Fugitive Brighton hawk lured home

Sue Davies with her Harris hawk

Sue Davies with her Harris hawk

First published in News

A pet hawk has returned to his home in Brighton three days after taking flight.

Bird, a three-year-old Harris hawk, escaped when owner Sue Davis, of Stephens Road, Hollingdean, took him into her garden.

He was sighted by neighbours several times over the next three days, but he was finally re-captured after following his owner's van back home.

“I had to fish for him,” said Miss Davis, who had to put a chick on a long line and lure the bird in.

The operation last month took two hours and she was assisted by her daughters Tamara, 22, and Miya, 15.

Ms Craig said: “The storms wrecked their housing so we now have to keep them inside, so when I take them out they get a little excited.

“We are so glad to have had him back before more storms came in.”

Miss Davis has kept birds of prey since she was a child. Bird is part of the hawk displays run by Ms Craig at local schools and charity events.

Comments (7)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

7:10am Thu 6 Feb 14

Hector66 says...

Miss Davies, Ms Craig, Mistake.
Miss Davies, Ms Craig, Mistake. Hector66
  • Score: 1

9:35am Thu 6 Feb 14

nosolution says...

Is the ring through her nose so she can be traced back to the bird if she gets lost too?
Is the ring through her nose so she can be traced back to the bird if she gets lost too? nosolution
  • Score: 4

10:20am Thu 6 Feb 14

plantwoman says...

Eeek! No wonder he flew away!
Eeek! No wonder he flew away! plantwoman
  • Score: 4

12:14pm Thu 6 Feb 14

Tailgaters Anonymous says...

PW - agreed, clearly identity crisis caused this!
But where's the tilting fire tender?
PW - agreed, clearly identity crisis caused this! But where's the tilting fire tender? Tailgaters Anonymous
  • Score: 1

1:03pm Thu 6 Feb 14

getThisCoalitionOut says...

These birds should be in the wild not kept in a house. No wonder it gets excited when it goes out in the garden, it should be outside all the time.

Please everyone - don't have birds of prey to your schools, it's teaching it's ok to keep wild life in captivity - which it is not.
These birds should be in the wild not kept in a house. No wonder it gets excited when it goes out in the garden, it should be outside all the time. Please everyone - don't have birds of prey to your schools, it's teaching it's ok to keep wild life in captivity - which it is not. getThisCoalitionOut
  • Score: -8

6:45pm Thu 6 Feb 14

Saker-Clive says...

getThisCoalitionOut wrote:
These birds should be in the wild not kept in a house. No wonder it gets excited when it goes out in the garden, it should be outside all the time.

Please everyone - don't have birds of prey to your schools, it's teaching it's ok to keep wild life in captivity - which it is not.
The Harris Hawk IS NOT NATIVE to the UK but originates from the USA and south to Peru depending on sub-species. If these birds were 'liberated' as you seem to want, they could legally be shot and destroyed. Any non native bird or hybrid has any animal rights to the British fauna unless being flown for falconry or display work. All bird should have a transmitter fitted when being flown free; this shows the authorities that we as falconers/austringer
s are doing everything we can should the bird go awol.
Do you have any pets? dog, cat.............budg
ie. What is the difference whether it be a bird of prey or a cat or dog. Dogs are by nature pack animals, so keeping 1 on its own is more harmful than people with birds. I could go to a vet should any of my birds need treatment and tell them what the weight of the bird is, its condition and probably what's wrong with it. Genealpet owners couldn't!!
[quote][p][bold]getThisCoalitionOut[/bold] wrote: These birds should be in the wild not kept in a house. No wonder it gets excited when it goes out in the garden, it should be outside all the time. Please everyone - don't have birds of prey to your schools, it's teaching it's ok to keep wild life in captivity - which it is not.[/p][/quote]The Harris Hawk IS NOT NATIVE to the UK but originates from the USA and south to Peru depending on sub-species. If these birds were 'liberated' as you seem to want, they could legally be shot and destroyed. Any non native bird or hybrid has any animal rights to the British fauna unless being flown for falconry or display work. All bird should have a transmitter fitted when being flown free; this shows the authorities that we as falconers/austringer s are doing everything we can should the bird go awol. Do you have any pets? dog, cat.............budg ie. What is the difference whether it be a bird of prey or a cat or dog. Dogs are by nature pack animals, so keeping 1 on its own is more harmful than people with birds. I could go to a vet should any of my birds need treatment and tell them what the weight of the bird is, its condition and probably what's wrong with it. Genealpet owners couldn't!! Saker-Clive
  • Score: 8

7:18pm Thu 6 Feb 14

jimpy762 says...

getThisCoalitionOut wrote:
These birds should be in the wild not kept in a house. No wonder it gets excited when it goes out in the garden, it should be outside all the time.

Please everyone - don't have birds of prey to your schools, it's teaching it's ok to keep wild life in captivity - which it is not.
These are working animals and have been for centuries, much like the horse. They're extremely effective at stopping pigeons and seagulls ruining expensive buildings and rooftops and achieve that just by being regularly seen. The industrial estate where I work has 2 waste transfer stations which attracts seagulls on a grand scale. There's a very interesting guy who turns up every so often and flies his Harris around to scare them off. They've got one at the Amex too, stops people having to sit in pigeon poo.
[quote][p][bold]getThisCoalitionOut[/bold] wrote: These birds should be in the wild not kept in a house. No wonder it gets excited when it goes out in the garden, it should be outside all the time. Please everyone - don't have birds of prey to your schools, it's teaching it's ok to keep wild life in captivity - which it is not.[/p][/quote]These are working animals and have been for centuries, much like the horse. They're extremely effective at stopping pigeons and seagulls ruining expensive buildings and rooftops and achieve that just by being regularly seen. The industrial estate where I work has 2 waste transfer stations which attracts seagulls on a grand scale. There's a very interesting guy who turns up every so often and flies his Harris around to scare them off. They've got one at the Amex too, stops people having to sit in pigeon poo. jimpy762
  • Score: 5

Comments are closed on this article.

Send us your news, pictures and videos

Most read stories

Local Info

Enter your postcode, town or place name

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree