The ArgusEating disorder admissions to Sussex hospitals on the rise (From The Argus)

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Eating disorder admissions to Sussex hospitals on the rise

The Argus: Eating disorder admissions to Sussex hospitals on the rise Eating disorder admissions to Sussex hospitals on the rise

Patients with eating disorders are being urgently admitted to hospital more than once each week in Sussex.

Figures show that hospitals dealt with emergency cases of food problems, including anorexia and bulimia, 95 times over a one-year period – a rise of almost a third.

Most cases were younger women and teenagers, with some coming in more than once over the year.

Some patients ended up staying in hospital for several weeks, while others were treated and discharged the same day.

The increase is believed to be for various reasons, including greater awareness of the condition and the influence of peer pressure and images in the media.

Specialist treatment and support for people with eating disorders is provided by the Sussex Partnership NHS Foundation Trust.

A spokesman said: “It’s important to remember that these figures relate to the number of admissions and not patients.

“One patient can be admitted multiple times, sometimes for routine tests or treatment.

“The increase in the admissions to acute hospitals of patients suffering from eating disorders is part of a national trend.

“Sussex Partnership set up a dedicated Sussex-wide severe eating disorder consultation and assessment service four years ago.

"This service provides care and support to adults suffering from severe eating disorders, working with patients, their families, local care teams and GPs to prevent their health deteriorating further, which could lead to a hospital admission.

“It has been specifically developed for the needs of the local population and is well regarded in the field as an example of good practice.”

Rebecca Field, from the eating disorder charity Beat, said that the figures were just the tip of the iceberg.

She said: “The figures only show inpatient admissions – we know that the majority of individuals are treated as outpatients within their community as well as in private treatment centres, or worse still, not treated at all.

“Inpatient treatment should be the last resort. Ideally help would be provided much quicker. We know that recovery is possible and the sooner an individual receives the treatment they need the more likely they are to make a full recovery and the less chance that lengthy stays in a specialist inpatient unit are necessary.”

The figures were published by the Health and Social Care Information Centre and cover the period from November 2012 to the end of October 2013.

Comments (2)

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5:47pm Mon 10 Feb 14

LeonBIank666 says...

Great. So whilst elderly folk are waiting years for hip replacements etc, stupid teenage girls who want to look like supermodels are having a fortune thrown at them.

Girls, most men are like me and prefer girls with some meat on their bones!!
Great. So whilst elderly folk are waiting years for hip replacements etc, stupid teenage girls who want to look like supermodels are having a fortune thrown at them. Girls, most men are like me and prefer girls with some meat on their bones!! LeonBIank666
  • Score: 1

1:05pm Tue 11 Feb 14

eld263 says...

That is a really ill-informed and overwhelmingly unhelpful comment. One group of individuals in need of care should not be compared with another group who are also in need of care. Both are equally deserving of health and well-being services. Eating disorders are complex mental health problems, and not merely individuals being self-involved as you seem to suggest. They arise from a number of cultural and psychological phenomena - please research your comments in the future, before throwing them out mindlessly and causing pain to anyone reading this that may need support from the services mentioned.
That is a really ill-informed and overwhelmingly unhelpful comment. One group of individuals in need of care should not be compared with another group who are also in need of care. Both are equally deserving of health and well-being services. Eating disorders are complex mental health problems, and not merely individuals being self-involved as you seem to suggest. They arise from a number of cultural and psychological phenomena - please research your comments in the future, before throwing them out mindlessly and causing pain to anyone reading this that may need support from the services mentioned. eld263
  • Score: 1

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