The ArgusPatcham's resident weathervane worried about more rain (From The Argus)

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Patcham's resident weathervane worried about more rain

The Argus: David Harris David Harris

Residents are being kept up to date with the latest flood threat by a friendly neighbour.

David Harris has been posting regular updates outside Patcham Post Office in Old London Road to give residents the latest information.

Areas of Patcham can suffer from groundwater rising into basements.

And the 77-year-old lifelong Patcham resident has measured that the groundwater is currently rising at nine inches a day and if this rate continued the local area would flood at 8.01am on February 18.

Mr Harris is quick to clarify this is purely hypothetical and unlikely to happen in reality.

He also pointed out that groundwater rose much higher a year ago.

On January 6, 2013 the water levels were 1.84 meters below the surface compared to 2.27m below at the moment.

He added: “I am perturbed by the amount of rainfall we are predicted, Monday and Tuesday we are going to have rainfall coming through.

“Things are much better than they were in 2000 and if the elements do what they do then you can't really do anything about it, we have mitigated the damage as best we could.

“The Environment Agency, Southern Water and the council's civil contingencies manager deserve a lot of praise.”

Comments (6)

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9:44am Thu 13 Feb 14

Richada says...

Such a pity there isn't someone of David Harris' calibre running the hapless Environment agency. Rather than now firefighting this immense flooding problem on a national scale, the Agency might have been better prepared for it in the first place!
Such a pity there isn't someone of David Harris' calibre running the hapless Environment agency. Rather than now firefighting this immense flooding problem on a national scale, the Agency might have been better prepared for it in the first place! Richada
  • Score: 0

11:10am Thu 13 Feb 14

Brighton1000 says...

Richada wrote:
Such a pity there isn't someone of David Harris' calibre running the hapless Environment agency. Rather than now firefighting this immense flooding problem on a national scale, the Agency might have been better prepared for it in the first place!
Do you actually believe the environment agency can prevent a deluge of rainfall (2 months worth in a week), and the inevitable floods this will create?

What would this country do in a real disaster? We spend so long pointing the finger at who to blame, we forget what some humans go through during natural disaters.

If you are so concerned perhaps rather than tapping away on a keyboard, get out there and help?
[quote][p][bold]Richada[/bold] wrote: Such a pity there isn't someone of David Harris' calibre running the hapless Environment agency. Rather than now firefighting this immense flooding problem on a national scale, the Agency might have been better prepared for it in the first place![/p][/quote]Do you actually believe the environment agency can prevent a deluge of rainfall (2 months worth in a week), and the inevitable floods this will create? What would this country do in a real disaster? We spend so long pointing the finger at who to blame, we forget what some humans go through during natural disaters. If you are so concerned perhaps rather than tapping away on a keyboard, get out there and help? Brighton1000
  • Score: 2

11:21am Thu 13 Feb 14

Richada says...

Brighton1000 wrote:
Richada wrote:
Such a pity there isn't someone of David Harris' calibre running the hapless Environment agency. Rather than now firefighting this immense flooding problem on a national scale, the Agency might have been better prepared for it in the first place!
Do you actually believe the environment agency can prevent a deluge of rainfall (2 months worth in a week), and the inevitable floods this will create?

What would this country do in a real disaster? We spend so long pointing the finger at who to blame, we forget what some humans go through during natural disaters.

If you are so concerned perhaps rather than tapping away on a keyboard, get out there and help?
As it happens I have been.

The Environment agency could have done quite a lot, if not to prevent, to reduce the collosal flooding on the Somerset Levels - simply by dredging the channels.

On the River Thames, similarly, the water levels were better managed by the old Rivers Authority who took a more specialist and locol control of what was going on.

There is nothing any of us as individuals, nor any authority, can do to prevent a deluge of rainfall, but, by proper management, there is an awful lot we can do both locally and nationally to reduce the impacts of it - as indeed has been done very successfully elsewhere in Europe.
[quote][p][bold]Brighton1000[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Richada[/bold] wrote: Such a pity there isn't someone of David Harris' calibre running the hapless Environment agency. Rather than now firefighting this immense flooding problem on a national scale, the Agency might have been better prepared for it in the first place![/p][/quote]Do you actually believe the environment agency can prevent a deluge of rainfall (2 months worth in a week), and the inevitable floods this will create? What would this country do in a real disaster? We spend so long pointing the finger at who to blame, we forget what some humans go through during natural disaters. If you are so concerned perhaps rather than tapping away on a keyboard, get out there and help?[/p][/quote]As it happens I have been. The Environment agency could have done quite a lot, if not to prevent, to reduce the collosal flooding on the Somerset Levels - simply by dredging the channels. On the River Thames, similarly, the water levels were better managed by the old Rivers Authority who took a more specialist and locol control of what was going on. There is nothing any of us as individuals, nor any authority, can do to prevent a deluge of rainfall, but, by proper management, there is an awful lot we can do both locally and nationally to reduce the impacts of it - as indeed has been done very successfully elsewhere in Europe. Richada
  • Score: 0

11:48am Thu 13 Feb 14

Brighton1000 says...

Richada wrote:
Brighton1000 wrote:
Richada wrote:
Such a pity there isn't someone of David Harris' calibre running the hapless Environment agency. Rather than now firefighting this immense flooding problem on a national scale, the Agency might have been better prepared for it in the first place!
Do you actually believe the environment agency can prevent a deluge of rainfall (2 months worth in a week), and the inevitable floods this will create?

What would this country do in a real disaster? We spend so long pointing the finger at who to blame, we forget what some humans go through during natural disaters.

If you are so concerned perhaps rather than tapping away on a keyboard, get out there and help?
As it happens I have been.

The Environment agency could have done quite a lot, if not to prevent, to reduce the collosal flooding on the Somerset Levels - simply by dredging the channels.

On the River Thames, similarly, the water levels were better managed by the old Rivers Authority who took a more specialist and locol control of what was going on.

There is nothing any of us as individuals, nor any authority, can do to prevent a deluge of rainfall, but, by proper management, there is an awful lot we can do both locally and nationally to reduce the impacts of it - as indeed has been done very successfully elsewhere in Europe.
Places that spend £3.5 billion on flood defences compared to our £0.5 billion. And can you imagine the finger pointing if Governement had suddenly started spending £3.5 billion on flood defences, No one saw this coming, I agree perhaps dredging may have helped, but wouldnt have prevented it altogther.Mother nature is a force no one can control nor prevent, Instead of turning it into a political blame game people should just help eah other, we are all on this planet together after all.

Where have you been out helping?
[quote][p][bold]Richada[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Brighton1000[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Richada[/bold] wrote: Such a pity there isn't someone of David Harris' calibre running the hapless Environment agency. Rather than now firefighting this immense flooding problem on a national scale, the Agency might have been better prepared for it in the first place![/p][/quote]Do you actually believe the environment agency can prevent a deluge of rainfall (2 months worth in a week), and the inevitable floods this will create? What would this country do in a real disaster? We spend so long pointing the finger at who to blame, we forget what some humans go through during natural disaters. If you are so concerned perhaps rather than tapping away on a keyboard, get out there and help?[/p][/quote]As it happens I have been. The Environment agency could have done quite a lot, if not to prevent, to reduce the collosal flooding on the Somerset Levels - simply by dredging the channels. On the River Thames, similarly, the water levels were better managed by the old Rivers Authority who took a more specialist and locol control of what was going on. There is nothing any of us as individuals, nor any authority, can do to prevent a deluge of rainfall, but, by proper management, there is an awful lot we can do both locally and nationally to reduce the impacts of it - as indeed has been done very successfully elsewhere in Europe.[/p][/quote]Places that spend £3.5 billion on flood defences compared to our £0.5 billion. And can you imagine the finger pointing if Governement had suddenly started spending £3.5 billion on flood defences, No one saw this coming, I agree perhaps dredging may have helped, but wouldnt have prevented it altogther.Mother nature is a force no one can control nor prevent, Instead of turning it into a political blame game people should just help eah other, we are all on this planet together after all. Where have you been out helping? Brighton1000
  • Score: -1

12:13pm Thu 13 Feb 14

Richada says...

Brighton1000 wrote:
Richada wrote:
Brighton1000 wrote:
Richada wrote:
Such a pity there isn't someone of David Harris' calibre running the hapless Environment agency. Rather than now firefighting this immense flooding problem on a national scale, the Agency might have been better prepared for it in the first place!
Do you actually believe the environment agency can prevent a deluge of rainfall (2 months worth in a week), and the inevitable floods this will create?

What would this country do in a real disaster? We spend so long pointing the finger at who to blame, we forget what some humans go through during natural disaters.

If you are so concerned perhaps rather than tapping away on a keyboard, get out there and help?
As it happens I have been.

The Environment agency could have done quite a lot, if not to prevent, to reduce the collosal flooding on the Somerset Levels - simply by dredging the channels.

On the River Thames, similarly, the water levels were better managed by the old Rivers Authority who took a more specialist and locol control of what was going on.

There is nothing any of us as individuals, nor any authority, can do to prevent a deluge of rainfall, but, by proper management, there is an awful lot we can do both locally and nationally to reduce the impacts of it - as indeed has been done very successfully elsewhere in Europe.
Places that spend £3.5 billion on flood defences compared to our £0.5 billion. And can you imagine the finger pointing if Governement had suddenly started spending £3.5 billion on flood defences, No one saw this coming, I agree perhaps dredging may have helped, but wouldnt have prevented it altogther.Mother nature is a force no one can control nor prevent, Instead of turning it into a political blame game people should just help eah other, we are all on this planet together after all.

Where have you been out helping?
Patcham, which as yet, although on a knife-edge, mercifully has not experienced the flooding, but is now in a much better state of readiness thanks to many looking out for the many elderly that live there.

As far as "helping" is concerned, you'll probably d*mn me if I do and d*mn me if I don't, on balance,, I'd rather be damned for doing.

As far as "suddenly" spending the £3.5Bn you quote above, I couldn't agree more. The fact is that none of this should be handled on a sudden knee-jerk reaction.

I'd be disinclined to agree that "no one saw this coming" - these kind of weather patterns have been widely predicted, although the movement of the Gulf Stream was, perhaps, more of a surprise.

I also agree with you that there needs to be a much greater culture for "caring" at a practical level here - but then, as others have pointed out in similar threads to this one, it is disaters such as this that bring out the best in us as a nation.
[quote][p][bold]Brighton1000[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Richada[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Brighton1000[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Richada[/bold] wrote: Such a pity there isn't someone of David Harris' calibre running the hapless Environment agency. Rather than now firefighting this immense flooding problem on a national scale, the Agency might have been better prepared for it in the first place![/p][/quote]Do you actually believe the environment agency can prevent a deluge of rainfall (2 months worth in a week), and the inevitable floods this will create? What would this country do in a real disaster? We spend so long pointing the finger at who to blame, we forget what some humans go through during natural disaters. If you are so concerned perhaps rather than tapping away on a keyboard, get out there and help?[/p][/quote]As it happens I have been. The Environment agency could have done quite a lot, if not to prevent, to reduce the collosal flooding on the Somerset Levels - simply by dredging the channels. On the River Thames, similarly, the water levels were better managed by the old Rivers Authority who took a more specialist and locol control of what was going on. There is nothing any of us as individuals, nor any authority, can do to prevent a deluge of rainfall, but, by proper management, there is an awful lot we can do both locally and nationally to reduce the impacts of it - as indeed has been done very successfully elsewhere in Europe.[/p][/quote]Places that spend £3.5 billion on flood defences compared to our £0.5 billion. And can you imagine the finger pointing if Governement had suddenly started spending £3.5 billion on flood defences, No one saw this coming, I agree perhaps dredging may have helped, but wouldnt have prevented it altogther.Mother nature is a force no one can control nor prevent, Instead of turning it into a political blame game people should just help eah other, we are all on this planet together after all. Where have you been out helping?[/p][/quote]Patcham, which as yet, although on a knife-edge, mercifully has not experienced the flooding, but is now in a much better state of readiness thanks to many looking out for the many elderly that live there. As far as "helping" is concerned, you'll probably d*mn me if I do and d*mn me if I don't, on balance,, I'd rather be damned for doing. As far as "suddenly" spending the £3.5Bn you quote above, I couldn't agree more. The fact is that none of this should be handled on a sudden knee-jerk reaction. I'd be disinclined to agree that "no one saw this coming" - these kind of weather patterns have been widely predicted, although the movement of the Gulf Stream was, perhaps, more of a surprise. I also agree with you that there needs to be a much greater culture for "caring" at a practical level here - but then, as others have pointed out in similar threads to this one, it is disaters such as this that bring out the best in us as a nation. Richada
  • Score: 1

1:44pm Thu 13 Feb 14

VBpatch says...

I live on Old London Road where it may flood (my house did flood apparently in 2000). David Harris has been a fantastic source of information, sending us nightly emails so that we can prepare as best we can, and I am very grateful to him for all the hard work he does compiling the data. I would also say the overall communication from both the council, the EA and other agencies involved has been really good. There is no point blaming anyone in this instance, we just have to prepare as best we can. Luckily we have had a lot of warning and time to get ready, unlike other parts of the country.
I live on Old London Road where it may flood (my house did flood apparently in 2000). David Harris has been a fantastic source of information, sending us nightly emails so that we can prepare as best we can, and I am very grateful to him for all the hard work he does compiling the data. I would also say the overall communication from both the council, the EA and other agencies involved has been really good. There is no point blaming anyone in this instance, we just have to prepare as best we can. Luckily we have had a lot of warning and time to get ready, unlike other parts of the country. VBpatch
  • Score: 2

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