The Argus40 years in prison 'too lenient' for triple killer Ian McLoughlin (From The Argus)

Get involved: Send your news, views, pictures and video by texting SUPIC to 80360 or email us.

40 years in prison 'too lenient' for triple killer Ian McLoughlin

The Argus: Killer: Ian McLoughlin Killer: Ian McLoughlin

A triple killer was given an “unduly lenient” sentence because European rules deem life sentences as “inhumane”, a court heard.

Ian McLoughlin was given a 40-year sentence after stabbing a man to death while on day release from prison.

But Attorney-General Dominic Grieve believes McLoughlin should have been imprisoned for life and has referred his case to appeal judges.

The 55-year-old was imprisoned in October for stabbing a man while on his first day release after serving 21 years for the brutal murder of a Brighton barman in 1992.

Justice Sweeney imposed a 40-year tariff at the Old Bailey and added he could not pass a whole-life term because of a European ruling.

Last year the European Court of Human Rights deemed whole-life terms “inhuman and degrading treatment” and criminals should be entitled to a review of their sentence 25 years into their term at the latest.

McLoughlin stabbed 66-year-old Graham Buck as he came to the aid of a neighbour in Little Gaddesden in Hertfordshire last July.

He was on day release from his minimum term 25-year sentence for the brutal murder of 56-year-old barman Peter Halls in Brighton in September 1990.

Mr Halls, who ran The Volks Tavern in Madeira Drive, The Eastern in East- ern Road, and the American Bar of the Norfolk Resort Hotel in King’s Road, was found dead in his flat in Sillwood Road, Brighton, after being stabbed three times in the neck.

McLoughlin, who had been offered work at one of Mr Halls’ pubs, said he assumed the bar owner was gay and thought that he might be expected to sleep with him.

He was also jailed for eight years for the manslaughter of a man in North London after beating him to death with a hammer and stashing his body in a cupboard in 1984.

Judges at the Court of Appeal heard McLoughlin did not want any argument to be made on his behalf to avoid upsetting Mr Buck’s family.

It was argued on behalf of the Attorney-General that the “failure to impose a whole-life order renders the sentence unduly lenient”.

Speaking after the hearing, Mr Grieve said: “This hearing was about preserving the principle that whole-life orders can be imposed for particularly heinous and serious crimes.

“I asked the Court of Appeal to look again at the sentence handed down to Ian McLoughlin as I believed the sentencing judge mistakenly took into account a decision of the European Court of Human Rights which is inconsistent with the domestic legislation and case law by which he was bound.

“I believed the seriousness of this case required a whole-life order because McLoughlin had a previous conviction for manslaughter in 1984, a conviction for murder in 1992, and because the murder for which he was being sentenced was committed in the course of robbery.”

Appeal judges yesterday reserved their decision to consider the matters and promised to return a verdict as soon as possible.

Comments (7)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

12:08pm Sat 25 Jan 14

Caute3 says...

Fallacies - don't you just love them? Let's do the maths: a guy, aged 55, is given a 40 year sentence which means he will be released from prison at the age of 95 - this being 17 years after the life expectancy of the average male in the UK. The judge is criticising the European courts for not being able to impose a life-means-life tariff. These people can decide our fate? Good grief.
Fallacies - don't you just love them? Let's do the maths: a guy, aged 55, is given a 40 year sentence which means he will be released from prison at the age of 95 - this being 17 years after the life expectancy of the average male in the UK. The judge is criticising the European courts for not being able to impose a life-means-life tariff. These people can decide our fate? Good grief. Caute3
  • Score: 12

12:34pm Sat 25 Jan 14

getThisCoalitionOut says...

Far more people commit far worse crimes and get nothing in comparison to this mans sentence - yet the attorney general has taken it upon himself to get this mans sentence looked at?

The whole justice system in the UK is beyond belief and needs starting from scratch and never mind Europe, just get us out of it and get rid of VAT whilst we are at It so we all have more money in our pockets to spend and get this country out of its recession!
Far more people commit far worse crimes and get nothing in comparison to this mans sentence - yet the attorney general has taken it upon himself to get this mans sentence looked at? The whole justice system in the UK is beyond belief and needs starting from scratch and never mind Europe, just get us out of it and get rid of VAT whilst we are at It so we all have more money in our pockets to spend and get this country out of its recession! getThisCoalitionOut
  • Score: -5

6:06pm Sat 25 Jan 14

Roundbill says...

Hurray - someone managed to get a sensible comment in, before the first hard-of-thinking regular bimbled into the debate. Good call, Caute3.
And now, normal service will resume. Grumble grumble grumble Europe, et cetera.
Hurray - someone managed to get a sensible comment in, before the first hard-of-thinking regular bimbled into the debate. Good call, Caute3. And now, normal service will resume. Grumble grumble grumble Europe, et cetera. Roundbill
  • Score: 5

8:44am Sun 26 Jan 14

Sussex jim says...

I would call stabbing two men and beating another to death inhumane.
This career murderer should have been given three life sentences- 120 years.
I would call stabbing two men and beating another to death inhumane. This career murderer should have been given three life sentences- 120 years. Sussex jim
  • Score: 6

10:18am Sun 26 Jan 14

mimseycal says...

Caute3 wrote:
Fallacies - don't you just love them? Let's do the maths: a guy, aged 55, is given a 40 year sentence which means he will be released from prison at the age of 95 - this being 17 years after the life expectancy of the average male in the UK. The judge is criticising the European courts for not being able to impose a life-means-life tariff. These people can decide our fate? Good grief.
Hear hear Caute3. Beware of justices playing politics.

If anything needs to be questioned it is the decision that this man was a suitable candidate for day release from prison. He'd already murdered twice before. Once by stabbing and another by beating a man to death with a hammer.
[quote][p][bold]Caute3[/bold] wrote: Fallacies - don't you just love them? Let's do the maths: a guy, aged 55, is given a 40 year sentence which means he will be released from prison at the age of 95 - this being 17 years after the life expectancy of the average male in the UK. The judge is criticising the European courts for not being able to impose a life-means-life tariff. These people can decide our fate? Good grief.[/p][/quote]Hear hear Caute3. Beware of justices playing politics. If anything needs to be questioned it is the decision that this man was a suitable candidate for day release from prison. He'd already murdered twice before. Once by stabbing and another by beating a man to death with a hammer. mimseycal
  • Score: 4

11:25am Sun 26 Jan 14

hammerfan says...

A man like this is dangerous to keep alive! This is an advert for capital punishment!
A man like this is dangerous to keep alive! This is an advert for capital punishment! hammerfan
  • Score: -1

3:08pm Sun 26 Jan 14

MuammarQaddafi says...

And it's not 'inhumane' to let a compunctionless murderer go free? Really.
And it's not 'inhumane' to let a compunctionless murderer go free? Really. MuammarQaddafi
  • Score: -1

Comments are closed on this article.

click2find

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree