Millions wasted on unwanted medicines in Sussex

The Argus: Millions wasted on unwanted medicines in Sussex Millions wasted on unwanted medicines in Sussex

Millions of pounds each year are wasted on unwanted medicines in Sussex.
 

The NHS in Brighton and Hove and the High Weald Lewes and Havens area calculate at least £3m is spent on prescriptions for drugs that are never used.
 

This is the equivalent of funding an extra 60 community nurses or carrying out 280 more heart by-pass operations.
 

In one incident, a pharmacy in Newhaven received unwanted medication from one patient which was worth £7,262.
 

Clinical commissioning groups, GPs and pharmacists say one of the biggest issues is medicines on repeat prescriptions.

These are ordered and collected by patients but end up not being used because the person no longer needs them or already has enough at home.
 

Even if they are never opened, once medicines have left the pharmacy or dispensary they cannot be recycled or used by anyone else.
 

The drugs also have to be destroyed in an incinerator which has a further financial and environmental impact.
 

The NHS is now calling on people to do what they can to help reduce the waste of medicine and save money.
 

Katy Jackson, head of prescribing and medicines commissioning for Brighton and Hove CCG, said: “This is money that could be much better spent elsewhere on providing a better and more effective health service for local residents.
 

“If anyone has unused medicines at home, please take them back to a pharmacy for safe disposal and have a chat with your pharmacist or GP about your medication and how to use them more effectively in the future.”
 

 

Comments (4)

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9:23am Mon 27 Jan 14

Morpheus says...

This is what happens when no money changes hands. I doubt that is the people who have to pay for prescriptions that are ordering what they do not need. What are the GPs doing? They should know when a repeat prescription is needed.
This is what happens when no money changes hands. I doubt that is the people who have to pay for prescriptions that are ordering what they do not need. What are the GPs doing? They should know when a repeat prescription is needed. Morpheus

9:28am Mon 27 Jan 14

FC says...

Morpheus wrote:
This is what happens when no money changes hands. I doubt that is the people who have to pay for prescriptions that are ordering what they do not need. What are the GPs doing? They should know when a repeat prescription is needed.
Ah yes! The usual scapegoat, "The GP".

I'm sorry, but if you can see YOU have 20 boxes of whatever you need in the cupboard already, it's YOUR responsibility to not order it AGAIN.

Typical pass-the-buck Britain. You want people to take control of your lives but as soon as they do, you start crying about your freedom. Make your mind up, please.
[quote][p][bold]Morpheus[/bold] wrote: This is what happens when no money changes hands. I doubt that is the people who have to pay for prescriptions that are ordering what they do not need. What are the GPs doing? They should know when a repeat prescription is needed.[/p][/quote]Ah yes! The usual scapegoat, "The GP". I'm sorry, but if you can see YOU have 20 boxes of whatever you need in the cupboard already, it's YOUR responsibility to not order it AGAIN. Typical pass-the-buck Britain. You want people to take control of your lives but as soon as they do, you start crying about your freedom. Make your mind up, please. FC

12:15pm Mon 27 Jan 14

clubrob6 says...

Surely rather than destroying drugs they could be sent to developing countries.Medication
s returned to the pharmacy should not automatically be thrown away.
Surely rather than destroying drugs they could be sent to developing countries.Medication s returned to the pharmacy should not automatically be thrown away. clubrob6

4:11pm Mon 27 Jan 14

Richada says...

I have never understood why drugs, when returned, unopened, to a pharmacy, cannot be re-used.

There are very many individuals at fault here undoubtedly, but surely a system that insists on incinerating returned drugs also needs looking at.
I have never understood why drugs, when returned, unopened, to a pharmacy, cannot be re-used. There are very many individuals at fault here undoubtedly, but surely a system that insists on incinerating returned drugs also needs looking at. Richada

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