Cyclist shocked after being knocked off bike

A cyclist and driver were treated for shock after a collision this morning.

The 35-year-old cyclist was shunted off his bike on Upper Lewes Road, near the junction of Rose Hill, just after 7am.

He was not injured but an ambulance was called to the scene.

Comments (12)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

8:31am Fri 14 Feb 14

Tailgaters Anonymous says...

..and the motorist, perhaps was just 'surprised'?
..and the motorist, perhaps was just 'surprised'? Tailgaters Anonymous

8:40am Fri 14 Feb 14

worthingite says...

It should read 'The cyclist was in shock' shock being a form of illness,
NOT 'Shocked'

One day, when they stop paying peanuts, they might get it right!
It should read 'The cyclist was in shock' shock being a form of illness, NOT 'Shocked' One day, when they stop paying peanuts, they might get it right! worthingite

9:03am Fri 14 Feb 14

BURIRAM says...

Not the sort of weather you would want to cycle. Wait for the Summer
Not the sort of weather you would want to cycle. Wait for the Summer BURIRAM

9:23am Fri 14 Feb 14

Barry Trotter says...

Cyclists should get used to the way we get treated by some drivers, particularly those important drivers who permit us to use their roads, as long as they're not hindered in the rush to the back of the next queue.
Cyclists should get used to the way we get treated by some drivers, particularly those important drivers who permit us to use their roads, as long as they're not hindered in the rush to the back of the next queue. Barry Trotter

11:36am Fri 14 Feb 14

banargustrolls says...

Awful headline, awfully short story
Awful headline, awfully short story banargustrolls

12:06pm Fri 14 Feb 14

Valerie Paynter says...

Barry Trotter wrote:
Cyclists should get used to the way we get treated by some drivers, particularly those important drivers who permit us to use their roads, as long as they're not hindered in the rush to the back of the next queue.
*Ahem*......

I have to say something here. As a disabled person, I sit in a lot of taxis and see from their perspective just what incredibly irresponsible and kamikaze cyclists are doing - especially in low light.

Last week: A woman on a unique bike - adult at the front and child size at the back - a tandem. They were virtually invisible until the taxi was just yards from them. No reflective anything on that small child or on her adult companion. Nothing to indicate an unusual or any kind of cyclist presence.
Why should drivers have to dodge people like this who make no effort to signal their presence in low light?

From taxi passenger seats - front and back - I see dark clothing with nothing to signal presence apart from a tiny, tiny red light at the back under the seat area and sometimes I see them cut across our path or swerve into it. And marvel that the taxi driver saw them. Cause I would have hit them, had I been driving.

The eye line is higher than these teensy little red lights. Reflective harnesses should be absolutely basic. Reflective strips round trouser ankle areas helps. Reflective helmets with back and front flashing lights would be ideal. 99% of cyclists do not have a clue how invisible they are.

Even in daylight, in a busy urban environment with competing things to be aware of (such as pedestrians jaywalking and etc.) cyclists need to make themselves extra visible and cannot be arsed to do it. And those are the ones bothering to use the roads.

Those using pavements intimidating pedestrians are even worse. I used to be a cyclist, so I am pro-cycling and believe in high use of them. But with a serious attitude towards their own responsibility for staying safe.

I say all this but I recognise that cyclists are treated badly by car drivers. I was taken out myself once, back in London, by someone from an embassy who decided to make a left turn as I was already engaged in crossing the intersection. Off I went. I made him walk my bike (with shopping from Sainsbury in the front basket) home with me. I was unfit to ride and bleeding.

I would like to see all bicycles licensed so their riders can be made accountable when THEY cause probems.
[quote][p][bold]Barry Trotter[/bold] wrote: Cyclists should get used to the way we get treated by some drivers, particularly those important drivers who permit us to use their roads, as long as they're not hindered in the rush to the back of the next queue.[/p][/quote]*Ahem*...... I have to say something here. As a disabled person, I sit in a lot of taxis and see from their perspective just what incredibly irresponsible and kamikaze cyclists are doing - especially in low light. Last week: A woman on a unique bike - adult at the front and child size at the back - a tandem. They were virtually invisible until the taxi was just yards from them. No reflective anything on that small child or on her adult companion. Nothing to indicate an unusual or any kind of cyclist presence. Why should drivers have to dodge people like this who make no effort to signal their presence in low light? From taxi passenger seats - front and back - I see dark clothing with nothing to signal presence apart from a tiny, tiny red light at the back under the seat area and sometimes I see them cut across our path or swerve into it. And marvel that the taxi driver saw them. Cause I would have hit them, had I been driving. The eye line is higher than these teensy little red lights. Reflective harnesses should be absolutely basic. Reflective strips round trouser ankle areas helps. Reflective helmets with back and front flashing lights would be ideal. 99% of cyclists do not have a clue how invisible they are. Even in daylight, in a busy urban environment with competing things to be aware of (such as pedestrians jaywalking and etc.) cyclists need to make themselves extra visible and cannot be arsed to do it. And those are the ones bothering to use the roads. Those using pavements intimidating pedestrians are even worse. I used to be a cyclist, so I am pro-cycling and believe in high use of them. But with a serious attitude towards their own responsibility for staying safe. I say all this but I recognise that cyclists are treated badly by car drivers. I was taken out myself once, back in London, by someone from an embassy who decided to make a left turn as I was already engaged in crossing the intersection. Off I went. I made him walk my bike (with shopping from Sainsbury in the front basket) home with me. I was unfit to ride and bleeding. I would like to see all bicycles licensed so their riders can be made accountable when THEY cause probems. Valerie Paynter

4:36pm Fri 14 Feb 14

wexler53 says...

Well worth the cost in time and money of an ambulance call out then?
Well worth the cost in time and money of an ambulance call out then? wexler53

5:36pm Fri 14 Feb 14

ARMANA says...

Barry Trotter wrote:
Cyclists should get used to the way we get treated by some drivers, particularly those important drivers who permit us to use their roads, as long as they're not hindered in the rush to the back of the next queue.
Yes, Im one of those drivers, nice to see a cyclist who knows his place, !!
[quote][p][bold]Barry Trotter[/bold] wrote: Cyclists should get used to the way we get treated by some drivers, particularly those important drivers who permit us to use their roads, as long as they're not hindered in the rush to the back of the next queue.[/p][/quote]Yes, Im one of those drivers, nice to see a cyclist who knows his place, !! ARMANA

11:01pm Fri 14 Feb 14

spurious warnings says...

one down!...
one down!... spurious warnings

8:07am Sat 15 Feb 14

Sussex jim says...

I had occasion to drive into town one evening after dark, to collect someone from a coach outing by the pier. I passed eleven cyclists en route: none of which had lights on.
When I was a boy, and had to cycle, if I ventured out after dark without a light I was invariably stopped by a policeman; who then ordered me to dismount and push the bike home.
How times change. And, for the price of a pint, every cyclist could now afford a yellow high-vis vest. You know it makes sense.
I had occasion to drive into town one evening after dark, to collect someone from a coach outing by the pier. I passed eleven cyclists en route: none of which had lights on. When I was a boy, and had to cycle, if I ventured out after dark without a light I was invariably stopped by a policeman; who then ordered me to dismount and push the bike home. How times change. And, for the price of a pint, every cyclist could now afford a yellow high-vis vest. You know it makes sense. Sussex jim

1:11pm Sat 15 Feb 14

Gribbet says...

Sussex jim wrote:
I had occasion to drive into town one evening after dark, to collect someone from a coach outing by the pier. I passed eleven cyclists en route: none of which had lights on.
When I was a boy, and had to cycle, if I ventured out after dark without a light I was invariably stopped by a policeman; who then ordered me to dismount and push the bike home.
How times change. And, for the price of a pint, every cyclist could now afford a yellow high-vis vest. You know it makes sense.
Nice anecdote, your childhood sounds like a Hovis ad, but what does it have to do with this incident?
[quote][p][bold]Sussex jim[/bold] wrote: I had occasion to drive into town one evening after dark, to collect someone from a coach outing by the pier. I passed eleven cyclists en route: none of which had lights on. When I was a boy, and had to cycle, if I ventured out after dark without a light I was invariably stopped by a policeman; who then ordered me to dismount and push the bike home. How times change. And, for the price of a pint, every cyclist could now afford a yellow high-vis vest. You know it makes sense.[/p][/quote]Nice anecdote, your childhood sounds like a Hovis ad, but what does it have to do with this incident? Gribbet

4:26pm Tue 18 Feb 14

Barry Trotter says...

Gribbet wrote:
Sussex jim wrote:
I had occasion to drive into town one evening after dark, to collect someone from a coach outing by the pier. I passed eleven cyclists en route: none of which had lights on.
When I was a boy, and had to cycle, if I ventured out after dark without a light I was invariably stopped by a policeman; who then ordered me to dismount and push the bike home.
How times change. And, for the price of a pint, every cyclist could now afford a yellow high-vis vest. You know it makes sense.
Nice anecdote, your childhood sounds like a Hovis ad, but what does it have to do with this incident?
Belongs on Jackanory with all the other stories.
[quote][p][bold]Gribbet[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Sussex jim[/bold] wrote: I had occasion to drive into town one evening after dark, to collect someone from a coach outing by the pier. I passed eleven cyclists en route: none of which had lights on. When I was a boy, and had to cycle, if I ventured out after dark without a light I was invariably stopped by a policeman; who then ordered me to dismount and push the bike home. How times change. And, for the price of a pint, every cyclist could now afford a yellow high-vis vest. You know it makes sense.[/p][/quote]Nice anecdote, your childhood sounds like a Hovis ad, but what does it have to do with this incident?[/p][/quote]Belongs on Jackanory with all the other stories. Barry Trotter

Comments are closed on this article.

click2find

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree