The ArgusHS2 could cost Brighton and Hove £6m (From The Argus)

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HS2 could cost Brighton and Hove £6m

The Argus: Anti-HS2 campaigners with an inflatable white elephant outside last year's Labour Conference in Brighton Anti-HS2 campaigners with an inflatable white elephant outside last year's Labour Conference in Brighton

Brighton and Hove’s economy could lose as much as £6 million a year if the high speed rail line HS2 goes ahead, it has been claimed.

According to an official report, carried out by management consultants KPMG for High Speed 2 Ltd, the city has been identified as one of 50 areas in the UK that will lose out from the project because they are not on the proposed route line.

The research carried out for High Speed 2 Ltd – which has been tasked by the Department for Transport with delivering the new high speed route – suggests Brighton and Hove’s economic output will fall by about £5.84 million a year because of the line, with businesses expecting to invest money in areas closer to the new line, which will link London, Birmingham and Crewe.

The 92-page paper was hailed by the Government who said it would boost the UK economy by as much as £15 billion a year through new jobs, investment and infrastructure.

But HS2 Action Alliance has used the report to suggest the line will actually negatively impact on the country and draw money out of some areas and into others.

Peter Chegwyn, local campaigns director for the HS2 Action Alliance, said: “Brighton and Hove has nothing to gain from HS2 but everything to lose, including jobs and economic output.”

He added: “KPMG admitted its report clearly shows the benefits of HS2 for some regions and the negative impacts it might have on others. HS2 is very bad news for the Brighton and Hove area as jobs could be lost if firms choose to relocate nearer to the new HS2 rail line.”

The same report highlighted that West Sussex could lose as much as £18.43 million.

It also suggested rail services from Arundel, Bognor, Chichester, Crawley, Horsham and Worthing could be reduced to help meet the £50 billion cost of the HS2 project.

Prior to the project’s relaunch, the Department for Transport said the line would help rebalance the economy but admitted it would not serve every city and region in the country.

On Monday, Prime Minister David Cameron told a gathering in Peacehaven that the Government would be spending three times more on other rail and road investments than it would on HS2.

Comments (8)

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12:54pm Wed 26 Mar 14

The Heretic says...

£6 million a year. Sounds a lot, doesn't it? Well, it Is a lot. Now consider this. How much does our city lose in trade every time the railway to London we've got is closed for weekend maintenance and Rail Replacement Buses substituted? Then, there are those unplanned instances of the line going belly-up, which have occurred with monotonous regularity over the past several years. If it's not signalling faults, it's Balcombe Tunnel. This has been happening year in, year out since 1969.

There are signs that 'the powers that be' are coming round - not before time - to the idea of restoring the missing link between Lewes and Uckfield to permit us the luxury of a resilient year-round connection to the capital. Both BML2 and Railfuture have proposals on the table, and the politicos are due to pronounce on their preferred option in the near future, but it's not yet a done deal. Cross party support now exists to do something, and soon, but pressure needs to be kept up by the public and traders alike.

Closure of the GWML due to storm damage earlier this year, cutting off Cornwall by rail, very rapidly produced estimates of the cost to the Cornish economy (population 537,400 in 2012), but you try getting your hands on comparable data for Brighton & Hove (population. 273,400 in 2011). I tried, but neither B&HCC nor B&H Chamber of Commerce had data available. So, I'll have a go myself. The losses to trade etc. in Cornwall were given as £20 million a day (some sources quoted £30 million), an admittedly simplistic calculation for our city, with roughly 50% of the Cornish population comes out at £10 million A DAY, based on the lower estimate for losses out west. Note, that's just Brighton & Hove, not taking Eastbourne, Lewes or Worthing, each with populations around 100,000, into account. Anyone fancy doing the maths?

The KPMG report may well have a point here, but it pales into insignificance beside our known on-going problems, so please, a little perspective here. After all, solving our rail reliability issues won't do an awful lot for Birmingham, Manchester or Sheffield. Then again, you wouldn't expect it to.

So, what's more worrying to our fair city, £6 million a year or £10 million a day? Rather underlines the importance of reliable rail services, doesn't it?
£6 million a year. Sounds a lot, doesn't it? Well, it Is a lot. Now consider this. How much does our city lose in trade every time the railway to London we've got is closed for weekend maintenance and Rail Replacement Buses substituted? Then, there are those unplanned instances of the line going belly-up, which have occurred with monotonous regularity over the past several years. If it's not signalling faults, it's Balcombe Tunnel. This has been happening year in, year out since 1969. There are signs that 'the powers that be' are coming round - not before time - to the idea of restoring the missing link between Lewes and Uckfield to permit us the luxury of a resilient year-round connection to the capital. Both BML2 and Railfuture have proposals on the table, and the politicos are due to pronounce on their preferred option in the near future, but it's not yet a done deal. Cross party support now exists to do something, and soon, but pressure needs to be kept up by the public and traders alike. Closure of the GWML due to storm damage earlier this year, cutting off Cornwall by rail, very rapidly produced estimates of the cost to the Cornish economy (population 537,400 in 2012), but you try getting your hands on comparable data for Brighton & Hove (population. 273,400 in 2011). I tried, but neither B&HCC nor B&H Chamber of Commerce had data available. So, I'll have a go myself. The losses to trade etc. in Cornwall were given as £20 million a day (some sources quoted £30 million), an admittedly simplistic calculation for our city, with roughly 50% of the Cornish population comes out at £10 million A DAY, based on the lower estimate for losses out west. Note, that's just Brighton & Hove, not taking Eastbourne, Lewes or Worthing, each with populations around 100,000, into account. Anyone fancy doing the maths? The KPMG report may well have a point here, but it pales into insignificance beside our known on-going problems, so please, a little perspective here. After all, solving our rail reliability issues won't do an awful lot for Birmingham, Manchester or Sheffield. Then again, you wouldn't expect it to. So, what's more worrying to our fair city, £6 million a year or £10 million a day? Rather underlines the importance of reliable rail services, doesn't it? The Heretic
  • Score: 12

1:04pm Wed 26 Mar 14

Bob_The_Ferret says...

£6m is peanuts compared to the loss through excessive parking charges.
£6m is peanuts compared to the loss through excessive parking charges. Bob_The_Ferret
  • Score: 4

1:07pm Wed 26 Mar 14

PracticeNotTheories says...

Would the Gatwick Express/ Brighton Mainline not be construed as the equivalent of HS2 in this area? We already have the benefit of quick (as noted... not necessarily reliable...) rail services to the capital. So, by not getting HS2... well what would the point be of putting HS2 down to Brighton?

Of course, if they were looking at upgrading the line to allow for faster, more reliable, more comfortable trains (from the 21st century, instead of 25 year old rolling stock that we currently have...) would be welcomed by all...
Would the Gatwick Express/ Brighton Mainline not be construed as the equivalent of HS2 in this area? We already have the benefit of quick (as noted... not necessarily reliable...) rail services to the capital. So, by not getting HS2... well what would the point be of putting HS2 down to Brighton? Of course, if they were looking at upgrading the line to allow for faster, more reliable, more comfortable trains (from the 21st century, instead of 25 year old rolling stock that we currently have...) would be welcomed by all... PracticeNotTheories
  • Score: 3

1:17pm Wed 26 Mar 14

Quiterie says...

I don't believe this "report" for one second. It's been commissioned by High Speed 2 Ltd, so therefore it has to make an economic case for building HS2 - which still has massive opposition.

It is bound to come to the conclusion that business will be drawn away from the South and that the North will become more attractive - how else can they justify spending such a huge amount of money.

Personally I think the opposite will be true and the rail link will draw more businesses to the South.

I don't think we need to worry at all about Brighton and Hove losing out.
I don't believe this "report" for one second. It's been commissioned by High Speed 2 Ltd, so therefore it has to make an economic case for building HS2 - which still has massive opposition. It is bound to come to the conclusion that business will be drawn away from the South and that the North will become more attractive - how else can they justify spending such a huge amount of money. Personally I think the opposite will be true and the rail link will draw more businesses to the South. I don't think we need to worry at all about Brighton and Hove losing out. Quiterie
  • Score: 4

1:45pm Wed 26 Mar 14

The Heretic says...

PracticeNotTheories wrote:
Would the Gatwick Express/ Brighton Mainline not be construed as the equivalent of HS2 in this area? We already have the benefit of quick (as noted... not necessarily reliable...) rail services to the capital. So, by not getting HS2... well what would the point be of putting HS2 down to Brighton?

Of course, if they were looking at upgrading the line to allow for faster, more reliable, more comfortable trains (from the 21st century, instead of 25 year old rolling stock that we currently have...) would be welcomed by all...
Faster and more reliable, certainly (assuming they have the opportunity to demonstrate their superior performance on the overcrowded Brighton line), but comfortable? The images of the new Thameslink stock I've seen suggest that comfort, at least on rush hour services, will be conspicuous by it's absence. If you didn't see them on BBC 'Inside Out' a couple of weeks ago, here's a shot of the interior of one on the BML2 website [ http://www.bml2.co.u
k/the-news/156-story
-stand-up-for-the-br
ighton-line.html }. Happy commuting, folks!!

And we used to call the old 4VEPs 'Cattle Trucks'.
[quote][p][bold]PracticeNotTheories[/bold] wrote: Would the Gatwick Express/ Brighton Mainline not be construed as the equivalent of HS2 in this area? We already have the benefit of quick (as noted... not necessarily reliable...) rail services to the capital. So, by not getting HS2... well what would the point be of putting HS2 down to Brighton? Of course, if they were looking at upgrading the line to allow for faster, more reliable, more comfortable trains (from the 21st century, instead of 25 year old rolling stock that we currently have...) would be welcomed by all...[/p][/quote]Faster and more reliable, certainly (assuming they have the opportunity to demonstrate their superior performance on the overcrowded Brighton line), but comfortable? The images of the new Thameslink stock I've seen suggest that comfort, at least on rush hour services, will be conspicuous by it's absence. If you didn't see them on BBC 'Inside Out' a couple of weeks ago, here's a shot of the interior of one on the BML2 website [ http://www.bml2.co.u k/the-news/156-story -stand-up-for-the-br ighton-line.html }. Happy commuting, folks!! And we used to call the old 4VEPs 'Cattle Trucks'. The Heretic
  • Score: 1

3:17pm Wed 26 Mar 14

Automaton says...

£6 million . Thats nothing compared to the cost of the i360. However the extra 800, 000 people per year visiting will soon make up for the HS2 deficit !
£6 million . Thats nothing compared to the cost of the i360. However the extra 800, 000 people per year visiting will soon make up for the HS2 deficit ! Automaton
  • Score: 4

4:39pm Wed 26 Mar 14

Mark63 says...

£6m loss... hmmm... I see parking charges increasing again - £100 a day to park...
£6m loss... hmmm... I see parking charges increasing again - £100 a day to park... Mark63
  • Score: 2

2:01am Thu 27 Mar 14

whatevernext2013 says...

just think all them london workers might sell up and move up north and free up some wanted housing stock in brighton and prices would also fall ,so its a win win for me
just think all them london workers might sell up and move up north and free up some wanted housing stock in brighton and prices would also fall ,so its a win win for me whatevernext2013
  • Score: 3

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