The ArgusPoppies to be planted throughout Brighton and Hove to create living WWI tribute (From The Argus)

Get involved: Send your news, views, pictures and video by texting SUPIC to 80360 or email us.

Poppies to be planted throughout Brighton and Hove to create living WWI tribute

The Argus: Poppies to be planted throughout Brighton and Hove to create living WWI tribute Poppies to be planted throughout Brighton and Hove to create living WWI tribute

Brighton and Hove roadsides, gardens and bowling greens will be transformed into a sea of red poppies to mark the centenary of the beginning of the First World War.

Thousands of poppy seeds will be planted across Brighton and Hove at the end of March for the poppies to bloom in June for the 100th anniversary of the beginning of the four-year conflict.

Councillors say the plans will be “stunning and poignant” as the living tribute takes hold.

Poppy seeds will be planted in Edward Road, Eastern Road, the former bowling greens in Preston Park and outside Rottingdean bowling green under plans set out by Brighton and Hove City Council.

Grass verges in many housing estates across the city will also be transformed into wildflower gardens while poppies will sprout up around the Old Steine War Memorial, which will become one of the key sites during four years of commemorations.

City council gardeners will plant other red flowers which will then come into bloom as the poppies die out.

Councillor Geoffrey Bowden, chair of Brighton and Hove City Council’s economic development and culture committee, said: “The sight of thousands of poppies emerging on wildflower sites across the city will be both stunning and poignant – a fitting way to mark the historic anniversary of the start of the First World War.

“The displays will also highlight the range of other events and commemorations being planned across the city.”

Former RAF pilot Bert Williams MBE said he has spent the past two years “planning without money” for ways to mark the First World War.

He has arranged for 40 people to travel to Belgium in August and will be laying a wreath at the India Gate at the Royal Pavilion on October 26.

He said: “I think the poppies are a brilliant idea. I am so pleased that people are taking it up; it’s so important that what happened is not forgotten.

“To ask questions about what happened is what it’s all about.”

Other remembrance plans include the restoration of the war memorial at Brighton Station and a memorial at Sussex Cricket Club to remember their players who died in action.

There are also plans for a passing through the flames ceremony at the Chattri Memorial to remember Indian soldiers who died at the Royal Pavilion.

The arts will also mark the centenary with productions by the New Venture Theatre of Sir Terence Rattigan’s The Winslow Boy, and Not About Heroes based on the meeting between First World War poets Siegfried Sasson and Wilfred Owen.

Comments (4)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

9:37am Thu 30 Jan 14

Saltdean Resident says...

Nice touch, but i'm sure poppies have been grown in most of those areas for a while now anyway, at least on Eastern Road and Rottingdean. Lets get everyone to sow poppy seeds, could look amazing and a fitting memorial.
Nice touch, but i'm sure poppies have been grown in most of those areas for a while now anyway, at least on Eastern Road and Rottingdean. Lets get everyone to sow poppy seeds, could look amazing and a fitting memorial. Saltdean Resident
  • Score: 4

9:39am Thu 30 Jan 14

The Prophet of Doom says...

Bowling greens are on the decline in the town...
Bowling greens are on the decline in the town... The Prophet of Doom
  • Score: -2

10:51am Thu 30 Jan 14

Valerie Paynter says...

BHASVIC school in Hove was opened in 1913 and its Hall is extraordinary.

There is a huge, deep ceiling level wall mural that wraps round the room's perimeter, painted in the fashionable illustration style of the day. There are two massive memorial boards on one wall with the names of BHASVIC old boys who were killed in the Great War - a long list of them. It has stained glass windows -again bery much in the 1913 style. Just to stand in this assembly Hall is to time travel.

That Hall is hugely atmospheric and evocative of an England that is gone, that England of 1913 and the traumatic war that began just a year after BHASVIC opened. The sense of that era is very powerful in that room. Almost like a film set - and it should indeed be used for authentic period drama filming purposes. A lot of money could be made from offering it to location hunters.

It would be fitting for it to be used to host commemorative events and perhaps even a full exhibition during the summer holiday when not needed for schooling. The centenary has seen a wall-mounted case-ful of mementies of the school's past drily offered but that room is a museum artefact in its own right and so special it should be to the fore in the centenary commemoration activities of WW1 - The Great War, as it was known back then.

Not until another war came along that hoovered in most of the globe's nations did the terms WW1 and WW2 so sadly need to be coined which led to its original name being dropped. I suspect they used the word great more to describe the vast involvement of so much of the world. There was nothing great about it in the bigged up sense of the word.

Jeremy Paxman presents a BBC1 history that began this week. Saw the first episode on iplayer. It is very good indeed.
BHASVIC school in Hove was opened in 1913 and its Hall is extraordinary. There is a huge, deep ceiling level wall mural that wraps round the room's perimeter, painted in the fashionable illustration style of the day. There are two massive memorial boards on one wall with the names of BHASVIC old boys who were killed in the Great War - a long list of them. It has stained glass windows -again bery much in the 1913 style. Just to stand in this assembly Hall is to time travel. That Hall is hugely atmospheric and evocative of an England that is gone, that England of 1913 and the traumatic war that began just a year after BHASVIC opened. The sense of that era is very powerful in that room. Almost like a film set - and it should indeed be used for authentic period drama filming purposes. A lot of money could be made from offering it to location hunters. It would be fitting for it to be used to host commemorative events and perhaps even a full exhibition during the summer holiday when not needed for schooling. The centenary has seen a wall-mounted case-ful of mementies of the school's past drily offered but that room is a museum artefact in its own right and so special it should be to the fore in the centenary commemoration activities of WW1 - The Great War, as it was known back then. Not until another war came along that hoovered in most of the globe's nations did the terms WW1 and WW2 so sadly need to be coined which led to its original name being dropped. I suspect they used the word great more to describe the vast involvement of so much of the world. There was nothing great about it in the bigged up sense of the word. Jeremy Paxman presents a BBC1 history that began this week. Saw the first episode on iplayer. It is very good indeed. Valerie Paynter
  • Score: 3

11:24am Thu 30 Jan 14

All 9 of me says...

Edward Road, another phantom thoroughfare......
Edward Road, another phantom thoroughfare...... All 9 of me
  • Score: -2

Comments are closed on this article.

click2find

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree