Brighton Festival is back for 2014

Ida Barr is one of the many acts who will perform at this year's Brighton Festival

Ida Barr is one of the many acts who will perform at this year's Brighton Festival

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Brighton Festival is back with close to 450 performances across the first three weeks of May.

The 147 events at 34 venues will include 37 premieres, exclusives and co-commissions along with 26 free events.

Taking over the reins from last year's Argus Angel winning guest director Michael Rosen is the acclaimed choreographer, dancer, musician, composer and performer Hofesh Shechter.

Speaking ahead of this morning's launch, Festival chief executive Andrew Comben paid tribute to him.

He said: “Hofesh's instinctive understanding of Brighton and our Festival means it is particularly pertinent that he steps into the role in 2014 following a highly successful five years of working together.

“Hofesh's creative vision and energy contains that rare quality and sense of adventure that sparks the imaginations of a much wider audience beyond his own discipline and encourages us all to try something new.”

Kicking off this year's Festival, as is tradition, is the Children's Parade on the first Saturday (May 3).

More than 5,000 youngsters from 83 schools will snake around the city to the sound of drums, whistles and the high pitch shrieks of proud parents.

Expert a plethora of colourful and imaginative costumes to match this year's theme of The Arts.

Following the family event will be a new addition to this year's Festival with SoundCity's Pitch Perfect.

Various young musical performers of all genres will be stationed in and around the Royal Pavilion Estate to entertain the masses. So expect folk-duos in the Dome's Cafe-Bar, rock in New Street and jazz in the gardens - all free of course.

The first Saturday evening also sees a standout performance with one of the most influential figures in Russian Theatre debuting his show in the UK.

Dmitry Krymov's Opus No.7, which will take over the Corn Exchange from May 3 to 8, is described as a bewitching blend of genre-blending performance which explores everything from the plight of the Jews in Eastern Europe to the tortured life and career of the Soviet-era composer Dmitri Shostakovich.

Fresh from his experience leading the Children's Parade, this year's guest director Hofesh Shechter will have little time to relax before he brings his smash-hit Sun to the Dome's Concert Hall also on the Saturday night.

It will be followed on the Sunday with a fascinating talk on the making of the piece.

The Sunday (May 4) will also see the author of Trainspotting, Irvine Welsh, in conversation with John Niven.

The Scotsman will talk about his latest book and his raw, uncompromising style at The Old Market show.

Later on in the first week there will be a very special performance in a rather unusual location to celebrate the composer Harrison Birtwistle's 80th birthday.

Opera Down by the Greenwood Side, which was first commissioned by the Festival in 1969, will be revived once more.

Originally performed on the West Pier, it will this time take over the Harvey's Brewery Depot in Lewes.

The second weekend will see Hofesh Shechter back on stage this time for an in conversation event with choreographer William Forsythe.

One of the most accessible and interactive events of the three weeks will also begin on the second Saturday.

The Invisible Flock group will invite residents to the Onca Gallery, in St Georges Place, for a study on happiness.

For ten days the venue will feature a 3D map of the city in which you can plot your own happy memories.

They want to hear about - and more importantly find out where - you had your first kiss, heard you got your job, fell in love or just spent a memorable summer's day.

The results, which will be announced at an event at The Old Market between May 23 and 25, will not only show what makes us happy - but also where.

The second weekend will also be a treat for music lovers with the likes of Mobo-award nominated Zara McFarlane performing at The Old Market (May 11) and Harrison Birtwistle's Orpheus Britannicus in the Royal Pavilion's Music Room (May 11).

The second week will kick off with the best of new theatre from across the country with the three-day biennial showcase Caravan.

Northern Stage's acclaimed production of Catch-22 will roll into town at the Theatre Royal on May 13 before Hofesh Shechter is back with In Good Company 2014 on the Wednesday night (May 14).

The Old Market event will see talented members of his troupe try their hand at choreography.

The following day will see perhaps one of the more fascinating events of this year's programme, Wild Justice.

The Hydrocracker group will lead the Unitarian Church audience in a quest to develop a 21st century revenge play.

Exploring the question of where does justice begin and forgiveness end, the group will be joined by the likes of Jo Berry, whose father was a victim of The Brighton bombing at The Grand.

Rounding off the second week in style will be a Festival exclusive in the shape of a classical musical interpretation of the Tempest in the Dome's Concert Hall (May 16).

The penultimate weekend packs a punch with events across the city. Among the highlights are Turner Prize winning artist Jeremy Deller discussing his favourite photographs (May 16), storytelling in the Stanmer Park with Walking Stories (May 17 and 18) and philosopher AC Grayling discussing his book The God Argument (May 18).

This year's big debate will also fall on the Saturday (May 17) with broadcaster Simon Fanshawe chairing the likely lively discussion on immigration.

The start of the final week is set to be a treat for contemporary music fans with Cat Power (May 18) in the Dome Concert Hall and Peaches performing Andrew Lloyd Webber's rock opera Jesus Christ Superstar accompanied by just a piano at the Theatre Royal (May 19).

The music continues with both classical, KelzMahler at the Dome Concert Hall (May 19), and world, Toumani Diabate and Sidika Diabate at the Theatre Royal (May 20), both covered.

The final Wednesday (May 21) will see one of the more challenging performances with the Vanishing Point group tackling old age, dementia and death, head on.

The world premiere piece, which has been co-produced by the Festival, explores what it is to grow old and be cared for in what is sure to be Festival highlight.

The following day will see a return to more familiar territory with the Globe Theatre group's Much Ado About Nothing in St Nicholas Rest Gardens.

Starting the same day and running through until Saturday is one of the most thrilling circuses around.

The Pirates of the Carabina's acrobats, aerialists, daredevils, stuntmen and musicians, will have audiences wide-eyed and on the edge of their seats throughout their Theatre Royal stint.

Running throughout the Festival will be the usual House Commissions which include the much-hyped Rosanna Martin and Ester Svensson at the Regency Town House.

Yinka Shonibare MBE, the lead artist for 2014 House, will take over the Old Reference Library in Brighton Museum with his installation exploring immigration, displacement, cultural identity and more.

Wrapping up this year's Festival will be a crime festival entitled Dark and Stormy.

The festival within a festival will infiltrate the last few days with a series of fascinating shows.

There will be talks from the likes of Brighton-based crime novelist Peter James (May 23) and About A Boy author - and soon to be crime writer - Tony Parsons (May 24) as well as special screenings of the likes of Down Terrace (May 24) and Daniel Craig's pre-Bond Layer Cake (May 23).

But perhaps most curious will be a panel discussion featuring among others former Secretary of State for Defence Liam Fox and past Director General of MI5 Dame Stella Rimington.

The Dome Concert Hall event, titled Spies: Fact and Fiction, will see the experts discuss how accurate the secret agents from literature are to those in real life.

As is tradition, the Festival will conclude with a major classical music piece, this year from the Philharmonia Orchestra.

The Concert Hall performance (May 24) will journey through a range of 20th century masterpieces including pieces by Ravel and Stravinsky.

Speaking ahead of the launch, Mr Shechter praised the city for inspiring him as an artist.

He said: “Brighton has a magic to it that no one can explain.

“Finding a place where one can develop and grow artistically is a delicate thing, an important thing.

Brighton Dome and Brighton Festival have been an inspiring, energising and encouraging place for my company and me in the last five years.

“It's been a privilege to have been part of the planning for this inspiring event and I feel a rush of excitement about sharing our programme with audiences in Brighton and beyond.”

  • Don't miss The Argus on Monday for your copy of the Festival programme.

Booking opens for Festival members tomorrow morning from 9am. Everyone else has to wait another week to get their hands on tickets.

You can call 01273 709709, book online at brightonfestival.org or in person at the ticket office in New Road, Brighton.

Comments (21)

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9:19am Tue 25 Feb 14

albionite says...

I remember when this festival used to have something for every Brighton resident, young and old. Now it just seems to cater for a small minority.....
I remember when this festival used to have something for every Brighton resident, young and old. Now it just seems to cater for a small minority..... albionite
  • Score: 2

9:20am Tue 25 Feb 14

s&k says...

Don't worry - you won't get any tickets. They all go to Londoners.
Don't worry - you won't get any tickets. They all go to Londoners. s&k
  • Score: 2

10:56am Tue 25 Feb 14

jaykay21 says...

There IS something for everyone and ANYONE can buy tickets. Just go to the Box Office! Also in main article I think Ben James means New ROAD (not Street).
There IS something for everyone and ANYONE can buy tickets. Just go to the Box Office! Also in main article I think Ben James means New ROAD (not Street). jaykay21
  • Score: 3

11:33am Tue 25 Feb 14

albionite says...

jaykay21 wrote:
There IS something for everyone and ANYONE can buy tickets. Just go to the Box Office! Also in main article I think Ben James means New ROAD (not Street).
You sound like you have a vested interest.....
[quote][p][bold]jaykay21[/bold] wrote: There IS something for everyone and ANYONE can buy tickets. Just go to the Box Office! Also in main article I think Ben James means New ROAD (not Street).[/p][/quote]You sound like you have a vested interest..... albionite
  • Score: -3

1:55pm Tue 25 Feb 14

jaykay21 says...

Nope! Just get fed up with people who make negative comments about absolutely everything but contribute nothing positive.
Nope! Just get fed up with people who make negative comments about absolutely everything but contribute nothing positive. jaykay21
  • Score: 7

2:13pm Tue 25 Feb 14

albionite says...

jaykay21 wrote:
Nope! Just get fed up with people who make negative comments about absolutely everything but contribute nothing positive.
Not negative, truthful. Book readings, talks, opera, choreography, contemporary music, debates and classical music are just a few of the 'highlights' listed. All minority entertainment aimed at a minority. Where is the entertainment for the mass majority of Brighton residents?
[quote][p][bold]jaykay21[/bold] wrote: Nope! Just get fed up with people who make negative comments about absolutely everything but contribute nothing positive.[/p][/quote]Not negative, truthful. Book readings, talks, opera, choreography, contemporary music, debates and classical music are just a few of the 'highlights' listed. All minority entertainment aimed at a minority. Where is the entertainment for the mass majority of Brighton residents? albionite
  • Score: 1

3:02pm Tue 25 Feb 14

her professional says...

albionite wrote:
jaykay21 wrote:
Nope! Just get fed up with people who make negative comments about absolutely everything but contribute nothing positive.
Not negative, truthful. Book readings, talks, opera, choreography, contemporary music, debates and classical music are just a few of the 'highlights' listed. All minority entertainment aimed at a minority. Where is the entertainment for the mass majority of Brighton residents?
Such as?
[quote][p][bold]albionite[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]jaykay21[/bold] wrote: Nope! Just get fed up with people who make negative comments about absolutely everything but contribute nothing positive.[/p][/quote]Not negative, truthful. Book readings, talks, opera, choreography, contemporary music, debates and classical music are just a few of the 'highlights' listed. All minority entertainment aimed at a minority. Where is the entertainment for the mass majority of Brighton residents?[/p][/quote]Such as? her professional
  • Score: 2

3:25pm Tue 25 Feb 14

albionite says...

her professional wrote:
albionite wrote:
jaykay21 wrote:
Nope! Just get fed up with people who make negative comments about absolutely everything but contribute nothing positive.
Not negative, truthful. Book readings, talks, opera, choreography, contemporary music, debates and classical music are just a few of the 'highlights' listed. All minority entertainment aimed at a minority. Where is the entertainment for the mass majority of Brighton residents?
Such as?
Ballroom dancing exhibitions / competitions; X-factor / The Voice style shows with local talent; Gareth Malone style choir competition (all hugely popular on tv); battle of the bands; choirs; pop, alternative, reggae, dance, chart bands (Rod Stewart is playing the Amex – could have been part of the festival); comedians; illusionists eg Dynamo; marching bands / brass bands; tea dances; musicals; participation musicals eg Sound of Music, Mama Mia, Rocky Horror…. to name but a few off the top of my head. Not all my cup of tea, but I would imagine there is much more of interest to the average Brightonian in my quick list than in the official schedule. Why all the minority stuff, where does it say the festival has to be so high brow? Its for the whole of Brighton, not just a few.
[quote][p][bold]her professional[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]albionite[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]jaykay21[/bold] wrote: Nope! Just get fed up with people who make negative comments about absolutely everything but contribute nothing positive.[/p][/quote]Not negative, truthful. Book readings, talks, opera, choreography, contemporary music, debates and classical music are just a few of the 'highlights' listed. All minority entertainment aimed at a minority. Where is the entertainment for the mass majority of Brighton residents?[/p][/quote]Such as?[/p][/quote]Ballroom dancing exhibitions / competitions; X-factor / The Voice style shows with local talent; Gareth Malone style choir competition (all hugely popular on tv); battle of the bands; choirs; pop, alternative, reggae, dance, chart bands (Rod Stewart is playing the Amex – could have been part of the festival); comedians; illusionists eg Dynamo; marching bands / brass bands; tea dances; musicals; participation musicals eg Sound of Music, Mama Mia, Rocky Horror…. to name but a few off the top of my head. Not all my cup of tea, but I would imagine there is much more of interest to the average Brightonian in my quick list than in the official schedule. Why all the minority stuff, where does it say the festival has to be so high brow? Its for the whole of Brighton, not just a few. albionite
  • Score: -3

4:46pm Tue 25 Feb 14

Atticus says...

albionite wrote:
her professional wrote:
albionite wrote:
jaykay21 wrote:
Nope! Just get fed up with people who make negative comments about absolutely everything but contribute nothing positive.
Not negative, truthful. Book readings, talks, opera, choreography, contemporary music, debates and classical music are just a few of the 'highlights' listed. All minority entertainment aimed at a minority. Where is the entertainment for the mass majority of Brighton residents?
Such as?
Ballroom dancing exhibitions / competitions; X-factor / The Voice style shows with local talent; Gareth Malone style choir competition (all hugely popular on tv); battle of the bands; choirs; pop, alternative, reggae, dance, chart bands (Rod Stewart is playing the Amex – could have been part of the festival); comedians; illusionists eg Dynamo; marching bands / brass bands; tea dances; musicals; participation musicals eg Sound of Music, Mama Mia, Rocky Horror…. to name but a few off the top of my head. Not all my cup of tea, but I would imagine there is much more of interest to the average Brightonian in my quick list than in the official schedule. Why all the minority stuff, where does it say the festival has to be so high brow? Its for the whole of Brighton, not just a few.
Subjective as is, it is and has always been an arts festival.

The type of mass appeal acts and events you've listed above come to Brighton all year round. You can see then whenever. The Brighton Festival has its appeal because it is condensed into a few weeks. It brings acts in from around the world who would not usually visit, and who I would not be able to see otherwise.

I'm looking forward to it. The fringe too.
[quote][p][bold]albionite[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]her professional[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]albionite[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]jaykay21[/bold] wrote: Nope! Just get fed up with people who make negative comments about absolutely everything but contribute nothing positive.[/p][/quote]Not negative, truthful. Book readings, talks, opera, choreography, contemporary music, debates and classical music are just a few of the 'highlights' listed. All minority entertainment aimed at a minority. Where is the entertainment for the mass majority of Brighton residents?[/p][/quote]Such as?[/p][/quote]Ballroom dancing exhibitions / competitions; X-factor / The Voice style shows with local talent; Gareth Malone style choir competition (all hugely popular on tv); battle of the bands; choirs; pop, alternative, reggae, dance, chart bands (Rod Stewart is playing the Amex – could have been part of the festival); comedians; illusionists eg Dynamo; marching bands / brass bands; tea dances; musicals; participation musicals eg Sound of Music, Mama Mia, Rocky Horror…. to name but a few off the top of my head. Not all my cup of tea, but I would imagine there is much more of interest to the average Brightonian in my quick list than in the official schedule. Why all the minority stuff, where does it say the festival has to be so high brow? Its for the whole of Brighton, not just a few.[/p][/quote]Subjective as is, it is and has always been an arts festival. The type of mass appeal acts and events you've listed above come to Brighton all year round. You can see then whenever. The Brighton Festival has its appeal because it is condensed into a few weeks. It brings acts in from around the world who would not usually visit, and who I would not be able to see otherwise. I'm looking forward to it. The fringe too. Atticus
  • Score: 8

7:41pm Tue 25 Feb 14

her professional says...

albionite wrote:
her professional wrote:
albionite wrote:
jaykay21 wrote:
Nope! Just get fed up with people who make negative comments about absolutely everything but contribute nothing positive.
Not negative, truthful. Book readings, talks, opera, choreography, contemporary music, debates and classical music are just a few of the 'highlights' listed. All minority entertainment aimed at a minority. Where is the entertainment for the mass majority of Brighton residents?
Such as?
Ballroom dancing exhibitions / competitions; X-factor / The Voice style shows with local talent; Gareth Malone style choir competition (all hugely popular on tv); battle of the bands; choirs; pop, alternative, reggae, dance, chart bands (Rod Stewart is playing the Amex – could have been part of the festival); comedians; illusionists eg Dynamo; marching bands / brass bands; tea dances; musicals; participation musicals eg Sound of Music, Mama Mia, Rocky Horror…. to name but a few off the top of my head. Not all my cup of tea, but I would imagine there is much more of interest to the average Brightonian in my quick list than in the official schedule. Why all the minority stuff, where does it say the festival has to be so high brow? Its for the whole of Brighton, not just a few.
Surely there's little point in staging events that are on our TV screens week in week out. I agree a lot of stuff will not be to everyone's taste - that's the nature of art, but it's a good opportunity to have a look at something new, who knows, you might get hooked. We don't all grow up enjoying classical music for example, but it can be a revelation to stumble upon it sometime in our lives. I think you do Brightonians a big injustice if you think they can't cope with something a bit different that maybe gives them a new experience. Have a look at the programme, stuff for families, things under a tenner, children's parade, fringe events and so on. Relax a bit and if nothing else enjoy a bit of the buzz and fun that the event brings to the City.
[quote][p][bold]albionite[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]her professional[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]albionite[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]jaykay21[/bold] wrote: Nope! Just get fed up with people who make negative comments about absolutely everything but contribute nothing positive.[/p][/quote]Not negative, truthful. Book readings, talks, opera, choreography, contemporary music, debates and classical music are just a few of the 'highlights' listed. All minority entertainment aimed at a minority. Where is the entertainment for the mass majority of Brighton residents?[/p][/quote]Such as?[/p][/quote]Ballroom dancing exhibitions / competitions; X-factor / The Voice style shows with local talent; Gareth Malone style choir competition (all hugely popular on tv); battle of the bands; choirs; pop, alternative, reggae, dance, chart bands (Rod Stewart is playing the Amex – could have been part of the festival); comedians; illusionists eg Dynamo; marching bands / brass bands; tea dances; musicals; participation musicals eg Sound of Music, Mama Mia, Rocky Horror…. to name but a few off the top of my head. Not all my cup of tea, but I would imagine there is much more of interest to the average Brightonian in my quick list than in the official schedule. Why all the minority stuff, where does it say the festival has to be so high brow? Its for the whole of Brighton, not just a few.[/p][/quote]Surely there's little point in staging events that are on our TV screens week in week out. I agree a lot of stuff will not be to everyone's taste - that's the nature of art, but it's a good opportunity to have a look at something new, who knows, you might get hooked. We don't all grow up enjoying classical music for example, but it can be a revelation to stumble upon it sometime in our lives. I think you do Brightonians a big injustice if you think they can't cope with something a bit different that maybe gives them a new experience. Have a look at the programme, stuff for families, things under a tenner, children's parade, fringe events and so on. Relax a bit and if nothing else enjoy a bit of the buzz and fun that the event brings to the City. her professional
  • Score: 4

9:42pm Tue 25 Feb 14

From beer to uncertainty says...

albionite wrote:
I remember when this festival used to have something for every Brighton resident, young and old. Now it just seems to cater for a small minority.....
Ahem, hello, sorry...there seems to have been some mistake: surely the dreadful 'bing bong ding dong' music played so often in Pavillion Gardens should be headlining throughout. Anyone hoping for a moment of quiet reflection in the gardens may have experienced the kind of grimness only this appalling, repetitive, video-game style noodling can deliver.
[quote][p][bold]albionite[/bold] wrote: I remember when this festival used to have something for every Brighton resident, young and old. Now it just seems to cater for a small minority.....[/p][/quote]Ahem, hello, sorry...there seems to have been some mistake: surely the dreadful 'bing bong ding dong' music played so often in Pavillion Gardens should be headlining throughout. Anyone hoping for a moment of quiet reflection in the gardens may have experienced the kind of grimness only this appalling, repetitive, video-game style noodling can deliver. From beer to uncertainty
  • Score: 0

8:10am Wed 26 Feb 14

hoveguyactually says...

The John Wilson concerts at the Dome are always a sellout, so how come there is never anything in the Festival for lovers of this type of music? The majority of the audiences for it are mature, so it is an example of a minority being neglected because of the usual Brighton Festival emphasis on youth. And will there be anything included for lovers of jazz, or musicals? Years ago I remember seeing the John Dankworth orchestra with Cleo Laine during the festival. One now has to go to London to see artists of that calibre. Likewise for the great cabaret artists that one can see at the Pheasantry, the St James Theatre and Cafe Zedel. A whole branch of the arts (yes, the Arts) is sadly neglected during the Brighton Festival.
I agree that one of the pleasures of sitting at the cafe in the Pavilion Gardens, is that it is a quiet and peaceful oasis in the heart of a very busy and noisy city. The last thing needed there is yet more loud, noisy music(?).
And since when was New Road renamed New Street? Could this be part of the proposals for the alterations to the Pavilion Estate?
The John Wilson concerts at the Dome are always a sellout, so how come there is never anything in the Festival for lovers of this type of music? The majority of the audiences for it are mature, so it is an example of a minority being neglected because of the usual Brighton Festival emphasis on youth. And will there be anything included for lovers of jazz, or musicals? Years ago I remember seeing the John Dankworth orchestra with Cleo Laine during the festival. One now has to go to London to see artists of that calibre. Likewise for the great cabaret artists that one can see at the Pheasantry, the St James Theatre and Cafe Zedel. A whole branch of the arts (yes, the Arts) is sadly neglected during the Brighton Festival. I agree that one of the pleasures of sitting at the cafe in the Pavilion Gardens, is that it is a quiet and peaceful oasis in the heart of a very busy and noisy city. The last thing needed there is yet more loud, noisy music(?). And since when was New Road renamed New Street? Could this be part of the proposals for the alterations to the Pavilion Estate? hoveguyactually
  • Score: 0

8:11am Wed 26 Feb 14

jaykay21 says...

Such as? Well, how about the drag artist whose pic is in above Argus article, various amazing circus events, hip hop dance event, African dance party, free events at Black Rock, seafront, Pavilion Gdns, Hove Park and other places - and so on? All in this year's programme. You can't expect the Argus to mention absolutely everything in one short article. And I agree - a Festival can't just repeat the kind of things we have during the rest of the year anyway.
Such as? Well, how about the drag artist whose pic is in above Argus article, various amazing circus events, hip hop dance event, African dance party, free events at Black Rock, seafront, Pavilion Gdns, Hove Park and other places - and so on? All in this year's programme. You can't expect the Argus to mention absolutely everything in one short article. And I agree - a Festival can't just repeat the kind of things we have during the rest of the year anyway. jaykay21
  • Score: -1

9:16am Wed 26 Feb 14

albionite says...

Atticus wrote:
albionite wrote:
her professional wrote:
albionite wrote:
jaykay21 wrote:
Nope! Just get fed up with people who make negative comments about absolutely everything but contribute nothing positive.
Not negative, truthful. Book readings, talks, opera, choreography, contemporary music, debates and classical music are just a few of the 'highlights' listed. All minority entertainment aimed at a minority. Where is the entertainment for the mass majority of Brighton residents?
Such as?
Ballroom dancing exhibitions / competitions; X-factor / The Voice style shows with local talent; Gareth Malone style choir competition (all hugely popular on tv); battle of the bands; choirs; pop, alternative, reggae, dance, chart bands (Rod Stewart is playing the Amex – could have been part of the festival); comedians; illusionists eg Dynamo; marching bands / brass bands; tea dances; musicals; participation musicals eg Sound of Music, Mama Mia, Rocky Horror…. to name but a few off the top of my head. Not all my cup of tea, but I would imagine there is much more of interest to the average Brightonian in my quick list than in the official schedule. Why all the minority stuff, where does it say the festival has to be so high brow? Its for the whole of Brighton, not just a few.
Subjective as is, it is and has always been an arts festival.

The type of mass appeal acts and events you've listed above come to Brighton all year round. You can see then whenever. The Brighton Festival has its appeal because it is condensed into a few weeks. It brings acts in from around the world who would not usually visit, and who I would not be able to see otherwise.

I'm looking forward to it. The fringe too.
It is an Arts Festival - performing arts, which covers a huge and varied spectrum. Its supposed to be a festival for the city not niche entertainment and its minority of fans.
[quote][p][bold]Atticus[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]albionite[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]her professional[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]albionite[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]jaykay21[/bold] wrote: Nope! Just get fed up with people who make negative comments about absolutely everything but contribute nothing positive.[/p][/quote]Not negative, truthful. Book readings, talks, opera, choreography, contemporary music, debates and classical music are just a few of the 'highlights' listed. All minority entertainment aimed at a minority. Where is the entertainment for the mass majority of Brighton residents?[/p][/quote]Such as?[/p][/quote]Ballroom dancing exhibitions / competitions; X-factor / The Voice style shows with local talent; Gareth Malone style choir competition (all hugely popular on tv); battle of the bands; choirs; pop, alternative, reggae, dance, chart bands (Rod Stewart is playing the Amex – could have been part of the festival); comedians; illusionists eg Dynamo; marching bands / brass bands; tea dances; musicals; participation musicals eg Sound of Music, Mama Mia, Rocky Horror…. to name but a few off the top of my head. Not all my cup of tea, but I would imagine there is much more of interest to the average Brightonian in my quick list than in the official schedule. Why all the minority stuff, where does it say the festival has to be so high brow? Its for the whole of Brighton, not just a few.[/p][/quote]Subjective as is, it is and has always been an arts festival. The type of mass appeal acts and events you've listed above come to Brighton all year round. You can see then whenever. The Brighton Festival has its appeal because it is condensed into a few weeks. It brings acts in from around the world who would not usually visit, and who I would not be able to see otherwise. I'm looking forward to it. The fringe too.[/p][/quote]It is an Arts Festival - performing arts, which covers a huge and varied spectrum. Its supposed to be a festival for the city not niche entertainment and its minority of fans. albionite
  • Score: 0

9:21am Wed 26 Feb 14

albionite says...

her professional wrote:
albionite wrote:
her professional wrote:
albionite wrote:
jaykay21 wrote:
Nope! Just get fed up with people who make negative comments about absolutely everything but contribute nothing positive.
Not negative, truthful. Book readings, talks, opera, choreography, contemporary music, debates and classical music are just a few of the 'highlights' listed. All minority entertainment aimed at a minority. Where is the entertainment for the mass majority of Brighton residents?
Such as?
Ballroom dancing exhibitions / competitions; X-factor / The Voice style shows with local talent; Gareth Malone style choir competition (all hugely popular on tv); battle of the bands; choirs; pop, alternative, reggae, dance, chart bands (Rod Stewart is playing the Amex – could have been part of the festival); comedians; illusionists eg Dynamo; marching bands / brass bands; tea dances; musicals; participation musicals eg Sound of Music, Mama Mia, Rocky Horror…. to name but a few off the top of my head. Not all my cup of tea, but I would imagine there is much more of interest to the average Brightonian in my quick list than in the official schedule. Why all the minority stuff, where does it say the festival has to be so high brow? Its for the whole of Brighton, not just a few.
Surely there's little point in staging events that are on our TV screens week in week out. I agree a lot of stuff will not be to everyone's taste - that's the nature of art, but it's a good opportunity to have a look at something new, who knows, you might get hooked. We don't all grow up enjoying classical music for example, but it can be a revelation to stumble upon it sometime in our lives. I think you do Brightonians a big injustice if you think they can't cope with something a bit different that maybe gives them a new experience. Have a look at the programme, stuff for families, things under a tenner, children's parade, fringe events and so on. Relax a bit and if nothing else enjoy a bit of the buzz and fun that the event brings to the City.
I think the insult to Brightonians is blindly going on year in year out with a festival that is now of no interest to most locals. There are a huge amount of young people including a huge student population in Brighton - what is there for them? Nothing.
[quote][p][bold]her professional[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]albionite[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]her professional[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]albionite[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]jaykay21[/bold] wrote: Nope! Just get fed up with people who make negative comments about absolutely everything but contribute nothing positive.[/p][/quote]Not negative, truthful. Book readings, talks, opera, choreography, contemporary music, debates and classical music are just a few of the 'highlights' listed. All minority entertainment aimed at a minority. Where is the entertainment for the mass majority of Brighton residents?[/p][/quote]Such as?[/p][/quote]Ballroom dancing exhibitions / competitions; X-factor / The Voice style shows with local talent; Gareth Malone style choir competition (all hugely popular on tv); battle of the bands; choirs; pop, alternative, reggae, dance, chart bands (Rod Stewart is playing the Amex – could have been part of the festival); comedians; illusionists eg Dynamo; marching bands / brass bands; tea dances; musicals; participation musicals eg Sound of Music, Mama Mia, Rocky Horror…. to name but a few off the top of my head. Not all my cup of tea, but I would imagine there is much more of interest to the average Brightonian in my quick list than in the official schedule. Why all the minority stuff, where does it say the festival has to be so high brow? Its for the whole of Brighton, not just a few.[/p][/quote]Surely there's little point in staging events that are on our TV screens week in week out. I agree a lot of stuff will not be to everyone's taste - that's the nature of art, but it's a good opportunity to have a look at something new, who knows, you might get hooked. We don't all grow up enjoying classical music for example, but it can be a revelation to stumble upon it sometime in our lives. I think you do Brightonians a big injustice if you think they can't cope with something a bit different that maybe gives them a new experience. Have a look at the programme, stuff for families, things under a tenner, children's parade, fringe events and so on. Relax a bit and if nothing else enjoy a bit of the buzz and fun that the event brings to the City.[/p][/quote]I think the insult to Brightonians is blindly going on year in year out with a festival that is now of no interest to most locals. There are a huge amount of young people including a huge student population in Brighton - what is there for them? Nothing. albionite
  • Score: 0

9:23am Wed 26 Feb 14

albionite says...

From beer to uncertainty wrote:
albionite wrote:
I remember when this festival used to have something for every Brighton resident, young and old. Now it just seems to cater for a small minority.....
Ahem, hello, sorry...there seems to have been some mistake: surely the dreadful 'bing bong ding dong' music played so often in Pavillion Gardens should be headlining throughout. Anyone hoping for a moment of quiet reflection in the gardens may have experienced the kind of grimness only this appalling, repetitive, video-game style noodling can deliver.
But its not all about you is it....
[quote][p][bold]From beer to uncertainty[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]albionite[/bold] wrote: I remember when this festival used to have something for every Brighton resident, young and old. Now it just seems to cater for a small minority.....[/p][/quote]Ahem, hello, sorry...there seems to have been some mistake: surely the dreadful 'bing bong ding dong' music played so often in Pavillion Gardens should be headlining throughout. Anyone hoping for a moment of quiet reflection in the gardens may have experienced the kind of grimness only this appalling, repetitive, video-game style noodling can deliver.[/p][/quote]But its not all about you is it.... albionite
  • Score: 3

9:27am Wed 26 Feb 14

albionite says...

jaykay21 wrote:
Such as? Well, how about the drag artist whose pic is in above Argus article, various amazing circus events, hip hop dance event, African dance party, free events at Black Rock, seafront, Pavilion Gdns, Hove Park and other places - and so on? All in this year's programme. You can't expect the Argus to mention absolutely everything in one short article. And I agree - a Festival can't just repeat the kind of things we have during the rest of the year anyway.
No, that's right, something for everyone is what it should be. However, unfortunately there is no disguising the fact the vast majority of stuff on is aimed at a minority and of little interest to most, certainly the younger generation.
[quote][p][bold]jaykay21[/bold] wrote: Such as? Well, how about the drag artist whose pic is in above Argus article, various amazing circus events, hip hop dance event, African dance party, free events at Black Rock, seafront, Pavilion Gdns, Hove Park and other places - and so on? All in this year's programme. You can't expect the Argus to mention absolutely everything in one short article. And I agree - a Festival can't just repeat the kind of things we have during the rest of the year anyway.[/p][/quote]No, that's right, something for everyone is what it should be. However, unfortunately there is no disguising the fact the vast majority of stuff on is aimed at a minority and of little interest to most, certainly the younger generation. albionite
  • Score: 0

9:37am Wed 26 Feb 14

albionite says...

Atticus wrote:
albionite wrote:
her professional wrote:
albionite wrote:
jaykay21 wrote:
Nope! Just get fed up with people who make negative comments about absolutely everything but contribute nothing positive.
Not negative, truthful. Book readings, talks, opera, choreography, contemporary music, debates and classical music are just a few of the 'highlights' listed. All minority entertainment aimed at a minority. Where is the entertainment for the mass majority of Brighton residents?
Such as?
Ballroom dancing exhibitions / competitions; X-factor / The Voice style shows with local talent; Gareth Malone style choir competition (all hugely popular on tv); battle of the bands; choirs; pop, alternative, reggae, dance, chart bands (Rod Stewart is playing the Amex – could have been part of the festival); comedians; illusionists eg Dynamo; marching bands / brass bands; tea dances; musicals; participation musicals eg Sound of Music, Mama Mia, Rocky Horror…. to name but a few off the top of my head. Not all my cup of tea, but I would imagine there is much more of interest to the average Brightonian in my quick list than in the official schedule. Why all the minority stuff, where does it say the festival has to be so high brow? Its for the whole of Brighton, not just a few.
Subjective as is, it is and has always been an arts festival.

The type of mass appeal acts and events you've listed above come to Brighton all year round. You can see then whenever. The Brighton Festival has its appeal because it is condensed into a few weeks. It brings acts in from around the world who would not usually visit, and who I would not be able to see otherwise.

I'm looking forward to it. The fringe too.
You can find a lot of similar acts to what is on the festival around Brighton throughout the year as well, although you have to be keen, but most people don't bother, certainly not in numbers, so why should these type of acts dominate the festival? Although showing minority acts, surely the festival should aim to provide more of what the people want, and if the mass appeal acts that you mention are what they want, then that's what they should be offered. It obviously does not appeal to you, but for every one of you, another 99 would attend the event and enjoy it, which is what it is all about, is it not?
[quote][p][bold]Atticus[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]albionite[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]her professional[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]albionite[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]jaykay21[/bold] wrote: Nope! Just get fed up with people who make negative comments about absolutely everything but contribute nothing positive.[/p][/quote]Not negative, truthful. Book readings, talks, opera, choreography, contemporary music, debates and classical music are just a few of the 'highlights' listed. All minority entertainment aimed at a minority. Where is the entertainment for the mass majority of Brighton residents?[/p][/quote]Such as?[/p][/quote]Ballroom dancing exhibitions / competitions; X-factor / The Voice style shows with local talent; Gareth Malone style choir competition (all hugely popular on tv); battle of the bands; choirs; pop, alternative, reggae, dance, chart bands (Rod Stewart is playing the Amex – could have been part of the festival); comedians; illusionists eg Dynamo; marching bands / brass bands; tea dances; musicals; participation musicals eg Sound of Music, Mama Mia, Rocky Horror…. to name but a few off the top of my head. Not all my cup of tea, but I would imagine there is much more of interest to the average Brightonian in my quick list than in the official schedule. Why all the minority stuff, where does it say the festival has to be so high brow? Its for the whole of Brighton, not just a few.[/p][/quote]Subjective as is, it is and has always been an arts festival. The type of mass appeal acts and events you've listed above come to Brighton all year round. You can see then whenever. The Brighton Festival has its appeal because it is condensed into a few weeks. It brings acts in from around the world who would not usually visit, and who I would not be able to see otherwise. I'm looking forward to it. The fringe too.[/p][/quote]You can find a lot of similar acts to what is on the festival around Brighton throughout the year as well, although you have to be keen, but most people don't bother, certainly not in numbers, so why should these type of acts dominate the festival? Although showing minority acts, surely the festival should aim to provide more of what the people want, and if the mass appeal acts that you mention are what they want, then that's what they should be offered. It obviously does not appeal to you, but for every one of you, another 99 would attend the event and enjoy it, which is what it is all about, is it not? albionite
  • Score: 0

10:08am Wed 26 Feb 14

Atticus says...

albionite wrote:
Atticus wrote:
albionite wrote:
her professional wrote:
albionite wrote:
jaykay21 wrote:
Nope! Just get fed up with people who make negative comments about absolutely everything but contribute nothing positive.
Not negative, truthful. Book readings, talks, opera, choreography, contemporary music, debates and classical music are just a few of the 'highlights' listed. All minority entertainment aimed at a minority. Where is the entertainment for the mass majority of Brighton residents?
Such as?
Ballroom dancing exhibitions / competitions; X-factor / The Voice style shows with local talent; Gareth Malone style choir competition (all hugely popular on tv); battle of the bands; choirs; pop, alternative, reggae, dance, chart bands (Rod Stewart is playing the Amex – could have been part of the festival); comedians; illusionists eg Dynamo; marching bands / brass bands; tea dances; musicals; participation musicals eg Sound of Music, Mama Mia, Rocky Horror…. to name but a few off the top of my head. Not all my cup of tea, but I would imagine there is much more of interest to the average Brightonian in my quick list than in the official schedule. Why all the minority stuff, where does it say the festival has to be so high brow? Its for the whole of Brighton, not just a few.
Subjective as is, it is and has always been an arts festival.

The type of mass appeal acts and events you've listed above come to Brighton all year round. You can see then whenever. The Brighton Festival has its appeal because it is condensed into a few weeks. It brings acts in from around the world who would not usually visit, and who I would not be able to see otherwise.

I'm looking forward to it. The fringe too.
You can find a lot of similar acts to what is on the festival around Brighton throughout the year as well, although you have to be keen, but most people don't bother, certainly not in numbers, so why should these type of acts dominate the festival? Although showing minority acts, surely the festival should aim to provide more of what the people want, and if the mass appeal acts that you mention are what they want, then that's what they should be offered. It obviously does not appeal to you, but for every one of you, another 99 would attend the event and enjoy it, which is what it is all about, is it not?
When we called up to book our tickets this morning at 8.20, some of the shows we tried to get tickets for were already sold out. The festival obviously is providing what people want if they're selling out after 50 minutes.

It must be a struggle to go through life with so much resentment that you can't find anything in the whole festival program to get excited about.
[quote][p][bold]albionite[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Atticus[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]albionite[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]her professional[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]albionite[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]jaykay21[/bold] wrote: Nope! Just get fed up with people who make negative comments about absolutely everything but contribute nothing positive.[/p][/quote]Not negative, truthful. Book readings, talks, opera, choreography, contemporary music, debates and classical music are just a few of the 'highlights' listed. All minority entertainment aimed at a minority. Where is the entertainment for the mass majority of Brighton residents?[/p][/quote]Such as?[/p][/quote]Ballroom dancing exhibitions / competitions; X-factor / The Voice style shows with local talent; Gareth Malone style choir competition (all hugely popular on tv); battle of the bands; choirs; pop, alternative, reggae, dance, chart bands (Rod Stewart is playing the Amex – could have been part of the festival); comedians; illusionists eg Dynamo; marching bands / brass bands; tea dances; musicals; participation musicals eg Sound of Music, Mama Mia, Rocky Horror…. to name but a few off the top of my head. Not all my cup of tea, but I would imagine there is much more of interest to the average Brightonian in my quick list than in the official schedule. Why all the minority stuff, where does it say the festival has to be so high brow? Its for the whole of Brighton, not just a few.[/p][/quote]Subjective as is, it is and has always been an arts festival. The type of mass appeal acts and events you've listed above come to Brighton all year round. You can see then whenever. The Brighton Festival has its appeal because it is condensed into a few weeks. It brings acts in from around the world who would not usually visit, and who I would not be able to see otherwise. I'm looking forward to it. The fringe too.[/p][/quote]You can find a lot of similar acts to what is on the festival around Brighton throughout the year as well, although you have to be keen, but most people don't bother, certainly not in numbers, so why should these type of acts dominate the festival? Although showing minority acts, surely the festival should aim to provide more of what the people want, and if the mass appeal acts that you mention are what they want, then that's what they should be offered. It obviously does not appeal to you, but for every one of you, another 99 would attend the event and enjoy it, which is what it is all about, is it not?[/p][/quote]When we called up to book our tickets this morning at 8.20, some of the shows we tried to get tickets for were already sold out. The festival obviously is providing what people want if they're selling out after 50 minutes. It must be a struggle to go through life with so much resentment that you can't find anything in the whole festival program to get excited about. Atticus
  • Score: 0

10:30am Wed 26 Feb 14

albionite says...

Atticus wrote:
albionite wrote:
Atticus wrote:
albionite wrote:
her professional wrote:
albionite wrote:
jaykay21 wrote:
Nope! Just get fed up with people who make negative comments about absolutely everything but contribute nothing positive.
Not negative, truthful. Book readings, talks, opera, choreography, contemporary music, debates and classical music are just a few of the 'highlights' listed. All minority entertainment aimed at a minority. Where is the entertainment for the mass majority of Brighton residents?
Such as?
Ballroom dancing exhibitions / competitions; X-factor / The Voice style shows with local talent; Gareth Malone style choir competition (all hugely popular on tv); battle of the bands; choirs; pop, alternative, reggae, dance, chart bands (Rod Stewart is playing the Amex – could have been part of the festival); comedians; illusionists eg Dynamo; marching bands / brass bands; tea dances; musicals; participation musicals eg Sound of Music, Mama Mia, Rocky Horror…. to name but a few off the top of my head. Not all my cup of tea, but I would imagine there is much more of interest to the average Brightonian in my quick list than in the official schedule. Why all the minority stuff, where does it say the festival has to be so high brow? Its for the whole of Brighton, not just a few.
Subjective as is, it is and has always been an arts festival.

The type of mass appeal acts and events you've listed above come to Brighton all year round. You can see then whenever. The Brighton Festival has its appeal because it is condensed into a few weeks. It brings acts in from around the world who would not usually visit, and who I would not be able to see otherwise.

I'm looking forward to it. The fringe too.
You can find a lot of similar acts to what is on the festival around Brighton throughout the year as well, although you have to be keen, but most people don't bother, certainly not in numbers, so why should these type of acts dominate the festival? Although showing minority acts, surely the festival should aim to provide more of what the people want, and if the mass appeal acts that you mention are what they want, then that's what they should be offered. It obviously does not appeal to you, but for every one of you, another 99 would attend the event and enjoy it, which is what it is all about, is it not?
When we called up to book our tickets this morning at 8.20, some of the shows we tried to get tickets for were already sold out. The festival obviously is providing what people want if they're selling out after 50 minutes.

It must be a struggle to go through life with so much resentment that you can't find anything in the whole festival program to get excited about.
What has the fact that I believe the festival is aimed at a minority got to do with resentment? What a strange comment. Unfortunately your argument does not hold water. A lot of the venues being used are very small so it is hardly surprising if it sells out quickly is it. With over 300.000 people living in the area if only a very small minority of 1% attended a show it would be 3.000 tickets sold, so most venues would be sold out, even though it was a minority attending, so that is a silly argument. I would be interested to know what ticket office was open for calls at 8.20am this morning. What show was it you were after tickets for?
[quote][p][bold]Atticus[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]albionite[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Atticus[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]albionite[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]her professional[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]albionite[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]jaykay21[/bold] wrote: Nope! Just get fed up with people who make negative comments about absolutely everything but contribute nothing positive.[/p][/quote]Not negative, truthful. Book readings, talks, opera, choreography, contemporary music, debates and classical music are just a few of the 'highlights' listed. All minority entertainment aimed at a minority. Where is the entertainment for the mass majority of Brighton residents?[/p][/quote]Such as?[/p][/quote]Ballroom dancing exhibitions / competitions; X-factor / The Voice style shows with local talent; Gareth Malone style choir competition (all hugely popular on tv); battle of the bands; choirs; pop, alternative, reggae, dance, chart bands (Rod Stewart is playing the Amex – could have been part of the festival); comedians; illusionists eg Dynamo; marching bands / brass bands; tea dances; musicals; participation musicals eg Sound of Music, Mama Mia, Rocky Horror…. to name but a few off the top of my head. Not all my cup of tea, but I would imagine there is much more of interest to the average Brightonian in my quick list than in the official schedule. Why all the minority stuff, where does it say the festival has to be so high brow? Its for the whole of Brighton, not just a few.[/p][/quote]Subjective as is, it is and has always been an arts festival. The type of mass appeal acts and events you've listed above come to Brighton all year round. You can see then whenever. The Brighton Festival has its appeal because it is condensed into a few weeks. It brings acts in from around the world who would not usually visit, and who I would not be able to see otherwise. I'm looking forward to it. The fringe too.[/p][/quote]You can find a lot of similar acts to what is on the festival around Brighton throughout the year as well, although you have to be keen, but most people don't bother, certainly not in numbers, so why should these type of acts dominate the festival? Although showing minority acts, surely the festival should aim to provide more of what the people want, and if the mass appeal acts that you mention are what they want, then that's what they should be offered. It obviously does not appeal to you, but for every one of you, another 99 would attend the event and enjoy it, which is what it is all about, is it not?[/p][/quote]When we called up to book our tickets this morning at 8.20, some of the shows we tried to get tickets for were already sold out. The festival obviously is providing what people want if they're selling out after 50 minutes. It must be a struggle to go through life with so much resentment that you can't find anything in the whole festival program to get excited about.[/p][/quote]What has the fact that I believe the festival is aimed at a minority got to do with resentment? What a strange comment. Unfortunately your argument does not hold water. A lot of the venues being used are very small so it is hardly surprising if it sells out quickly is it. With over 300.000 people living in the area if only a very small minority of 1% attended a show it would be 3.000 tickets sold, so most venues would be sold out, even though it was a minority attending, so that is a silly argument. I would be interested to know what ticket office was open for calls at 8.20am this morning. What show was it you were after tickets for? albionite
  • Score: 0

10:55am Wed 26 Feb 14

Atticus says...

albionite wrote:
Atticus wrote:
albionite wrote:
Atticus wrote:
albionite wrote:
her professional wrote:
albionite wrote:
jaykay21 wrote:
Nope! Just get fed up with people who make negative comments about absolutely everything but contribute nothing positive.
Not negative, truthful. Book readings, talks, opera, choreography, contemporary music, debates and classical music are just a few of the 'highlights' listed. All minority entertainment aimed at a minority. Where is the entertainment for the mass majority of Brighton residents?
Such as?
Ballroom dancing exhibitions / competitions; X-factor / The Voice style shows with local talent; Gareth Malone style choir competition (all hugely popular on tv); battle of the bands; choirs; pop, alternative, reggae, dance, chart bands (Rod Stewart is playing the Amex – could have been part of the festival); comedians; illusionists eg Dynamo; marching bands / brass bands; tea dances; musicals; participation musicals eg Sound of Music, Mama Mia, Rocky Horror…. to name but a few off the top of my head. Not all my cup of tea, but I would imagine there is much more of interest to the average Brightonian in my quick list than in the official schedule. Why all the minority stuff, where does it say the festival has to be so high brow? Its for the whole of Brighton, not just a few.
Subjective as is, it is and has always been an arts festival.

The type of mass appeal acts and events you've listed above come to Brighton all year round. You can see then whenever. The Brighton Festival has its appeal because it is condensed into a few weeks. It brings acts in from around the world who would not usually visit, and who I would not be able to see otherwise.

I'm looking forward to it. The fringe too.
You can find a lot of similar acts to what is on the festival around Brighton throughout the year as well, although you have to be keen, but most people don't bother, certainly not in numbers, so why should these type of acts dominate the festival? Although showing minority acts, surely the festival should aim to provide more of what the people want, and if the mass appeal acts that you mention are what they want, then that's what they should be offered. It obviously does not appeal to you, but for every one of you, another 99 would attend the event and enjoy it, which is what it is all about, is it not?
When we called up to book our tickets this morning at 8.20, some of the shows we tried to get tickets for were already sold out. The festival obviously is providing what people want if they're selling out after 50 minutes.

It must be a struggle to go through life with so much resentment that you can't find anything in the whole festival program to get excited about.
What has the fact that I believe the festival is aimed at a minority got to do with resentment? What a strange comment. Unfortunately your argument does not hold water. A lot of the venues being used are very small so it is hardly surprising if it sells out quickly is it. With over 300.000 people living in the area if only a very small minority of 1% attended a show it would be 3.000 tickets sold, so most venues would be sold out, even though it was a minority attending, so that is a silly argument. I would be interested to know what ticket office was open for calls at 8.20am this morning. What show was it you were after tickets for?
The main ticket office was open from 7.30am for Brighton Festival members.

If a 'minority appeal show' manages to sell out, then its equal to a 'majority appeal' show that also sells out. They're both filling a venue regardless of whether *you* want to go or not.

Surely you've gone outside in prior years and seen how vibrant and exciting the city becomes during the festival. Just because *you* don't enjoy something, doesn't mean it holds no merit. Why not dip your toe in the water with some of the free events and see what you might otherwise miss.

If you really are genuinely blind to how wonderful the Brighton Festival is for our city then that's a big loss for you and you're missing out.
[quote][p][bold]albionite[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Atticus[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]albionite[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Atticus[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]albionite[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]her professional[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]albionite[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]jaykay21[/bold] wrote: Nope! Just get fed up with people who make negative comments about absolutely everything but contribute nothing positive.[/p][/quote]Not negative, truthful. Book readings, talks, opera, choreography, contemporary music, debates and classical music are just a few of the 'highlights' listed. All minority entertainment aimed at a minority. Where is the entertainment for the mass majority of Brighton residents?[/p][/quote]Such as?[/p][/quote]Ballroom dancing exhibitions / competitions; X-factor / The Voice style shows with local talent; Gareth Malone style choir competition (all hugely popular on tv); battle of the bands; choirs; pop, alternative, reggae, dance, chart bands (Rod Stewart is playing the Amex – could have been part of the festival); comedians; illusionists eg Dynamo; marching bands / brass bands; tea dances; musicals; participation musicals eg Sound of Music, Mama Mia, Rocky Horror…. to name but a few off the top of my head. Not all my cup of tea, but I would imagine there is much more of interest to the average Brightonian in my quick list than in the official schedule. Why all the minority stuff, where does it say the festival has to be so high brow? Its for the whole of Brighton, not just a few.[/p][/quote]Subjective as is, it is and has always been an arts festival. The type of mass appeal acts and events you've listed above come to Brighton all year round. You can see then whenever. The Brighton Festival has its appeal because it is condensed into a few weeks. It brings acts in from around the world who would not usually visit, and who I would not be able to see otherwise. I'm looking forward to it. The fringe too.[/p][/quote]You can find a lot of similar acts to what is on the festival around Brighton throughout the year as well, although you have to be keen, but most people don't bother, certainly not in numbers, so why should these type of acts dominate the festival? Although showing minority acts, surely the festival should aim to provide more of what the people want, and if the mass appeal acts that you mention are what they want, then that's what they should be offered. It obviously does not appeal to you, but for every one of you, another 99 would attend the event and enjoy it, which is what it is all about, is it not?[/p][/quote]When we called up to book our tickets this morning at 8.20, some of the shows we tried to get tickets for were already sold out. The festival obviously is providing what people want if they're selling out after 50 minutes. It must be a struggle to go through life with so much resentment that you can't find anything in the whole festival program to get excited about.[/p][/quote]What has the fact that I believe the festival is aimed at a minority got to do with resentment? What a strange comment. Unfortunately your argument does not hold water. A lot of the venues being used are very small so it is hardly surprising if it sells out quickly is it. With over 300.000 people living in the area if only a very small minority of 1% attended a show it would be 3.000 tickets sold, so most venues would be sold out, even though it was a minority attending, so that is a silly argument. I would be interested to know what ticket office was open for calls at 8.20am this morning. What show was it you were after tickets for?[/p][/quote]The main ticket office was open from 7.30am for Brighton Festival members. If a 'minority appeal show' manages to sell out, then its equal to a 'majority appeal' show that also sells out. They're both filling a venue regardless of whether *you* want to go or not. Surely you've gone outside in prior years and seen how vibrant and exciting the city becomes during the festival. Just because *you* don't enjoy something, doesn't mean it holds no merit. Why not dip your toe in the water with some of the free events and see what you might otherwise miss. If you really are genuinely blind to how wonderful the Brighton Festival is for our city then that's a big loss for you and you're missing out. Atticus
  • Score: 2

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