The ArgusTen things you didn't know about Stanmer Park (From The Argus)

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Ten things you didn't know about Stanmer Park

The Argus: Stanmer House Stanmer House

Today, The Argus reports on plans to restore Brighton's wonderful Stanmer Park.

Here are ten things you may not have known about one of the city's most ancient sites.

1. The name Stanmer is derived from the Anglo-Saxon words ‘stan’ meaning ‘stone’ and ‘mere’ meaning ‘pond’.

2. There is evidence of human habitation within Stanmer Park extending back as far as the Neolithic Period, some 6,000 years ago.

3. The Pelham family, later the earls of Chichester, who bought the Stanmer estate in 1713 were descended from Oliver Cromwell.

4. During the Second World War the estate was requisitioned from the Pelham family to provide billeting and fire ranges for a Canadian tank regiment.

5. The estate was bought by the County  Borough of Brighton in 1948 to ensure rainwater could continue to be absorbed into its chalk and secure the town's water supply. 

6. Stanmer and the rest of the South Downs' undulating landscape was caused by Africa crashing into Europe, which also created the Alps.

7. It is rumoured that one of George IV's mistresses lived at Stanmer Park.

8. The badger sculpture behind Stanmer House was carved over eight months in 1991 by Reece Ingram from a tree originally planted by the Earl of Chichester 163 years before. It had survived the Great Storm of 1987, in which 45% of the wood's trees had fallen, but came down in another storm two years later. The work was sponsored by American Express. 

9. Close to the badgers are two gravestones believed to be part of a pet cemetery. One is dedicated to Snowy, who died in 1889, and one to Tip, who died in 1888.

10. A bid to enter the Guiness World Records with a mass Kate Bush dance performance last year failed - because officials said the song chosen, Wuthering Heights, was not iconic enough. 

 

Do you know any other interesting facts about Brighton's largest open space? Let us know by leaving a comment below. 

Comments (4)

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3:22pm Tue 28 Jan 14

Seventh Circle says...

There is also a lost village called Piddinghurst to the north of Stanmer, which was deserted after it's water supply dried up because of the overuse in Stanmer.
Lot's Pond, on the path between Stanmer and the Uni was built after a pony called Lot, had died of thirst nearby.
The well next to the church was hand dug and is 150ft deep.
Stanmer House and buildings nearby is haunted by a ghost called 'Lady Pru'
There have been two stones found on the estate similar in size to the ones at Stonehenge. One was sunk 16ft into the ground.
There have been found the remains of a Saxon temple, recently excavated, to the left of the road leading from the lodges down to the village and also remnants of Saxon houses to the right field below the temple.
A large ancient post hole approximately 3ft wide was found underneath a tree that had been blown over in 1987.
There is also a lost village called Piddinghurst to the north of Stanmer, which was deserted after it's water supply dried up because of the overuse in Stanmer. Lot's Pond, on the path between Stanmer and the Uni was built after a pony called Lot, had died of thirst nearby. The well next to the church was hand dug and is 150ft deep. Stanmer House and buildings nearby is haunted by a ghost called 'Lady Pru' There have been two stones found on the estate similar in size to the ones at Stonehenge. One was sunk 16ft into the ground. There have been found the remains of a Saxon temple, recently excavated, to the left of the road leading from the lodges down to the village and also remnants of Saxon houses to the right field below the temple. A large ancient post hole approximately 3ft wide was found underneath a tree that had been blown over in 1987. Seventh Circle
  • Score: 3

7:37pm Tue 28 Jan 14

Here we go again says...

In Half Moon Wood a WW11 listening post was created & manned by local volunteers. (The Secret Sussex Resistance by Stuart Angle) mentions it.
The remains of a cow was found near Rocky Clump, and is somewhere in the archive of The Booth Museum, Dyke Road, Brighton. Brighon's largest Blue Bell wood is in Stanmer Park etc etc etc Stanmer's treasures are never ending
it is truly the jewell in Brighton's crown.
In Half Moon Wood a WW11 listening post was created & manned by local volunteers. (The Secret Sussex Resistance by Stuart Angle) mentions it. The remains of a cow was found near Rocky Clump, and is somewhere in the archive of The Booth Museum, Dyke Road, Brighton. Brighon's largest Blue Bell wood is in Stanmer Park etc etc etc Stanmer's treasures are never ending it is truly the jewell in Brighton's crown. Here we go again
  • Score: 3

1:25pm Wed 29 Jan 14

Klanker says...

Seventh Circle wrote:
There is also a lost village called Piddinghurst to the north of Stanmer, which was deserted after it's water supply dried up because of the overuse in Stanmer.
Lot's Pond, on the path between Stanmer and the Uni was built after a pony called Lot, had died of thirst nearby.
The well next to the church was hand dug and is 150ft deep.
Stanmer House and buildings nearby is haunted by a ghost called 'Lady Pru'
There have been two stones found on the estate similar in size to the ones at Stonehenge. One was sunk 16ft into the ground.
There have been found the remains of a Saxon temple, recently excavated, to the left of the road leading from the lodges down to the village and also remnants of Saxon houses to the right field below the temple.
A large ancient post hole approximately 3ft wide was found underneath a tree that had been blown over in 1987.
I've googled "Piddinghurst" and the only result is this Argus article - is this a made up fact?! Surely it would be mentioned online somewhere?
[quote][p][bold]Seventh Circle[/bold] wrote: There is also a lost village called Piddinghurst to the north of Stanmer, which was deserted after it's water supply dried up because of the overuse in Stanmer. Lot's Pond, on the path between Stanmer and the Uni was built after a pony called Lot, had died of thirst nearby. The well next to the church was hand dug and is 150ft deep. Stanmer House and buildings nearby is haunted by a ghost called 'Lady Pru' There have been two stones found on the estate similar in size to the ones at Stonehenge. One was sunk 16ft into the ground. There have been found the remains of a Saxon temple, recently excavated, to the left of the road leading from the lodges down to the village and also remnants of Saxon houses to the right field below the temple. A large ancient post hole approximately 3ft wide was found underneath a tree that had been blown over in 1987.[/p][/quote]I've googled "Piddinghurst" and the only result is this Argus article - is this a made up fact?! Surely it would be mentioned online somewhere? Klanker
  • Score: 0

4:55pm Wed 29 Jan 14

Seventh Circle says...

Klanker wrote:
Seventh Circle wrote:
There is also a lost village called Piddinghurst to the north of Stanmer, which was deserted after it's water supply dried up because of the overuse in Stanmer.
Lot's Pond, on the path between Stanmer and the Uni was built after a pony called Lot, had died of thirst nearby.
The well next to the church was hand dug and is 150ft deep.
Stanmer House and buildings nearby is haunted by a ghost called 'Lady Pru'
There have been two stones found on the estate similar in size to the ones at Stonehenge. One was sunk 16ft into the ground.
There have been found the remains of a Saxon temple, recently excavated, to the left of the road leading from the lodges down to the village and also remnants of Saxon houses to the right field below the temple.
A large ancient post hole approximately 3ft wide was found underneath a tree that had been blown over in 1987.
I've googled "Piddinghurst" and the only result is this Argus article - is this a made up fact?! Surely it would be mentioned online somewhere?
I got this incorrect, it's Piddingworth and was a farm estate of around 375 acres that was ruined by the Canadians during ww2, using it for target practice
[quote][p][bold]Klanker[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Seventh Circle[/bold] wrote: There is also a lost village called Piddinghurst to the north of Stanmer, which was deserted after it's water supply dried up because of the overuse in Stanmer. Lot's Pond, on the path between Stanmer and the Uni was built after a pony called Lot, had died of thirst nearby. The well next to the church was hand dug and is 150ft deep. Stanmer House and buildings nearby is haunted by a ghost called 'Lady Pru' There have been two stones found on the estate similar in size to the ones at Stonehenge. One was sunk 16ft into the ground. There have been found the remains of a Saxon temple, recently excavated, to the left of the road leading from the lodges down to the village and also remnants of Saxon houses to the right field below the temple. A large ancient post hole approximately 3ft wide was found underneath a tree that had been blown over in 1987.[/p][/quote]I've googled "Piddinghurst" and the only result is this Argus article - is this a made up fact?! Surely it would be mentioned online somewhere?[/p][/quote]I got this incorrect, it's Piddingworth and was a farm estate of around 375 acres that was ruined by the Canadians during ww2, using it for target practice Seventh Circle
  • Score: 0

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