed to private cars. people seem to forget that each private car only produces emissions for a small part of each day, but all the buses will be running 6am - midnight (at least) 7 days a week, regardless of how many passengers are on them. it's good to see that it is starting to be acknowledged that those buses pump out a lot of emissions. sadly, forcing them to upgrade will push prices up even higher. and they'll still be stuck in traffic.[/p][/quote]Busses, taxis, private cars... they all cause air pollution, so your argument is a bit pot-and-kettle at the end of the day. Gribbet
  • Score: 0

11:32am Sun 12 Jan 14

B&H resident says...

A side issue and according to the article not yet in scope, but now a future worry to me: the London LEZ bans me from driving my older vw diesel camper van inside greater London. I live in central Brighton and if applied here this would scupper my van. And of course for tourists too..
A side issue and according to the article not yet in scope, but now a future worry to me: the London LEZ bans me from driving my older vw diesel camper van inside greater London. I live in central Brighton and if applied here this would scupper my van. And of course for tourists too.. B&H resident
  • Score: 0

5:54pm Sun 12 Jan 14

djwbrighton says...

All buses and taxi being hybrid would help ,switching to battery power only use in the centre of town. Electric buses are now in use in Milton Keynes (maybe they don't have hills?) so the technology is available too make the change. Maybe an over head and/or under the road surface electricity supply in the centre of town could power the buses/taxis. The technology is there.
All buses and taxi being hybrid would help ,switching to battery power only use in the centre of town. Electric buses are now in use in Milton Keynes (maybe they don't have hills?) so the technology is available too make the change. Maybe an over head and/or under the road surface electricity supply in the centre of town could power the buses/taxis. The technology is there. djwbrighton
  • Score: 1

8:09am Wed 15 Jan 14

Dealing with idiots says...

HJarrs wrote:
Lots of heat and not much light by the moanerati as usual.

The pollution levels have been at a similarly unacceptably high level over most of the City for years, probably decades for anyone who cares to do 2 minutes of research. I am pleased that we finally have a city centre low emissions zone and that, at last, some real action is to be taken to address the City's unacceptably high pollution levels. It should have happened years ago, the centre of London became a LEZ in 2008 (where were the moanerati in Brighton then eh? Er...in power!).

Having got a LEZ, I understand that the council is able to support and attract grants for emission reduction. Already we see B&H buses has got a government grant for the retroffiting of some of the fleet to reduce emissions, but there is also a better chance to influence the choice of buses for the proposals of major bus service improvements in the City Plan. If you want to make a radical difference to pollution in the city, you must reduce the number of internal combustion engines significantly. An LEZ will make the argument for funding of a contactless electric bus system (the successor to the trolly bus) that bit easier. This would encourage yet more people out of their cars as well as removing diesel buses from the roads. Lets get behind the council and keep them moving the transport agenda on.
And as usual you will be sending in an invoice for your green consultancy. Jason won't always be there to subsidize your trough although he can provide you with a P45. Roll on 5/5/15.
[quote][p][bold]HJarrs[/bold] wrote: Lots of heat and not much light by the moanerati as usual. The pollution levels have been at a similarly unacceptably high level over most of the City for years, probably decades for anyone who cares to do 2 minutes of research. I am pleased that we finally have a city centre low emissions zone and that, at last, some real action is to be taken to address the City's unacceptably high pollution levels. It should have happened years ago, the centre of London became a LEZ in 2008 (where were the moanerati in Brighton then eh? Er...in power!). Having got a LEZ, I understand that the council is able to support and attract grants for emission reduction. Already we see B&H buses has got a government grant for the retroffiting of some of the fleet to reduce emissions, but there is also a better chance to influence the choice of buses for the proposals of major bus service improvements in the City Plan. If you want to make a radical difference to pollution in the city, you must reduce the number of internal combustion engines significantly. An LEZ will make the argument for funding of a contactless electric bus system (the successor to the trolly bus) that bit easier. This would encourage yet more people out of their cars as well as removing diesel buses from the roads. Lets get behind the council and keep them moving the transport agenda on.[/p][/quote]And as usual you will be sending in an invoice for your green consultancy. Jason won't always be there to subsidize your trough although he can provide you with a P45. Roll on 5/5/15. Dealing with idiots
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