The ArgusBT offers £1k reward for help tracking down copper cable thieves who have left large swathes of Brighton and Hove without phone and internet (From The Argus)

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BT offers £1k reward for help tracking down copper cable thieves who have left large swathes of Brighton and Hove without phone and internet

The Argus: Picture by teachingsaggitarian from Flickr Picture by teachingsaggitarian from Flickr

A £1,000 reward has been issued for information leading to the arrest of thieves who took copper cable from Preston Park on Friday, leaving thousands of people in Brighton and Hove without phone and internet access.

Crimestoppers and BT have joined forces to offer the money for any information leading to a successful conviction. 

The cable was cut in Home Road in Preston Park on Friday morning, leading to 1,500 reported faults in the surrounding city.

BT Openreach engineers worked over the weekend to restore service to ensure the disruption was resolved quickly - but some businesses and homeowners are still reporting problems to the Argus.

Crimestoppers Area Manager for Sussex, Carolyn Randall, said: “Not only is this crime hugely inconvenient to the members of the public affected, but it is also incredibly dangerous and can be life threatening.

“Don’t let these individuals benefit from the proceeds of crime. Contact Crimestoppers anonymously, safe in the knowledge that your information will be treated 100 per cent anonymously – no one will ever know you spoke to us.”

Bernie Auguste of Openreach Security said: “We would appeal to local residents to be vigilant and report any suspicious behaviour in or around street cabinets or manhole covers immediately.

"The theft of metal is a continuing problem in the UK, affecting many industry sectors. Through your help BT’s partnership with Crimestoppers has led to arrests and subsequent successful convictions."

If you have any information on this incident please contact Crimestoppers anonymously on 0800 555 111 or through our Anonymous Online Form at www.crimestoppers-uk.org.

Openreach has a partnership with Crimestoppers, which offers up to £1,000 reward for information on cable thieves that lead to arrests and subsequent successful convictions. 

Comments (10)

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12:02pm Tue 25 Feb 14

tykemison says...

Well, well, well!! BT has finally succumbed to the inevitable, they KNEW their boxes were going to be targeted in due course, hence, their"partnership"wi
th crimegrassers.As bt are now a profit over people company I fear this is going to be the tip of the iceberg and am staggered at their stupidity in making this theft common knowledge, unreal . perhaps while they are awaiting a call to crimestoppers, they can stop hijacking(hacking) people's wi-fi!! No sodding BT, I do not want to pay £20 per second for BT open sodding zone when I am already connected to my supplier!!! 1diots
Well, well, well!! BT has finally succumbed to the inevitable, they KNEW their boxes were going to be targeted in due course, hence, their"partnership"wi th crimegrassers.As bt are now a profit over people company I fear this is going to be the tip of the iceberg and am staggered at their stupidity in making this theft common knowledge, unreal . perhaps while they are awaiting a call to crimestoppers, they can stop hijacking(hacking) people's wi-fi!! No sodding BT, I do not want to pay £20 per second for BT open sodding zone when I am already connected to my supplier!!! 1diots tykemison
  • Score: -14

1:06pm Tue 25 Feb 14

qm says...

A whole £1K offered as a reward? BT obviously not taking the matter very seriously then!
That would be less than the CEO's bikkie budget for February . . . .
A whole £1K offered as a reward? BT obviously not taking the matter very seriously then! That would be less than the CEO's bikkie budget for February . . . . qm
  • Score: 2

1:08pm Tue 25 Feb 14

tykemison says...

Why has my comment been voted down? BT hacked into this site too? See if you feel the same when you turn you pc on to do some important work-related research and you cannot use YOUR OWN wi-fi as BT infiltrates your settings so every time you delete BT wifi from your connection the gits have BT open zone to fall back on:-( takes the mickey, but, hey, ho, , until they hack your computer who cares eh? They are a disgraceful company.
Why has my comment been voted down? BT hacked into this site too? See if you feel the same when you turn you pc on to do some important work-related research and you cannot use YOUR OWN wi-fi as BT infiltrates your settings so every time you delete BT wifi from your connection the gits have BT open zone to fall back on:-( takes the mickey, but, hey, ho, , until they hack your computer who cares eh? They are a disgraceful company. tykemison
  • Score: -3

1:28pm Tue 25 Feb 14

Bill in Hanover says...

tykemison wrote:
Well, well, well!! BT has finally succumbed to the inevitable, they KNEW their boxes were going to be targeted in due course, hence, their"partnersh
ip"wi
th crimegrassers.As bt are now a profit over people company I fear this is going to be the tip of the iceberg and am staggered at their stupidity in making this theft common knowledge, unreal . perhaps while they are awaiting a call to crimestoppers, they can stop hijacking(hacking) people's wi-fi!! No sodding BT, I do not want to pay £20 per second for BT open sodding zone when I am already connected to my supplier!!! 1diots
Considering the fact that over 1,000 people lost their service it was already common knowledge, I heard about it at the gym from someone who lost service. and it wasn't actually a 'box' it was an underground cable just to the rear of the Withdean telephone exchange along a remote bridlepath
[quote][p][bold]tykemison[/bold] wrote: Well, well, well!! BT has finally succumbed to the inevitable, they KNEW their boxes were going to be targeted in due course, hence, their"partnersh ip"wi th crimegrassers.As bt are now a profit over people company I fear this is going to be the tip of the iceberg and am staggered at their stupidity in making this theft common knowledge, unreal . perhaps while they are awaiting a call to crimestoppers, they can stop hijacking(hacking) people's wi-fi!! No sodding BT, I do not want to pay £20 per second for BT open sodding zone when I am already connected to my supplier!!! 1diots[/p][/quote]Considering the fact that over 1,000 people lost their service it was already common knowledge, I heard about it at the gym from someone who lost service. and it wasn't actually a 'box' it was an underground cable just to the rear of the Withdean telephone exchange along a remote bridlepath Bill in Hanover
  • Score: 6

1:51pm Tue 25 Feb 14

tykemison says...

Fair point Bill,does not negate the fact BT are a disgraceful bullying company though.
Fair point Bill,does not negate the fact BT are a disgraceful bullying company though. tykemison
  • Score: 0

6:43pm Tue 25 Feb 14

Telscombe Cliffy says...

I'm surprised this activity is not out of control as every street in the land has these copper cables (some covered in lead) with a free unsecure access point (manhole every 100metres or so) and no dangerous voltages present. I am also surprised that when the cable was hacked through in the report above that BT and the police were not down there like a shot because dozens and dozens of burglar alarm line faults would have all come up instantaneously in control rooms all over the place. It wouldn't take too many brain cells to work out where the cable had been cut.
I'm surprised this activity is not out of control as every street in the land has these copper cables (some covered in lead) with a free unsecure access point (manhole every 100metres or so) and no dangerous voltages present. I am also surprised that when the cable was hacked through in the report above that BT and the police were not down there like a shot because dozens and dozens of burglar alarm line faults would have all come up instantaneously in control rooms all over the place. It wouldn't take too many brain cells to work out where the cable had been cut. Telscombe Cliffy
  • Score: 2

7:21pm Tue 25 Feb 14

ARMANA says...

Comon B.T, you can do better than a thousand reward, make it ten grand, you might get one of these low life's to grass up his mate,
Comon B.T, you can do better than a thousand reward, make it ten grand, you might get one of these low life's to grass up his mate, ARMANA
  • Score: 0

7:30pm Tue 25 Feb 14

Bill in Hanover says...

Telscombe Cliffy wrote:
I'm surprised this activity is not out of control as every street in the land has these copper cables (some covered in lead) with a free unsecure access point (manhole every 100metres or so) and no dangerous voltages present. I am also surprised that when the cable was hacked through in the report above that BT and the police were not down there like a shot because dozens and dozens of burglar alarm line faults would have all come up instantaneously in control rooms all over the place. It wouldn't take too many brain cells to work out where the cable had been cut.
Down where 'like a shot'? the cable is hundreds of yards long and is itself alarmed with air pressure. but when the alarm goes off it can mean a breach at any point in the cable. BT may be a useless service provider but remember that the blame lies with the low-lifes who chopped it.
[quote][p][bold]Telscombe Cliffy[/bold] wrote: I'm surprised this activity is not out of control as every street in the land has these copper cables (some covered in lead) with a free unsecure access point (manhole every 100metres or so) and no dangerous voltages present. I am also surprised that when the cable was hacked through in the report above that BT and the police were not down there like a shot because dozens and dozens of burglar alarm line faults would have all come up instantaneously in control rooms all over the place. It wouldn't take too many brain cells to work out where the cable had been cut.[/p][/quote]Down where 'like a shot'? the cable is hundreds of yards long and is itself alarmed with air pressure. but when the alarm goes off it can mean a breach at any point in the cable. BT may be a useless service provider but remember that the blame lies with the low-lifes who chopped it. Bill in Hanover
  • Score: 2

8:44am Wed 26 Feb 14

Telscombe Cliffy says...

Bill in Hanover wrote:
Telscombe Cliffy wrote:
I'm surprised this activity is not out of control as every street in the land has these copper cables (some covered in lead) with a free unsecure access point (manhole every 100metres or so) and no dangerous voltages present. I am also surprised that when the cable was hacked through in the report above that BT and the police were not down there like a shot because dozens and dozens of burglar alarm line faults would have all come up instantaneously in control rooms all over the place. It wouldn't take too many brain cells to work out where the cable had been cut.
Down where 'like a shot'? the cable is hundreds of yards long and is itself alarmed with air pressure. but when the alarm goes off it can mean a breach at any point in the cable. BT may be a useless service provider but remember that the blame lies with the low-lifes who chopped it.
Yes there is the cable pressure alarm too, if it is a pressurised cable. Again, not to difficult to drive the length of cable with the low pressure alarm on, to catch the thieves. It's going to be obvious, vans plus at least two manholes up. A five minute drive end to end, BT have comprehensive maps of all their cable routes. BT need to react more quickly if they really want to stop this.
[quote][p][bold]Bill in Hanover[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Telscombe Cliffy[/bold] wrote: I'm surprised this activity is not out of control as every street in the land has these copper cables (some covered in lead) with a free unsecure access point (manhole every 100metres or so) and no dangerous voltages present. I am also surprised that when the cable was hacked through in the report above that BT and the police were not down there like a shot because dozens and dozens of burglar alarm line faults would have all come up instantaneously in control rooms all over the place. It wouldn't take too many brain cells to work out where the cable had been cut.[/p][/quote]Down where 'like a shot'? the cable is hundreds of yards long and is itself alarmed with air pressure. but when the alarm goes off it can mean a breach at any point in the cable. BT may be a useless service provider but remember that the blame lies with the low-lifes who chopped it.[/p][/quote]Yes there is the cable pressure alarm too, if it is a pressurised cable. Again, not to difficult to drive the length of cable with the low pressure alarm on, to catch the thieves. It's going to be obvious, vans plus at least two manholes up. A five minute drive end to end, BT have comprehensive maps of all their cable routes. BT need to react more quickly if they really want to stop this. Telscombe Cliffy
  • Score: 0

12:17pm Wed 26 Feb 14

Bruce L says...

We are still without phone and internet - 6 days after the incident -

"BT Openreach engineers worked over the weekend to restore service to ensure the disruption was resolved quickly"

I wouldn't call this quick!!
We are still without phone and internet - 6 days after the incident - "BT Openreach engineers worked over the weekend to restore service to ensure the disruption was resolved quickly" I wouldn't call this quick!! Bruce L
  • Score: 1

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