Sussex charity invites Government minister to county's ancient woods

Sussex charity invites Government minister to county's ancient woods

Sussex charity invites Government minister to county's ancient woods

First published in News

Sussex Wildlife Trust has invited a Government minister to the county to learn about ancient woodlands.

The charity has extended the hand of hospitality to environment minister Owen Paterson for a lesson on biodiversity.

It follows a high- profile interview in which the Conservative MP said losing woodlands could be offset by planting new trees elsewhere.

Charity chief executive Tony Whitbread has also sent Mr Paterson a copy of Dr Patrick Roper’s book Brede High Woods.

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8:40pm Sun 2 Feb 14

fredflintstone1 says...

Is this not the ultimate in hypocrisy by the Sussex Wildlife Trust? Literally hundreds of mature oaks over 50 years old, along with other trees including elms, ash and yew, were hacked down illegally at Wild Park, without a felling licence being sought from the Forestry Commission, let alone consultation with the local community.

You didn't hear so much as a grunt of complaint out of the Trust then, in spite of this being the biggest act of environmental vandalism in the area for decades. Quite the reverse - they supported it!

Now the son of their grazing officer is being paid £2 per sheep per week by the Council to run his flock where those self-same trees used to stand, with the land in this public park being fenced off for the sheep.

It's a scandal, and the Minister might like to investigate firstly whether there is a serious conflict of interest here involving the SWT and its charitable status, and secondly, if public funding should be used in this way.
Is this not the ultimate in hypocrisy by the Sussex Wildlife Trust? Literally hundreds of mature oaks over 50 years old, along with other trees including elms, ash and yew, were hacked down illegally at Wild Park, without a felling licence being sought from the Forestry Commission, let alone consultation with the local community. You didn't hear so much as a grunt of complaint out of the Trust then, in spite of this being the biggest act of environmental vandalism in the area for decades. Quite the reverse - they supported it! Now the son of their grazing officer is being paid £2 per sheep per week by the Council to run his flock where those self-same trees used to stand, with the land in this public park being fenced off for the sheep. It's a scandal, and the Minister might like to investigate firstly whether there is a serious conflict of interest here involving the SWT and its charitable status, and secondly, if public funding should be used in this way. fredflintstone1
  • Score: 2

10:16am Mon 3 Feb 14

redwing says...

"You didn't hear so much as a grunt of complaint out of the Trust then..."
That's because they understand the importance of different habitats, one of which is chalk grassland.
"You didn't hear so much as a grunt of complaint out of the Trust then..." That's because they understand the importance of different habitats, one of which is chalk grassland. redwing
  • Score: -1

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