The ArgusAirport runway debate open to public (From The Argus)

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Gatwick Airport starts public consultation over second runway

The Argus: Airport runway debate open to public Airport runway debate open to public

Gatwick Airport today launches its six-week public consultation on proposals for a second runway.

The three choices being considered for the 3.4 km second runway at the UK's second biggest airport will open at The Hawth in Crawley as the first of 16 public exhibitions.

It will include display boards and visitors can talk to teams from Gatwick and the Airports Commission.

Over the next six weeks, the same exhibition will move to other towns and villages including Horley, Horsham and East Grinstead.

Gatwick Airport Limited (GAL) has said feedback from the public consultation will help improve its second runway proposal to the Airports Commission.

Stewart Wingate, chief executive officer of London Gatwick, said: “We are keen to encourage as many local people as possible to respond to our consultation, as this feedback will have a key role in helping us to refine our runway proposals.

“The consultation is a chance for the local community to find out more about our proposals, ask questions and have their say on our plans for a second runway.”

The proposals have sparked heated arguments on both sides with the Gatwick Diamond Business forum among those in support and the Gatwick Area Conservation Campaign (GACC) among those against it.

Gatwick is consulting on three options: Option 1 is a new runway 585m south of the existing runway, Option 2 would be 1,045m to the south, and Option 3 is also 1,045m to the south, but with the two runways being used independently.

Under Options 1 or 2, one runway would be used for landings and the other for take-offs.

Under Options 2 or 3, a new terminal would also be built between the runways.

Gatwick has established Option 3 as its preferred first choice.

The Airports Commission focused on this option for last December’s Interim Report, describing it as offering “the greatest increase in capacity while still having relatively low environmental and noise impacts compared with some other potential sites.”

Public exhibitions are being held this week at Ghyll Manor Hotel, Rusper, on Monday, April 7, at the Centenary Hall, Smallfield, on Tuesday, April 8 and at Ifield Community College, Ifield, on Wednesday, April 9.

The exhibition continues at the Pavilion Suite at Lingfield Park Racecourse, Lingfield, on Friday, April 11. All are open between 4pm and 7.30pm.

The consultations run until Friday, May 16. For more information visit www.gatwickairport.com/consultation

Comments (6)

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8:47am Sat 5 Apr 14

HJarrs says...

This week the next part of the 2014 IPCC Climate Change Report was released, which describes the forthcoming devastating effects of climate change that we are now beginning to witness. As a country and as individuals we have done very little to protect our precious environment, despite awareness and growing consensus over the last 20 years.

How does building a second runway at Gatwick Airport help us to make radical reduction to our environmental impact?
This week the next part of the 2014 IPCC Climate Change Report was released, which describes the forthcoming devastating effects of climate change that we are now beginning to witness. As a country and as individuals we have done very little to protect our precious environment, despite awareness and growing consensus over the last 20 years. How does building a second runway at Gatwick Airport help us to make radical reduction to our environmental impact? HJarrs
  • Score: -2

12:42pm Sat 5 Apr 14

pachallis says...

HJarrs wrote:
This week the next part of the 2014 IPCC Climate Change Report was released, which describes the forthcoming devastating effects of climate change that we are now beginning to witness. As a country and as individuals we have done very little to protect our precious environment, despite awareness and growing consensus over the last 20 years.

How does building a second runway at Gatwick Airport help us to make radical reduction to our environmental impact?
@HJarrs - as usual, emotive points, but missing the point by miles.

The question being asked here is not IF a new runway should be built, but HOW. The question of where additional airport capacity is needed is still to be answered. IMHO if we need extra capacity then I, as a city resident, much prefer Gatwick to any of the other options I've heard of so far.

If you are talking about general transport planning across all different modes and what is the best way of reducing polluting emissions then that is a different question. How much pollution (NO2 and CO2) comes from aviation and how much from other forms of transport? How much comes from heating and power generation? Is a move to more solar, wind and nuclear the best route?

After the fears of high pollution levels last week perhaps we need to start looking at all major pollution causes in our cities - diesel buses, taxis, delivery vehicles and cars pumping NO2 and particulates into the atmosphere - especially those stuck in stationary queues trying to get to their destinations? Perhaps migration/upgrade of city centre fleets to LPG, CNG or H2 or electrical induction would be more beneficial?

Would more use of natural gas in general (including Shale) be better for the environment than coal or diesel?

IMHO, putting a halt to airport expansion on it's own is not the answer.
[quote][p][bold]HJarrs[/bold] wrote: This week the next part of the 2014 IPCC Climate Change Report was released, which describes the forthcoming devastating effects of climate change that we are now beginning to witness. As a country and as individuals we have done very little to protect our precious environment, despite awareness and growing consensus over the last 20 years. How does building a second runway at Gatwick Airport help us to make radical reduction to our environmental impact?[/p][/quote]@HJarrs - as usual, emotive points, but missing the point by miles. The question being asked here is not IF a new runway should be built, but HOW. The question of where additional airport capacity is needed is still to be answered. IMHO if we need extra capacity then I, as a city resident, much prefer Gatwick to any of the other options I've heard of so far. If you are talking about general transport planning across all different modes and what is the best way of reducing polluting emissions then that is a different question. How much pollution (NO2 and CO2) comes from aviation and how much from other forms of transport? How much comes from heating and power generation? Is a move to more solar, wind and nuclear the best route? After the fears of high pollution levels last week perhaps we need to start looking at all major pollution causes in our cities - diesel buses, taxis, delivery vehicles and cars pumping NO2 and particulates into the atmosphere - especially those stuck in stationary queues trying to get to their destinations? Perhaps migration/upgrade of city centre fleets to LPG, CNG or H2 or electrical induction would be more beneficial? Would more use of natural gas in general (including Shale) be better for the environment than coal or diesel? IMHO, putting a halt to airport expansion on it's own is not the answer. pachallis
  • Score: 5

2:07pm Sat 5 Apr 14

HJarrs says...

Putting an end to airport expansion is a significant step towards addressing climate issues as it would be curtailing the growth of a major polluting industry, one that is single handedly threatening the UK's ability to meet climate committmants.

There is plenty of existing capacity, most of the business flights I witness are not vital and neither should we be concreting over yet more Sussex and polluting just for the opportunity of providing more weekend breaks.

We do need to address emissions from all sectors, but you start by stopping their growth.
Putting an end to airport expansion is a significant step towards addressing climate issues as it would be curtailing the growth of a major polluting industry, one that is single handedly threatening the UK's ability to meet climate committmants. There is plenty of existing capacity, most of the business flights I witness are not vital and neither should we be concreting over yet more Sussex and polluting just for the opportunity of providing more weekend breaks. We do need to address emissions from all sectors, but you start by stopping their growth. HJarrs
  • Score: -5

3:41pm Sat 5 Apr 14

pachallis says...

HJarrs wrote:
Putting an end to airport expansion is a significant step towards addressing climate issues as it would be curtailing the growth of a major polluting industry, one that is single handedly threatening the UK's ability to meet climate committmants.

There is plenty of existing capacity, most of the business flights I witness are not vital and neither should we be concreting over yet more Sussex and polluting just for the opportunity of providing more weekend breaks.

We do need to address emissions from all sectors, but you start by stopping their growth.
@HJarrs- your arrogance knows no bounds - so your views are based on what you 'witness'. Do you make actually make regular flights out of Gatwick?

So perhaps we should also stop all future housing, road and rail expansion inc case this increases emissions (as IMHO there is plenty of existing capacity if we used them better and it is not that 'vital' either)?

Perhaps we should stop any further growth of diesel vehicles in Brighton and Hove and especially stop any further expansion of bus services - as their is already plenty of capacity and it is not that vital?

Should no further diesel vehicles be allowed into the city and to set a good example, perhaps the bus companies,council vehicles and taxi companies should be made to replace all diesel vehicles with low emission ones, perhaps over the next 5 years?

The important thing, IMHO,is to deal with major causes first and then worry about the smaller ones later.

Rather than something based upon what you ' witness' and what you 'believe', please can you provide us with the facts to support you assertion that airlines are a major polluting industry?

What are the other major global polluting industries by size, so that we can determine whether restricting airport expansion will have a significant effect on global air quality, or whether this will have a relatively minor effect vs. other changes? Otherwise this will seem like just another ideological green spin.
[quote][p][bold]HJarrs[/bold] wrote: Putting an end to airport expansion is a significant step towards addressing climate issues as it would be curtailing the growth of a major polluting industry, one that is single handedly threatening the UK's ability to meet climate committmants. There is plenty of existing capacity, most of the business flights I witness are not vital and neither should we be concreting over yet more Sussex and polluting just for the opportunity of providing more weekend breaks. We do need to address emissions from all sectors, but you start by stopping their growth.[/p][/quote]@HJarrs- your arrogance knows no bounds - so your views are based on what you 'witness'. Do you make actually make regular flights out of Gatwick? So perhaps we should also stop all future housing, road and rail expansion inc case this increases emissions (as IMHO there is plenty of existing capacity if we used them better and it is not that 'vital' either)? Perhaps we should stop any further growth of diesel vehicles in Brighton and Hove and especially stop any further expansion of bus services - as their is already plenty of capacity and it is not that vital? Should no further diesel vehicles be allowed into the city and to set a good example, perhaps the bus companies,council vehicles and taxi companies should be made to replace all diesel vehicles with low emission ones, perhaps over the next 5 years? The important thing, IMHO,is to deal with major causes first and then worry about the smaller ones later. Rather than something based upon what you ' witness' and what you 'believe', please can you provide us with the facts to support you assertion that airlines are a major polluting industry? What are the other major global polluting industries by size, so that we can determine whether restricting airport expansion will have a significant effect on global air quality, or whether this will have a relatively minor effect vs. other changes? Otherwise this will seem like just another ideological green spin. pachallis
  • Score: 4

12:44pm Sun 6 Apr 14

HJarrs says...

"The important thing, IMHO,is to deal with major causes first and then worry about the smaller ones later."

Well, building a new runway at Gatwick will generate aircraft traffic with emissions in the order of a big coal fired power station. Gatwick, or rather the planes flying from it are a major source of emissions. That we should address emissions from every area of life does not take away from the need to stop a major development that significantly increases the country's emissions.
"The important thing, IMHO,is to deal with major causes first and then worry about the smaller ones later." Well, building a new runway at Gatwick will generate aircraft traffic with emissions in the order of a big coal fired power station. Gatwick, or rather the planes flying from it are a major source of emissions. That we should address emissions from every area of life does not take away from the need to stop a major development that significantly increases the country's emissions. HJarrs
  • Score: -2

2:01pm Sun 6 Apr 14

pachallis says...

@HJarrs - at the end of the day I do agree that we need to do something about emissions. My real concern is that unless this is done by all countries, multi-laterally,then it is just a waste of time in 'leading by example'.

I'm sure if the UK decided to not increase airport capacity then our EU 'enemies' would be 'over the moon' as they increase their capacity and take business away from the UK.

The increase in airport capacity at Gatwick is slated to provide more jobs and business in the area, and I well imagine, profits for the company that runs it, which IMHO we do need. If Gatwick doesn't expand then the expansion will happen elsewhere instead - possibly hurting the UK economy.

Let's hope that the 2014 IPCC Climate Change Report leads to changes, and that these are done in a pragmatic, realistic, economic way - rather than a purely ideological and incompetent way that the greens have been doing in Brighton & Hove with under-utilised cycle lanes and increased congestion leading to higher local pollution.
@HJarrs - at the end of the day I do agree that we need to do something about emissions. My real concern is that unless this is done by all countries, multi-laterally,then it is just a waste of time in 'leading by example'. I'm sure if the UK decided to not increase airport capacity then our EU 'enemies' would be 'over the moon' as they increase their capacity and take business away from the UK. The increase in airport capacity at Gatwick is slated to provide more jobs and business in the area, and I well imagine, profits for the company that runs it, which IMHO we do need. If Gatwick doesn't expand then the expansion will happen elsewhere instead - possibly hurting the UK economy. Let's hope that the 2014 IPCC Climate Change Report leads to changes, and that these are done in a pragmatic, realistic, economic way - rather than a purely ideological and incompetent way that the greens have been doing in Brighton & Hove with under-utilised cycle lanes and increased congestion leading to higher local pollution. pachallis
  • Score: 2

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