The ArgusFour-year-old bitten by dog (From The Argus)

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Four-year-old bitten by dog

The Argus: Four-year-old bitten by dog Four-year-old bitten by dog

A FOUR-YEAR-OLD boy was bitten by a dog in a “terrifying” attack outside a cafe.

Sonny Bellas was walking along George Street in Hove with his mum Sam when the terrier type dog, which was on a lead, shot out from under a cafe’s table and bit him on his upper thigh.

Mrs Bellas, 43, of Brooker Street, Hove, said: “If it was a baby it could have been killed. It was terrifying.”

Detectives are appealing for help to trace the owner of the dog after the incident outside Marina’s Cafe on Saturday.

Mrs Bellas said Sonny was given antibiotics.

She said the owner said the dog was excited and simply jumped.

Mrs Bellas added: “Paramedics came to treat him because he was in such a state.

She added: “Everyone was coming up to Sonny and asking if he was ok. He was really upset.”

A Sussex Police dog handler was called to the scene to provide specialist support shortly after 3.15pm.

The dog owner is described as being aged in her fifties, of large build, with short wavy ginger brown hair and wearing a patterned blue shawl. The dog owner is described as being aged in her fifties, of large build, with short wavy ginger brown hair and wearing a patterned blue shawl. Police have published her photograph in a bid to try and trace her.

Inspector Di Lewis of the Surrey and Sussex Police Dog Unit said: "We are appealing for witnesses and for the dog owner to come forward.

“This is clearly a worrying attack by a dog on a small child in a public place. We are concerned that although thankfully the injuries were slight on this occasion, there is potential for this to happen again, perhaps with more serious consequences."

"Contact us via 101 or email 101@sussex,pnn.police.uk quoting serial 0838 of 28/6."

Comments (49)

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6:25am Tue 1 Jul 14

Quiterie says...

The photo of the lady the police are trying to trace may be useful?
The photo of the lady the police are trying to trace may be useful? Quiterie
  • Score: 35

6:41am Tue 1 Jul 14

hyram77 says...

Poor little lad. Hope he gets well soon.
Poor little lad. Hope he gets well soon. hyram77
  • Score: 11

8:32am Tue 1 Jul 14

hoveguyactually says...

So where is the photo that the police have published? The owner should be sent on to a dog training course before it happens again.

For a four year old that experience is very frightening. I was suddenly bitten by a dog when I was about the same age, and the memory of it is still with me. It took me many years to voluntarily be near a dog.
So where is the photo that the police have published? The owner should be sent on to a dog training course before it happens again. For a four year old that experience is very frightening. I was suddenly bitten by a dog when I was about the same age, and the memory of it is still with me. It took me many years to voluntarily be near a dog. hoveguyactually
  • Score: 12

8:47am Tue 1 Jul 14

Uberarticuno says...

hoveguyactually wrote:
So where is the photo that the police have published? The owner should be sent on to a dog training course before it happens again.

For a four year old that experience is very frightening. I was suddenly bitten by a dog when I was about the same age, and the memory of it is still with me. It took me many years to voluntarily be near a dog.
Hopefully the dog handler could have helped the boy feel a bit at ease, might have even been able to get the boy close to his or her dog to show the boy shortly after that often dogs are very friendly and he just came across one that was badly trained.

Hope the boy feels better and doesn't fear dogs.
[quote][p][bold]hoveguyactually[/bold] wrote: So where is the photo that the police have published? The owner should be sent on to a dog training course before it happens again. For a four year old that experience is very frightening. I was suddenly bitten by a dog when I was about the same age, and the memory of it is still with me. It took me many years to voluntarily be near a dog.[/p][/quote]Hopefully the dog handler could have helped the boy feel a bit at ease, might have even been able to get the boy close to his or her dog to show the boy shortly after that often dogs are very friendly and he just came across one that was badly trained. Hope the boy feels better and doesn't fear dogs. Uberarticuno
  • Score: 5

8:48am Tue 1 Jul 14

Nobleox says...

......."terryifying attack" read the headlines. Inspector Di Lewis reports injuries were only "slight" - spelling out it was not a terryfying attack at all but probably just a scratch from a "friendly" dog jumping up. And jumping up probably as a result of the child fussing the dog as he and his mother passed by. There wre no other reports of the same dog attacking other people, were there?
......."terryifying attack" read the headlines. Inspector Di Lewis reports injuries were only "slight" - spelling out it was not a terryfying attack at all but probably just a scratch from a "friendly" dog jumping up. And jumping up probably as a result of the child fussing the dog as he and his mother passed by. There wre no other reports of the same dog attacking other people, were there? Nobleox
  • Score: -9

9:18am Tue 1 Jul 14

DC Brighton says...

Nobleox wrote:
......."terryif
ying attack" read the headlines. Inspector Di Lewis reports injuries were only "slight" - spelling out it was not a terryfying attack at all but probably just a scratch from a "friendly" dog jumping up. And jumping up probably as a result of the child fussing the dog as he and his mother passed by. There wre no other reports of the same dog attacking other people, were there?
Utter twit. You don't have kids do you?

No dog should jump up at any child, or adult, for that matter. Let alone bite/scratch it. It is not the trivial event that you lazily suggest. It is very traumatic, especially for a young child. And clearly, it is being treated as such by the police. Well done them.
[quote][p][bold]Nobleox[/bold] wrote: ......."terryif ying attack" read the headlines. Inspector Di Lewis reports injuries were only "slight" - spelling out it was not a terryfying attack at all but probably just a scratch from a "friendly" dog jumping up. And jumping up probably as a result of the child fussing the dog as he and his mother passed by. There wre no other reports of the same dog attacking other people, were there?[/p][/quote]Utter twit. You don't have kids do you? No dog should jump up at any child, or adult, for that matter. Let alone bite/scratch it. It is not the trivial event that you lazily suggest. It is very traumatic, especially for a young child. And clearly, it is being treated as such by the police. Well done them. DC Brighton
  • Score: 5

9:51am Tue 1 Jul 14

Valerie Paynter says...

The natural exuberance of small children is delightful to watch - brightens up the street and I wonde if this young boy was just walking or if he was skipping about. I wonder if the dog is elderly, if it was uncomfortable and felt threatened.

Either way, owners know their animals and how easily (or not) they cope around kids. I have worried too when i see children jump down to pat tethered dogs in the street. I worry when they go face to face with stranger dogs doing this, assuming a waggy tail and a welcome.

Was the lady sitting where her dog's tail was out of the way? In a spot where the dog could have privacy if its temperament needed it. Lots of questions.

I would like to see children being given lessons at school in how to behave around animals of all kinds - dogs, cats, pigeons in the street that I see them chase and throw things at, insects too.

The more crowded and urbanised we get, the more children actually need to be taught about other creatures that may not be in their own home environment (towerblocks and flats).

And dog owners need to realise that noisy, crowded environments and busy streets full of legs and feet close to their heads and bodies are not going to make their dogs happy or comfortable with children and this woman is no doubt feeling awful about what happened.
The natural exuberance of small children is delightful to watch - brightens up the street and I wonde if this young boy was just walking or if he was skipping about. I wonder if the dog is elderly, if it was uncomfortable and felt threatened. Either way, owners know their animals and how easily (or not) they cope around kids. I have worried too when i see children jump down to pat tethered dogs in the street. I worry when they go face to face with stranger dogs doing this, assuming a waggy tail and a welcome. Was the lady sitting where her dog's tail was out of the way? In a spot where the dog could have privacy if its temperament needed it. Lots of questions. I would like to see children being given lessons at school in how to behave around animals of all kinds - dogs, cats, pigeons in the street that I see them chase and throw things at, insects too. The more crowded and urbanised we get, the more children actually need to be taught about other creatures that may not be in their own home environment (towerblocks and flats). And dog owners need to realise that noisy, crowded environments and busy streets full of legs and feet close to their heads and bodies are not going to make their dogs happy or comfortable with children and this woman is no doubt feeling awful about what happened. Valerie Paynter
  • Score: 11

9:56am Tue 1 Jul 14

nissancars says...

im 51 and have always been terrified of dogs all my life and cross over the road if a big dog is coming towards me.i hope the little guy recover well and it doesnt affect him later in life
im 51 and have always been terrified of dogs all my life and cross over the road if a big dog is coming towards me.i hope the little guy recover well and it doesnt affect him later in life nissancars
  • Score: 9

10:11am Tue 1 Jul 14

stevo!! says...

I can fully understand how the mother found the incident terrifying, however, it seems to be just a simple case of a happy dog being overfriendly.

It was on a lead and sitting under a table out of the way of the public. The owner had taken necessary steps to ensure the dog wasn't a trouble to anyone.

Sadly, the boy's skin appears to have been broken resulting in the use of antibiotics and nothing more, but there is no way that this was an 'attack'.

The police aren't treating it as a serious incident, as the report states, and the incident isn't even logged on their website.
I can fully understand how the mother found the incident terrifying, however, it seems to be just a simple case of a happy dog being overfriendly. It was on a lead and sitting under a table out of the way of the public. The owner had taken necessary steps to ensure the dog wasn't a trouble to anyone. Sadly, the boy's skin appears to have been broken resulting in the use of antibiotics and nothing more, but there is no way that this was an 'attack'. The police aren't treating it as a serious incident, as the report states, and the incident isn't even logged on their website. stevo!!
  • Score: 15

10:31am Tue 1 Jul 14

FC says...

Dogs tend to love kids, because they're at "their level".

Yes, you should control your dog and keep it CLOSE in crowded area. However, you also shouldn't overreact in this way over what seems to be a tiny scratch.
Dogs tend to love kids, because they're at "their level". Yes, you should control your dog and keep it CLOSE in crowded area. However, you also shouldn't overreact in this way over what seems to be a tiny scratch. FC
  • Score: 15

10:34am Tue 1 Jul 14

gheese77 says...

When I was a child a similar thing happened to my friend. A Scottie terrier ran right past me and bit my friend in the thigh and ran off. So I don't think this kind of incident is that unusual. at least it wasn't a bigger dog or the injuries could be much worse.

Quite simply dogs should be muzzled in public places - a straightforward change in the law would stop this kind of thing happening.
When I was a child a similar thing happened to my friend. A Scottie terrier ran right past me and bit my friend in the thigh and ran off. So I don't think this kind of incident is that unusual. at least it wasn't a bigger dog or the injuries could be much worse. Quite simply dogs should be muzzled in public places - a straightforward change in the law would stop this kind of thing happening. gheese77
  • Score: 0

10:36am Tue 1 Jul 14

Mrs. Feather says...

Best to use a muzzle like we do for our little dog.
Best to use a muzzle like we do for our little dog. Mrs. Feather
  • Score: 7

10:39am Tue 1 Jul 14

Juleyanne says...

The real world is full of 'risks' of minor misfortunes and incidents. It is impossible to wrap ourselves or children in cotton wool 24/7. I fear we are fast confusing what was simply a small dog reacting through fear to noise, sudden movement or close proximity to a perceived threat to it's owner or itself. It is ridiculous to automatically assume this particular dog is necessarily dangerous because it nipped through fear. However, it is clear that the probably mortified owner had underestimated her dog's discomfort at being in a heavily crowded area close to strangers. If any fingers are to be pointed, it should be at the owner. This dog needs to be socialised and perhaps a muzzle might be a good idea for future walks and some much needed help sought from a professional dog behaviourist might be a good start!
The real world is full of 'risks' of minor misfortunes and incidents. It is impossible to wrap ourselves or children in cotton wool 24/7. I fear we are fast confusing what was simply a small dog reacting through fear to noise, sudden movement or close proximity to a perceived threat to it's owner or itself. It is ridiculous to automatically assume this particular dog is necessarily dangerous because it nipped through fear. However, it is clear that the probably mortified owner had underestimated her dog's discomfort at being in a heavily crowded area close to strangers. If any fingers are to be pointed, it should be at the owner. This dog needs to be socialised and perhaps a muzzle might be a good idea for future walks and some much needed help sought from a professional dog behaviourist might be a good start! Juleyanne
  • Score: 17

10:50am Tue 1 Jul 14

andrewedmondson says...

I wonder how many people reading this have been bitten by a dog? Everyone I know has. It's a myth that the great majority of dog owners are responsible. But of course many dog owners are responsible, training their dogs not to make a noise or be aggressive and cleaning up their mess. Even then, dogs are repellant to may residents who just have to put up with living ins such close proximity to one another.
I wonder how many people reading this have been bitten by a dog? Everyone I know has. It's a myth that the great majority of dog owners are responsible. But of course many dog owners are responsible, training their dogs not to make a noise or be aggressive and cleaning up their mess. Even then, dogs are repellant to may residents who just have to put up with living ins such close proximity to one another. andrewedmondson
  • Score: -6

11:00am Tue 1 Jul 14

Saltdean Resident says...

My little boy was about three when an over excited dog jumped up at him on the Downs, not being aggresive but sacred the life out of my boy, must be like a horse jumping up at you. Needless to say he is now petrified of dogs and has passed that on to his little sister. Hope Sonny is ok and he gets over it.
My little boy was about three when an over excited dog jumped up at him on the Downs, not being aggresive but sacred the life out of my boy, must be like a horse jumping up at you. Needless to say he is now petrified of dogs and has passed that on to his little sister. Hope Sonny is ok and he gets over it. Saltdean Resident
  • Score: -5

11:30am Tue 1 Jul 14

missPgreen says...

I can see where some of these people writing posts are coming from.
A branch of rose bush once sprung up and a thorn scratched me.
I'm petrified of going near a rose bush now.
And as well as muzzling a dog that's "on a lead" in a public place - I believe they should all be made to wear socks too.
Wait in anticipation of the thumbs down now!
I can see where some of these people writing posts are coming from. A branch of rose bush once sprung up and a thorn scratched me. I'm petrified of going near a rose bush now. And as well as muzzling a dog that's "on a lead" in a public place - I believe they should all be made to wear socks too. Wait in anticipation of the thumbs down now! missPgreen
  • Score: 20

12:16pm Tue 1 Jul 14

Patsyr says...

Uberarticuno wrote:
hoveguyactually wrote:
So where is the photo that the police have published? The owner should be sent on to a dog training course before it happens again.

For a four year old that experience is very frightening. I was suddenly bitten by a dog when I was about the same age, and the memory of it is still with me. It took me many years to voluntarily be near a dog.
Hopefully the dog handler could have helped the boy feel a bit at ease, might have even been able to get the boy close to his or her dog to show the boy shortly after that often dogs are very friendly and he just came across one that was badly trained.

Hope the boy feels better and doesn't fear dogs.
I am sure the little boy and his mum were much too frightened to have any further contact with the dog. Why do people (dog owners) always think that young children should like and make a fuss of their dog. I have lost count of the number of dog owners who say things like " He wont hurt you " or " He loves children" when we are in the park.

In my opinion all dogs are unpredictable, and for the protection of people particularly children should be muzzled when in public.
[quote][p][bold]Uberarticuno[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]hoveguyactually[/bold] wrote: So where is the photo that the police have published? The owner should be sent on to a dog training course before it happens again. For a four year old that experience is very frightening. I was suddenly bitten by a dog when I was about the same age, and the memory of it is still with me. It took me many years to voluntarily be near a dog.[/p][/quote]Hopefully the dog handler could have helped the boy feel a bit at ease, might have even been able to get the boy close to his or her dog to show the boy shortly after that often dogs are very friendly and he just came across one that was badly trained. Hope the boy feels better and doesn't fear dogs.[/p][/quote]I am sure the little boy and his mum were much too frightened to have any further contact with the dog. Why do people (dog owners) always think that young children should like and make a fuss of their dog. I have lost count of the number of dog owners who say things like " He wont hurt you " or " He loves children" when we are in the park. In my opinion all dogs are unpredictable, and for the protection of people particularly children should be muzzled when in public. Patsyr
  • Score: -14

12:36pm Tue 1 Jul 14

TheDrive says...

Someone should have given the dog a good hard kick.
Someone should have given the dog a good hard kick. TheDrive
  • Score: -22

12:55pm Tue 1 Jul 14

BellasWay says...

I am Sonnys Mum and am appalled at some of the comments on here & I would love to hear from the person who has checked the police website. You seem to think you know a lot about the incident, perhaps you know the owner and could help with enquiries? The first point I would like to make is the owner was not in the slightest bit concerned and carried on drinking her coffee and smoking her cigarette whilst refusing to give me her details. She then casually walked away while I was speaking to the paramedics on my phone & comforting my son. The second being that my son was passing by the table & had not even seen the dog he was neither fussing or jumping around. We had eaten in the same café & just leaving. As for this not being a 'terrifying' incident I would ask the adult making that comment how they would feel if a Rottweiler jumped at them without warning for that is the equivalent in size ratio? The skin was not scratched but punctured by teeth marks he was screaming in shock. I can absolutely assure you he was 'terrified'! We have brought him up to love all animals but ask the owners permission before approaching any dog & I will continue to help him see that not all dogs are like that. Please believe me when I say our aim was not to sensationalise the incident but to ask for help in finding this irresponsible & arrogant woman. Sam Bellas
I am Sonnys Mum and am appalled at some of the comments on here & I would love to hear from the person who has checked the police website. You seem to think you know a lot about the incident, perhaps you know the owner and could help with enquiries? The first point I would like to make is the owner was not in the slightest bit concerned and carried on drinking her coffee and smoking her cigarette whilst refusing to give me her details. She then casually walked away while I was speaking to the paramedics on my phone & comforting my son. The second being that my son was passing by the table & had not even seen the dog he was neither fussing or jumping around. We had eaten in the same café & just leaving. As for this not being a 'terrifying' incident I would ask the adult making that comment how they would feel if a Rottweiler jumped at them without warning for that is the equivalent in size ratio? The skin was not scratched but punctured by teeth marks he was screaming in shock. I can absolutely assure you he was 'terrified'! We have brought him up to love all animals but ask the owners permission before approaching any dog & I will continue to help him see that not all dogs are like that. Please believe me when I say our aim was not to sensationalise the incident but to ask for help in finding this irresponsible & arrogant woman. Sam Bellas BellasWay
  • Score: 17

1:20pm Tue 1 Jul 14

Man of steel says...

For those of you asking where the picture of the dog owner had been published, try http://www.brightona
ndhovenews.org/2014/
07/01/dog-owner-hunt
ed-by-police-after-b
oy-bitten-in-hove/31
292
For those of you asking where the picture of the dog owner had been published, try http://www.brightona ndhovenews.org/2014/ 07/01/dog-owner-hunt ed-by-police-after-b oy-bitten-in-hove/31 292 Man of steel
  • Score: 1

2:11pm Tue 1 Jul 14

DC Brighton says...

Patsyr wrote:
Uberarticuno wrote:
hoveguyactually wrote:
So where is the photo that the police have published? The owner should be sent on to a dog training course before it happens again.

For a four year old that experience is very frightening. I was suddenly bitten by a dog when I was about the same age, and the memory of it is still with me. It took me many years to voluntarily be near a dog.
Hopefully the dog handler could have helped the boy feel a bit at ease, might have even been able to get the boy close to his or her dog to show the boy shortly after that often dogs are very friendly and he just came across one that was badly trained.

Hope the boy feels better and doesn't fear dogs.
I am sure the little boy and his mum were much too frightened to have any further contact with the dog. Why do people (dog owners) always think that young children should like and make a fuss of their dog. I have lost count of the number of dog owners who say things like " He wont hurt you " or " He loves children" when we are in the park.

In my opinion all dogs are unpredictable, and for the protection of people particularly children should be muzzled when in public.
Couldn't agree more. I had this very argument with a man on the seafront at the weekend (in the bit where dogs are supposed to be on leads by the children's playground for goodness sake). I was ridiculed by the owner with the standard "he's not aggressive", "he's not hurting your son" and ultimately "are you having a laugh?" comments from said idiot when I asked for the dog to be put on a lead. I did this while having to hoist my son away from its attention. He didn't even bother to come and retrieve his dog (comfortably twice the size of my son). It took me to remind him that I would take no pleasure in his kicking his dog very hard to get it to move, but I would be prepared to do it in the very imminent future, before he came and got it.

I had a family dog in my childhood and have nothing against them but if owners let them run up to kids (and let's remember it is that way round - contrary to the comments on here), then they deserve to have them taken away. The same goes for letting them foul the pavement (increasingly common too). Simple.
[quote][p][bold]Patsyr[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Uberarticuno[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]hoveguyactually[/bold] wrote: So where is the photo that the police have published? The owner should be sent on to a dog training course before it happens again. For a four year old that experience is very frightening. I was suddenly bitten by a dog when I was about the same age, and the memory of it is still with me. It took me many years to voluntarily be near a dog.[/p][/quote]Hopefully the dog handler could have helped the boy feel a bit at ease, might have even been able to get the boy close to his or her dog to show the boy shortly after that often dogs are very friendly and he just came across one that was badly trained. Hope the boy feels better and doesn't fear dogs.[/p][/quote]I am sure the little boy and his mum were much too frightened to have any further contact with the dog. Why do people (dog owners) always think that young children should like and make a fuss of their dog. I have lost count of the number of dog owners who say things like " He wont hurt you " or " He loves children" when we are in the park. In my opinion all dogs are unpredictable, and for the protection of people particularly children should be muzzled when in public.[/p][/quote]Couldn't agree more. I had this very argument with a man on the seafront at the weekend (in the bit where dogs are supposed to be on leads by the children's playground for goodness sake). I was ridiculed by the owner with the standard "he's not aggressive", "he's not hurting your son" and ultimately "are you having a laugh?" comments from said idiot when I asked for the dog to be put on a lead. I did this while having to hoist my son away from its attention. He didn't even bother to come and retrieve his dog (comfortably twice the size of my son). It took me to remind him that I would take no pleasure in his kicking his dog very hard to get it to move, but I would be prepared to do it in the very imminent future, before he came and got it. I had a family dog in my childhood and have nothing against them but if owners let them run up to kids (and let's remember it is that way round - contrary to the comments on here), then they deserve to have them taken away. The same goes for letting them foul the pavement (increasingly common too). Simple. DC Brighton
  • Score: 1

3:04pm Tue 1 Jul 14

Uberarticuno says...

BellasWay wrote:
I am Sonnys Mum and am appalled at some of the comments on here & I would love to hear from the person who has checked the police website. You seem to think you know a lot about the incident, perhaps you know the owner and could help with enquiries? The first point I would like to make is the owner was not in the slightest bit concerned and carried on drinking her coffee and smoking her cigarette whilst refusing to give me her details. She then casually walked away while I was speaking to the paramedics on my phone & comforting my son. The second being that my son was passing by the table & had not even seen the dog he was neither fussing or jumping around. We had eaten in the same café & just leaving. As for this not being a 'terrifying' incident I would ask the adult making that comment how they would feel if a Rottweiler jumped at them without warning for that is the equivalent in size ratio? The skin was not scratched but punctured by teeth marks he was screaming in shock. I can absolutely assure you he was 'terrified'! We have brought him up to love all animals but ask the owners permission before approaching any dog & I will continue to help him see that not all dogs are like that. Please believe me when I say our aim was not to sensationalise the incident but to ask for help in finding this irresponsible & arrogant woman. Sam Bellas
Hi Sam, hope your son is feeling better, can I just ask whether the dog handler police officer did help calm Sonny and hopefully show him that not all dogs act in a "hyper" manner?
[quote][p][bold]BellasWay[/bold] wrote: I am Sonnys Mum and am appalled at some of the comments on here & I would love to hear from the person who has checked the police website. You seem to think you know a lot about the incident, perhaps you know the owner and could help with enquiries? The first point I would like to make is the owner was not in the slightest bit concerned and carried on drinking her coffee and smoking her cigarette whilst refusing to give me her details. She then casually walked away while I was speaking to the paramedics on my phone & comforting my son. The second being that my son was passing by the table & had not even seen the dog he was neither fussing or jumping around. We had eaten in the same café & just leaving. As for this not being a 'terrifying' incident I would ask the adult making that comment how they would feel if a Rottweiler jumped at them without warning for that is the equivalent in size ratio? The skin was not scratched but punctured by teeth marks he was screaming in shock. I can absolutely assure you he was 'terrified'! We have brought him up to love all animals but ask the owners permission before approaching any dog & I will continue to help him see that not all dogs are like that. Please believe me when I say our aim was not to sensationalise the incident but to ask for help in finding this irresponsible & arrogant woman. Sam Bellas[/p][/quote]Hi Sam, hope your son is feeling better, can I just ask whether the dog handler police officer did help calm Sonny and hopefully show him that not all dogs act in a "hyper" manner? Uberarticuno
  • Score: 0

3:07pm Tue 1 Jul 14

getThisCoalitionOut says...

TheDrive wrote:
Someone should have given the dog a good hard kick.
I'd like to give you a good hard kick in the crown jewels for saying such a stupid thing
[quote][p][bold]TheDrive[/bold] wrote: Someone should have given the dog a good hard kick.[/p][/quote]I'd like to give you a good hard kick in the crown jewels for saying such a stupid thing getThisCoalitionOut
  • Score: 13

3:34pm Tue 1 Jul 14

stevo!! says...

BellasWay wrote:
I am Sonnys Mum and am appalled at some of the comments on here & I would love to hear from the person who has checked the police website. You seem to think you know a lot about the incident, perhaps you know the owner and could help with enquiries? The first point I would like to make is the owner was not in the slightest bit concerned and carried on drinking her coffee and smoking her cigarette whilst refusing to give me her details. She then casually walked away while I was speaking to the paramedics on my phone & comforting my son. The second being that my son was passing by the table & had not even seen the dog he was neither fussing or jumping around. We had eaten in the same café & just leaving. As for this not being a 'terrifying' incident I would ask the adult making that comment how they would feel if a Rottweiler jumped at them without warning for that is the equivalent in size ratio? The skin was not scratched but punctured by teeth marks he was screaming in shock. I can absolutely assure you he was 'terrified'! We have brought him up to love all animals but ask the owners permission before approaching any dog & I will continue to help him see that not all dogs are like that. Please believe me when I say our aim was not to sensationalise the incident but to ask for help in finding this irresponsible & arrogant woman. Sam Bellas
My knowledge of the incident is from this report and the Sussex Police website. That is why I was able to state with accuracy that the incident was not reported upon it.

The mother claims to have rung for medical attention for her son. Why weren't the police called at the same time, especially as the woman was walking off during the phone call? Even if it weren't a dog patrol the woman could have been detained at the scene.

The Argus claims that the boy was walking past the cafe when the incident occurred. That doesn't tally with the mother's claim that she and her son had been in the cafe and were leaving.

The mother also suggests that the dog in question was comparable in height to a rottweiler. This means that the terrier wouldn't have to 'jump up' in order to bite a child's thigh.

The mother claims that the leg was punctured, which is a very serious injury as far as a dog-bite is concerned, but the police claim that the injury was 'slight'. One of them is wrong.

I can fully understand the claim that the boy and his mother were terrified by what had happened.

If the dog is as dangerous as suggested, we would have heard of other incidents.

Finally, one writer on here hoped that the presence of a police dog would have shown how friendly most dogs are. I can confirm that a police dog would do the exact opposite - they are trained not to be nice.

Let's hope the boy recovers asap.
[quote][p][bold]BellasWay[/bold] wrote: I am Sonnys Mum and am appalled at some of the comments on here & I would love to hear from the person who has checked the police website. You seem to think you know a lot about the incident, perhaps you know the owner and could help with enquiries? The first point I would like to make is the owner was not in the slightest bit concerned and carried on drinking her coffee and smoking her cigarette whilst refusing to give me her details. She then casually walked away while I was speaking to the paramedics on my phone & comforting my son. The second being that my son was passing by the table & had not even seen the dog he was neither fussing or jumping around. We had eaten in the same café & just leaving. As for this not being a 'terrifying' incident I would ask the adult making that comment how they would feel if a Rottweiler jumped at them without warning for that is the equivalent in size ratio? The skin was not scratched but punctured by teeth marks he was screaming in shock. I can absolutely assure you he was 'terrified'! We have brought him up to love all animals but ask the owners permission before approaching any dog & I will continue to help him see that not all dogs are like that. Please believe me when I say our aim was not to sensationalise the incident but to ask for help in finding this irresponsible & arrogant woman. Sam Bellas[/p][/quote]My knowledge of the incident is from this report and the Sussex Police website. That is why I was able to state with accuracy that the incident was not reported upon it. The mother claims to have rung for medical attention for her son. Why weren't the police called at the same time, especially as the woman was walking off during the phone call? Even if it weren't a dog patrol the woman could have been detained at the scene. The Argus claims that the boy was walking past the cafe when the incident occurred. That doesn't tally with the mother's claim that she and her son had been in the cafe and were leaving. The mother also suggests that the dog in question was comparable in height to a rottweiler. This means that the terrier wouldn't have to 'jump up' in order to bite a child's thigh. The mother claims that the leg was punctured, which is a very serious injury as far as a dog-bite is concerned, but the police claim that the injury was 'slight'. One of them is wrong. I can fully understand the claim that the boy and his mother were terrified by what had happened. If the dog is as dangerous as suggested, we would have heard of other incidents. Finally, one writer on here hoped that the presence of a police dog would have shown how friendly most dogs are. I can confirm that a police dog would do the exact opposite - they are trained not to be nice. Let's hope the boy recovers asap. stevo!!
  • Score: 0

5:03pm Tue 1 Jul 14

thevoiceoftruth says...

stevo!! wrote:
BellasWay wrote:
I am Sonnys Mum and am appalled at some of the comments on here & I would love to hear from the person who has checked the police website. You seem to think you know a lot about the incident, perhaps you know the owner and could help with enquiries? The first point I would like to make is the owner was not in the slightest bit concerned and carried on drinking her coffee and smoking her cigarette whilst refusing to give me her details. She then casually walked away while I was speaking to the paramedics on my phone & comforting my son. The second being that my son was passing by the table & had not even seen the dog he was neither fussing or jumping around. We had eaten in the same café & just leaving. As for this not being a 'terrifying' incident I would ask the adult making that comment how they would feel if a Rottweiler jumped at them without warning for that is the equivalent in size ratio? The skin was not scratched but punctured by teeth marks he was screaming in shock. I can absolutely assure you he was 'terrified'! We have brought him up to love all animals but ask the owners permission before approaching any dog & I will continue to help him see that not all dogs are like that. Please believe me when I say our aim was not to sensationalise the incident but to ask for help in finding this irresponsible & arrogant woman. Sam Bellas
My knowledge of the incident is from this report and the Sussex Police website. That is why I was able to state with accuracy that the incident was not reported upon it.

The mother claims to have rung for medical attention for her son. Why weren't the police called at the same time, especially as the woman was walking off during the phone call? Even if it weren't a dog patrol the woman could have been detained at the scene.

The Argus claims that the boy was walking past the cafe when the incident occurred. That doesn't tally with the mother's claim that she and her son had been in the cafe and were leaving.

The mother also suggests that the dog in question was comparable in height to a rottweiler. This means that the terrier wouldn't have to 'jump up' in order to bite a child's thigh.

The mother claims that the leg was punctured, which is a very serious injury as far as a dog-bite is concerned, but the police claim that the injury was 'slight'. One of them is wrong.

I can fully understand the claim that the boy and his mother were terrified by what had happened.

If the dog is as dangerous as suggested, we would have heard of other incidents.

Finally, one writer on here hoped that the presence of a police dog would have shown how friendly most dogs are. I can confirm that a police dog would do the exact opposite - they are trained not to be nice.

Let's hope the boy recovers asap.
What a fascinating analysis. You should market yourself as a cure for insomnia. Zzzzzzzzzzzz.
[quote][p][bold]stevo!![/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]BellasWay[/bold] wrote: I am Sonnys Mum and am appalled at some of the comments on here & I would love to hear from the person who has checked the police website. You seem to think you know a lot about the incident, perhaps you know the owner and could help with enquiries? The first point I would like to make is the owner was not in the slightest bit concerned and carried on drinking her coffee and smoking her cigarette whilst refusing to give me her details. She then casually walked away while I was speaking to the paramedics on my phone & comforting my son. The second being that my son was passing by the table & had not even seen the dog he was neither fussing or jumping around. We had eaten in the same café & just leaving. As for this not being a 'terrifying' incident I would ask the adult making that comment how they would feel if a Rottweiler jumped at them without warning for that is the equivalent in size ratio? The skin was not scratched but punctured by teeth marks he was screaming in shock. I can absolutely assure you he was 'terrified'! We have brought him up to love all animals but ask the owners permission before approaching any dog & I will continue to help him see that not all dogs are like that. Please believe me when I say our aim was not to sensationalise the incident but to ask for help in finding this irresponsible & arrogant woman. Sam Bellas[/p][/quote]My knowledge of the incident is from this report and the Sussex Police website. That is why I was able to state with accuracy that the incident was not reported upon it. The mother claims to have rung for medical attention for her son. Why weren't the police called at the same time, especially as the woman was walking off during the phone call? Even if it weren't a dog patrol the woman could have been detained at the scene. The Argus claims that the boy was walking past the cafe when the incident occurred. That doesn't tally with the mother's claim that she and her son had been in the cafe and were leaving. The mother also suggests that the dog in question was comparable in height to a rottweiler. This means that the terrier wouldn't have to 'jump up' in order to bite a child's thigh. The mother claims that the leg was punctured, which is a very serious injury as far as a dog-bite is concerned, but the police claim that the injury was 'slight'. One of them is wrong. I can fully understand the claim that the boy and his mother were terrified by what had happened. If the dog is as dangerous as suggested, we would have heard of other incidents. Finally, one writer on here hoped that the presence of a police dog would have shown how friendly most dogs are. I can confirm that a police dog would do the exact opposite - they are trained not to be nice. Let's hope the boy recovers asap.[/p][/quote]What a fascinating analysis. You should market yourself as a cure for insomnia. Zzzzzzzzzzzz. thevoiceoftruth
  • Score: 2

5:06pm Tue 1 Jul 14

banargustrolls says...

I feel very sorry for the mother and her son here, only recently was passing Bond St when a dog jumped up at my young son and snapped near his face. Luckily the owner pulled it back with its lead just in time, and we were all shocked. Owner didn't give a ****.
There are simply too many dogs in Brighton now and seem to be the latest must-have object. They flood the beaches even with signs up saying NO DOGS ALLOWED, the owners let them poo throughout parks and pavements and you can't sit down in a park now and simply have a sandwich without being sniffed all over by one of the noisy, horrible things.
I feel very sorry for the mother and her son here, only recently was passing Bond St when a dog jumped up at my young son and snapped near his face. Luckily the owner pulled it back with its lead just in time, and we were all shocked. Owner didn't give a ****. There are simply too many dogs in Brighton now and seem to be the latest must-have object. They flood the beaches even with signs up saying NO DOGS ALLOWED, the owners let them poo throughout parks and pavements and you can't sit down in a park now and simply have a sandwich without being sniffed all over by one of the noisy, horrible things. banargustrolls
  • Score: -10

5:14pm Tue 1 Jul 14

Man of steel says...

Stevo, try reading the news article that I referred to earlier, it clearly states puncture wounds, this means the childs leg was bitten, and the teeth went through his skin, you can call it slight if you wish, but the child had to attend hospital, and I assume will have at least one anti-tetanus jab.
From the way you are defending the dog owner, it seems as if you either know her, or in fact, are her.
A child was bitten, it matters not if he was just walking past, or if he tried to stroke it, he was bitten, and the dog needs putting down.
Stevo, try reading the news article that I referred to earlier, it clearly states puncture wounds, this means the childs leg was bitten, and the teeth went through his skin, you can call it slight if you wish, but the child had to attend hospital, and I assume will have at least one anti-tetanus jab. From the way you are defending the dog owner, it seems as if you either know her, or in fact, are her. A child was bitten, it matters not if he was just walking past, or if he tried to stroke it, he was bitten, and the dog needs putting down. Man of steel
  • Score: -1

5:15pm Tue 1 Jul 14

stevo!! says...

thevoiceoftruth wrote:
stevo!! wrote:
BellasWay wrote:
I am Sonnys Mum and am appalled at some of the comments on here & I would love to hear from the person who has checked the police website. You seem to think you know a lot about the incident, perhaps you know the owner and could help with enquiries? The first point I would like to make is the owner was not in the slightest bit concerned and carried on drinking her coffee and smoking her cigarette whilst refusing to give me her details. She then casually walked away while I was speaking to the paramedics on my phone & comforting my son. The second being that my son was passing by the table & had not even seen the dog he was neither fussing or jumping around. We had eaten in the same café & just leaving. As for this not being a 'terrifying' incident I would ask the adult making that comment how they would feel if a Rottweiler jumped at them without warning for that is the equivalent in size ratio? The skin was not scratched but punctured by teeth marks he was screaming in shock. I can absolutely assure you he was 'terrified'! We have brought him up to love all animals but ask the owners permission before approaching any dog & I will continue to help him see that not all dogs are like that. Please believe me when I say our aim was not to sensationalise the incident but to ask for help in finding this irresponsible & arrogant woman. Sam Bellas
My knowledge of the incident is from this report and the Sussex Police website. That is why I was able to state with accuracy that the incident was not reported upon it.

The mother claims to have rung for medical attention for her son. Why weren't the police called at the same time, especially as the woman was walking off during the phone call? Even if it weren't a dog patrol the woman could have been detained at the scene.

The Argus claims that the boy was walking past the cafe when the incident occurred. That doesn't tally with the mother's claim that she and her son had been in the cafe and were leaving.

The mother also suggests that the dog in question was comparable in height to a rottweiler. This means that the terrier wouldn't have to 'jump up' in order to bite a child's thigh.

The mother claims that the leg was punctured, which is a very serious injury as far as a dog-bite is concerned, but the police claim that the injury was 'slight'. One of them is wrong.

I can fully understand the claim that the boy and his mother were terrified by what had happened.

If the dog is as dangerous as suggested, we would have heard of other incidents.

Finally, one writer on here hoped that the presence of a police dog would have shown how friendly most dogs are. I can confirm that a police dog would do the exact opposite - they are trained not to be nice.

Let's hope the boy recovers asap.
What a fascinating analysis. You should market yourself as a cure for insomnia. Zzzzzzzzzzzz.
Who makes you read my posts?
[quote][p][bold]thevoiceoftruth[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]stevo!![/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]BellasWay[/bold] wrote: I am Sonnys Mum and am appalled at some of the comments on here & I would love to hear from the person who has checked the police website. You seem to think you know a lot about the incident, perhaps you know the owner and could help with enquiries? The first point I would like to make is the owner was not in the slightest bit concerned and carried on drinking her coffee and smoking her cigarette whilst refusing to give me her details. She then casually walked away while I was speaking to the paramedics on my phone & comforting my son. The second being that my son was passing by the table & had not even seen the dog he was neither fussing or jumping around. We had eaten in the same café & just leaving. As for this not being a 'terrifying' incident I would ask the adult making that comment how they would feel if a Rottweiler jumped at them without warning for that is the equivalent in size ratio? The skin was not scratched but punctured by teeth marks he was screaming in shock. I can absolutely assure you he was 'terrified'! We have brought him up to love all animals but ask the owners permission before approaching any dog & I will continue to help him see that not all dogs are like that. Please believe me when I say our aim was not to sensationalise the incident but to ask for help in finding this irresponsible & arrogant woman. Sam Bellas[/p][/quote]My knowledge of the incident is from this report and the Sussex Police website. That is why I was able to state with accuracy that the incident was not reported upon it. The mother claims to have rung for medical attention for her son. Why weren't the police called at the same time, especially as the woman was walking off during the phone call? Even if it weren't a dog patrol the woman could have been detained at the scene. The Argus claims that the boy was walking past the cafe when the incident occurred. That doesn't tally with the mother's claim that she and her son had been in the cafe and were leaving. The mother also suggests that the dog in question was comparable in height to a rottweiler. This means that the terrier wouldn't have to 'jump up' in order to bite a child's thigh. The mother claims that the leg was punctured, which is a very serious injury as far as a dog-bite is concerned, but the police claim that the injury was 'slight'. One of them is wrong. I can fully understand the claim that the boy and his mother were terrified by what had happened. If the dog is as dangerous as suggested, we would have heard of other incidents. Finally, one writer on here hoped that the presence of a police dog would have shown how friendly most dogs are. I can confirm that a police dog would do the exact opposite - they are trained not to be nice. Let's hope the boy recovers asap.[/p][/quote]What a fascinating analysis. You should market yourself as a cure for insomnia. Zzzzzzzzzzzz.[/p][/quote]Who makes you read my posts? stevo!!
  • Score: -5

5:16pm Tue 1 Jul 14

stevo!! says...

Man of steel wrote:
Stevo, try reading the news article that I referred to earlier, it clearly states puncture wounds, this means the childs leg was bitten, and the teeth went through his skin, you can call it slight if you wish, but the child had to attend hospital, and I assume will have at least one anti-tetanus jab.
From the way you are defending the dog owner, it seems as if you either know her, or in fact, are her.
A child was bitten, it matters not if he was just walking past, or if he tried to stroke it, he was bitten, and the dog needs putting down.
I haven't made any comment as to what the wound was like.

Try reading my posts, the ones where I refer to WHAT OTHERS have said about it.
[quote][p][bold]Man of steel[/bold] wrote: Stevo, try reading the news article that I referred to earlier, it clearly states puncture wounds, this means the childs leg was bitten, and the teeth went through his skin, you can call it slight if you wish, but the child had to attend hospital, and I assume will have at least one anti-tetanus jab. From the way you are defending the dog owner, it seems as if you either know her, or in fact, are her. A child was bitten, it matters not if he was just walking past, or if he tried to stroke it, he was bitten, and the dog needs putting down.[/p][/quote]I haven't made any comment as to what the wound was like. Try reading my posts, the ones where I refer to WHAT OTHERS have said about it. stevo!!
  • Score: -5

7:06pm Tue 1 Jul 14

MrHove says...

George street....says it all, such a dive.
hope the kid is ok.
George street....says it all, such a dive. hope the kid is ok. MrHove
  • Score: 6

8:00pm Tue 1 Jul 14

Asleep in Dorset says...

did it have a Uruguayan shirt on ??
did it have a Uruguayan shirt on ?? Asleep in Dorset
  • Score: 8

8:36pm Tue 1 Jul 14

BellasWay says...

Uberarticuno wrote:
BellasWay wrote:
I am Sonnys Mum and am appalled at some of the comments on here & I would love to hear from the person who has checked the police website. You seem to think you know a lot about the incident, perhaps you know the owner and could help with enquiries? The first point I would like to make is the owner was not in the slightest bit concerned and carried on drinking her coffee and smoking her cigarette whilst refusing to give me her details. She then casually walked away while I was speaking to the paramedics on my phone & comforting my son. The second being that my son was passing by the table & had not even seen the dog he was neither fussing or jumping around. We had eaten in the same café & just leaving. As for this not being a 'terrifying' incident I would ask the adult making that comment how they would feel if a Rottweiler jumped at them without warning for that is the equivalent in size ratio? The skin was not scratched but punctured by teeth marks he was screaming in shock. I can absolutely assure you he was 'terrified'! We have brought him up to love all animals but ask the owners permission before approaching any dog & I will continue to help him see that not all dogs are like that. Please believe me when I say our aim was not to sensationalise the incident but to ask for help in finding this irresponsible & arrogant woman. Sam Bellas
Hi Sam, hope your son is feeling better, can I just ask whether the dog handler police officer did help calm Sonny and hopefully show him that not all dogs act in a "hyper" manner?
Yes we had a really lovely dog handler PC Hewson who took Sonny to meet his police dog & it really helped! We have lots of friends & family with gorgeous dogs that he loves so we will continue to teach him about being friendly but cautious around all animals!
[quote][p][bold]Uberarticuno[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]BellasWay[/bold] wrote: I am Sonnys Mum and am appalled at some of the comments on here & I would love to hear from the person who has checked the police website. You seem to think you know a lot about the incident, perhaps you know the owner and could help with enquiries? The first point I would like to make is the owner was not in the slightest bit concerned and carried on drinking her coffee and smoking her cigarette whilst refusing to give me her details. She then casually walked away while I was speaking to the paramedics on my phone & comforting my son. The second being that my son was passing by the table & had not even seen the dog he was neither fussing or jumping around. We had eaten in the same café & just leaving. As for this not being a 'terrifying' incident I would ask the adult making that comment how they would feel if a Rottweiler jumped at them without warning for that is the equivalent in size ratio? The skin was not scratched but punctured by teeth marks he was screaming in shock. I can absolutely assure you he was 'terrified'! We have brought him up to love all animals but ask the owners permission before approaching any dog & I will continue to help him see that not all dogs are like that. Please believe me when I say our aim was not to sensationalise the incident but to ask for help in finding this irresponsible & arrogant woman. Sam Bellas[/p][/quote]Hi Sam, hope your son is feeling better, can I just ask whether the dog handler police officer did help calm Sonny and hopefully show him that not all dogs act in a "hyper" manner?[/p][/quote]Yes we had a really lovely dog handler PC Hewson who took Sonny to meet his police dog & it really helped! We have lots of friends & family with gorgeous dogs that he loves so we will continue to teach him about being friendly but cautious around all animals! BellasWay
  • Score: 6

9:35pm Tue 1 Jul 14

Poem58 says...

"It's only being friendly..." (chomp, bite, etc)
"It's only being friendly..." (chomp, bite, etc) Poem58
  • Score: 0

9:51pm Tue 1 Jul 14

Withdean-er says...

TheDrive wrote:
Someone should have given the dog a good hard kick.
Or the owner, for neither muzzling nor controlling the dog securely in a busy pedestrianised street. Not the dog's fault that the owner's a selfish dope.
[quote][p][bold]TheDrive[/bold] wrote: Someone should have given the dog a good hard kick.[/p][/quote]Or the owner, for neither muzzling nor controlling the dog securely in a busy pedestrianised street. Not the dog's fault that the owner's a selfish dope. Withdean-er
  • Score: 3

9:52pm Tue 1 Jul 14

TheDrive says...

getThisCoalitionOut wrote:
TheDrive wrote:
Someone should have given the dog a good hard kick.
I'd like to give you a good hard kick in the crown jewels for saying such a stupid thing
A little harsh but it seems people agree with you. Personally if a dog attacked one of my kids my emergency response would probably be to attack the dog. I think the problem is that dog owners seem to come in two varieties: people who take no responsibility for the actions of their dogs, or people who think dogs are more important than people.
[quote][p][bold]getThisCoalitionOut[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]TheDrive[/bold] wrote: Someone should have given the dog a good hard kick.[/p][/quote]I'd like to give you a good hard kick in the crown jewels for saying such a stupid thing[/p][/quote]A little harsh but it seems people agree with you. Personally if a dog attacked one of my kids my emergency response would probably be to attack the dog. I think the problem is that dog owners seem to come in two varieties: people who take no responsibility for the actions of their dogs, or people who think dogs are more important than people. TheDrive
  • Score: 2

9:55pm Tue 1 Jul 14

Withdean-er says...

Man of steel wrote:
For those of you asking where the picture of the dog owner had been published, try http://www.brightona

ndhovenews.org/2014/

07/01/dog-owner-hunt

ed-by-police-after-b

oy-bitten-in-hove/31

292
Isn't that an invasion of her human rights under the EC directive blah blah blah? Looking at the pic, there was no way she could control the hound - a pint glass of something in one hand and a cancer-stick in the other.
[quote][p][bold]Man of steel[/bold] wrote: For those of you asking where the picture of the dog owner had been published, try http://www.brightona ndhovenews.org/2014/ 07/01/dog-owner-hunt ed-by-police-after-b oy-bitten-in-hove/31 292[/p][/quote]Isn't that an invasion of her human rights under the EC directive blah blah blah? Looking at the pic, there was no way she could control the hound - a pint glass of something in one hand and a cancer-stick in the other. Withdean-er
  • Score: 2

9:55pm Tue 1 Jul 14

BellasWay says...

stevo!! wrote:
BellasWay wrote:
I am Sonnys Mum and am appalled at some of the comments on here & I would love to hear from the person who has checked the police website. You seem to think you know a lot about the incident, perhaps you know the owner and could help with enquiries? The first point I would like to make is the owner was not in the slightest bit concerned and carried on drinking her coffee and smoking her cigarette whilst refusing to give me her details. She then casually walked away while I was speaking to the paramedics on my phone & comforting my son. The second being that my son was passing by the table & had not even seen the dog he was neither fussing or jumping around. We had eaten in the same café & just leaving. As for this not being a 'terrifying' incident I would ask the adult making that comment how they would feel if a Rottweiler jumped at them without warning for that is the equivalent in size ratio? The skin was not scratched but punctured by teeth marks he was screaming in shock. I can absolutely assure you he was 'terrified'! We have brought him up to love all animals but ask the owners permission before approaching any dog & I will continue to help him see that not all dogs are like that. Please believe me when I say our aim was not to sensationalise the incident but to ask for help in finding this irresponsible & arrogant woman. Sam Bellas
My knowledge of the incident is from this report and the Sussex Police website. That is why I was able to state with accuracy that the incident was not reported upon it.

The mother claims to have rung for medical attention for her son. Why weren't the police called at the same time, especially as the woman was walking off during the phone call? Even if it weren't a dog patrol the woman could have been detained at the scene.

The Argus claims that the boy was walking past the cafe when the incident occurred. That doesn't tally with the mother's claim that she and her son had been in the cafe and were leaving.

The mother also suggests that the dog in question was comparable in height to a rottweiler. This means that the terrier wouldn't have to 'jump up' in order to bite a child's thigh.

The mother claims that the leg was punctured, which is a very serious injury as far as a dog-bite is concerned, but the police claim that the injury was 'slight'. One of them is wrong.

I can fully understand the claim that the boy and his mother were terrified by what had happened.

If the dog is as dangerous as suggested, we would have heard of other incidents.

Finally, one writer on here hoped that the presence of a police dog would have shown how friendly most dogs are. I can confirm that a police dog would do the exact opposite - they are trained not to be nice.

Let's hope the boy recovers asap.
I am really concerned about your involvement in this case, you seem to have a very deep interest in' facts' that you know nothing about, but have no fear 'Stevo' I will happily dissect the points I have made so that is easier for you to understand.

1.The police were called in the 1st instance as the woman was so dismissive of my sons injury & refusing to give her details, they then sent the paramedics as my son is so young!
2. We were inside the café and came outside passing a row of tables in the street or you could say 'walking past the cafe' to which several people have given statements!
3. Please re-read my comment regarding the Rottweiler, I was pointing out the height - ratio for a child with a smaller dog to an adult with a larger dog I would have thought your attention to detail would have spotted that!
4. It was definitely a puncture wound & maybe not a serious wound but bad enough to hurt! Incidentally he was given antibiotics because this hideous woman did not hang around to give us any details about her or of the dogs history!
5. You seem to have the air of someone who is 'knowledgeable on all subjects but master of none', if you had ever spoke to a police dog handler they would tell you the same as they told my son, the dog will react only on the command given but are a wonderful example of good training & loyalty. My son met a huge police dog shortly after the incident & felt very safe in his company!

I hope that this has cleared up any confusion over the incident & the article? However should you have any more time on your hands to debate the accuracy of reporting such stories I'm sure that Crime Stoppers would be interested in your assistance!
Kind Regards
The Mother Of A Little Boy Shocked Out Of His Skin!
[quote][p][bold]stevo!![/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]BellasWay[/bold] wrote: I am Sonnys Mum and am appalled at some of the comments on here & I would love to hear from the person who has checked the police website. You seem to think you know a lot about the incident, perhaps you know the owner and could help with enquiries? The first point I would like to make is the owner was not in the slightest bit concerned and carried on drinking her coffee and smoking her cigarette whilst refusing to give me her details. She then casually walked away while I was speaking to the paramedics on my phone & comforting my son. The second being that my son was passing by the table & had not even seen the dog he was neither fussing or jumping around. We had eaten in the same café & just leaving. As for this not being a 'terrifying' incident I would ask the adult making that comment how they would feel if a Rottweiler jumped at them without warning for that is the equivalent in size ratio? The skin was not scratched but punctured by teeth marks he was screaming in shock. I can absolutely assure you he was 'terrified'! We have brought him up to love all animals but ask the owners permission before approaching any dog & I will continue to help him see that not all dogs are like that. Please believe me when I say our aim was not to sensationalise the incident but to ask for help in finding this irresponsible & arrogant woman. Sam Bellas[/p][/quote]My knowledge of the incident is from this report and the Sussex Police website. That is why I was able to state with accuracy that the incident was not reported upon it. The mother claims to have rung for medical attention for her son. Why weren't the police called at the same time, especially as the woman was walking off during the phone call? Even if it weren't a dog patrol the woman could have been detained at the scene. The Argus claims that the boy was walking past the cafe when the incident occurred. That doesn't tally with the mother's claim that she and her son had been in the cafe and were leaving. The mother also suggests that the dog in question was comparable in height to a rottweiler. This means that the terrier wouldn't have to 'jump up' in order to bite a child's thigh. The mother claims that the leg was punctured, which is a very serious injury as far as a dog-bite is concerned, but the police claim that the injury was 'slight'. One of them is wrong. I can fully understand the claim that the boy and his mother were terrified by what had happened. If the dog is as dangerous as suggested, we would have heard of other incidents. Finally, one writer on here hoped that the presence of a police dog would have shown how friendly most dogs are. I can confirm that a police dog would do the exact opposite - they are trained not to be nice. Let's hope the boy recovers asap.[/p][/quote]I am really concerned about your involvement in this case, you seem to have a very deep interest in' facts' that you know nothing about, but have no fear 'Stevo' I will happily dissect the points I have made so that is easier for you to understand. 1.The police were called in the 1st instance as the woman was so dismissive of my sons injury & refusing to give her details, they then sent the paramedics as my son is so young! 2. We were inside the café and came outside passing a row of tables in the street or you could say 'walking past the cafe' to which several people have given statements! 3. Please re-read my comment regarding the Rottweiler, I was pointing out the height - ratio for a child with a smaller dog to an adult with a larger dog I would have thought your attention to detail would have spotted that! 4. It was definitely a puncture wound & maybe not a serious wound but bad enough to hurt! Incidentally he was given antibiotics because this hideous woman did not hang around to give us any details about her or of the dogs history! 5. You seem to have the air of someone who is 'knowledgeable on all subjects but master of none', if you had ever spoke to a police dog handler they would tell you the same as they told my son, the dog will react only on the command given but are a wonderful example of good training & loyalty. My son met a huge police dog shortly after the incident & felt very safe in his company! I hope that this has cleared up any confusion over the incident & the article? However should you have any more time on your hands to debate the accuracy of reporting such stories I'm sure that Crime Stoppers would be interested in your assistance! Kind Regards The Mother Of A Little Boy Shocked Out Of His Skin! BellasWay
  • Score: 8

10:26pm Tue 1 Jul 14

Withdean-er says...

BellasWay wrote:
stevo!! wrote:
BellasWay wrote:
I am Sonnys Mum and am appalled at some of the comments on here & I would love to hear from the person who has checked the police website. You seem to think you know a lot about the incident, perhaps you know the owner and could help with enquiries? The first point I would like to make is the owner was not in the slightest bit concerned and carried on drinking her coffee and smoking her cigarette whilst refusing to give me her details. She then casually walked away while I was speaking to the paramedics on my phone & comforting my son. The second being that my son was passing by the table & had not even seen the dog he was neither fussing or jumping around. We had eaten in the same café & just leaving. As for this not being a 'terrifying' incident I would ask the adult making that comment how they would feel if a Rottweiler jumped at them without warning for that is the equivalent in size ratio? The skin was not scratched but punctured by teeth marks he was screaming in shock. I can absolutely assure you he was 'terrified'! We have brought him up to love all animals but ask the owners permission before approaching any dog & I will continue to help him see that not all dogs are like that. Please believe me when I say our aim was not to sensationalise the incident but to ask for help in finding this irresponsible & arrogant woman. Sam Bellas
My knowledge of the incident is from this report and the Sussex Police website. That is why I was able to state with accuracy that the incident was not reported upon it.

The mother claims to have rung for medical attention for her son. Why weren't the police called at the same time, especially as the woman was walking off during the phone call? Even if it weren't a dog patrol the woman could have been detained at the scene.

The Argus claims that the boy was walking past the cafe when the incident occurred. That doesn't tally with the mother's claim that she and her son had been in the cafe and were leaving.

The mother also suggests that the dog in question was comparable in height to a rottweiler. This means that the terrier wouldn't have to 'jump up' in order to bite a child's thigh.

The mother claims that the leg was punctured, which is a very serious injury as far as a dog-bite is concerned, but the police claim that the injury was 'slight'. One of them is wrong.

I can fully understand the claim that the boy and his mother were terrified by what had happened.

If the dog is as dangerous as suggested, we would have heard of other incidents.

Finally, one writer on here hoped that the presence of a police dog would have shown how friendly most dogs are. I can confirm that a police dog would do the exact opposite - they are trained not to be nice.

Let's hope the boy recovers asap.
I am really concerned about your involvement in this case, you seem to have a very deep interest in' facts' that you know nothing about, but have no fear 'Stevo' I will happily dissect the points I have made so that is easier for you to understand.

1.The police were called in the 1st instance as the woman was so dismissive of my sons injury & refusing to give her details, they then sent the paramedics as my son is so young!
2. We were inside the café and came outside passing a row of tables in the street or you could say 'walking past the cafe' to which several people have given statements!
3. Please re-read my comment regarding the Rottweiler, I was pointing out the height - ratio for a child with a smaller dog to an adult with a larger dog I would have thought your attention to detail would have spotted that!
4. It was definitely a puncture wound & maybe not a serious wound but bad enough to hurt! Incidentally he was given antibiotics because this hideous woman did not hang around to give us any details about her or of the dogs history!
5. You seem to have the air of someone who is 'knowledgeable on all subjects but master of none', if you had ever spoke to a police dog handler they would tell you the same as they told my son, the dog will react only on the command given but are a wonderful example of good training & loyalty. My son met a huge police dog shortly after the incident & felt very safe in his company!

I hope that this has cleared up any confusion over the incident & the article? However should you have any more time on your hands to debate the accuracy of reporting such stories I'm sure that Crime Stoppers would be interested in your assistance!
Kind Regards
The Mother Of A Little Boy Shocked Out Of His Skin!
I lean to believe the version of events given by you and the Police statements, rather than speculators and blinkered defenders of all dogs and dog-owners in this thread. I adore animals as much anyone else, but this owner seemingly didn't control her dog, and conveniently didn't hang around for the law to take a considered view.

The Argus need to publish the her very clear photo (as per the other website).

Hoping your son makes a full recovery soon. Just my view, but gently giving him contact with (stable) dogs sooner rather than later will temper any phobia building up.
[quote][p][bold]BellasWay[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]stevo!![/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]BellasWay[/bold] wrote: I am Sonnys Mum and am appalled at some of the comments on here & I would love to hear from the person who has checked the police website. You seem to think you know a lot about the incident, perhaps you know the owner and could help with enquiries? The first point I would like to make is the owner was not in the slightest bit concerned and carried on drinking her coffee and smoking her cigarette whilst refusing to give me her details. She then casually walked away while I was speaking to the paramedics on my phone & comforting my son. The second being that my son was passing by the table & had not even seen the dog he was neither fussing or jumping around. We had eaten in the same café & just leaving. As for this not being a 'terrifying' incident I would ask the adult making that comment how they would feel if a Rottweiler jumped at them without warning for that is the equivalent in size ratio? The skin was not scratched but punctured by teeth marks he was screaming in shock. I can absolutely assure you he was 'terrified'! We have brought him up to love all animals but ask the owners permission before approaching any dog & I will continue to help him see that not all dogs are like that. Please believe me when I say our aim was not to sensationalise the incident but to ask for help in finding this irresponsible & arrogant woman. Sam Bellas[/p][/quote]My knowledge of the incident is from this report and the Sussex Police website. That is why I was able to state with accuracy that the incident was not reported upon it. The mother claims to have rung for medical attention for her son. Why weren't the police called at the same time, especially as the woman was walking off during the phone call? Even if it weren't a dog patrol the woman could have been detained at the scene. The Argus claims that the boy was walking past the cafe when the incident occurred. That doesn't tally with the mother's claim that she and her son had been in the cafe and were leaving. The mother also suggests that the dog in question was comparable in height to a rottweiler. This means that the terrier wouldn't have to 'jump up' in order to bite a child's thigh. The mother claims that the leg was punctured, which is a very serious injury as far as a dog-bite is concerned, but the police claim that the injury was 'slight'. One of them is wrong. I can fully understand the claim that the boy and his mother were terrified by what had happened. If the dog is as dangerous as suggested, we would have heard of other incidents. Finally, one writer on here hoped that the presence of a police dog would have shown how friendly most dogs are. I can confirm that a police dog would do the exact opposite - they are trained not to be nice. Let's hope the boy recovers asap.[/p][/quote]I am really concerned about your involvement in this case, you seem to have a very deep interest in' facts' that you know nothing about, but have no fear 'Stevo' I will happily dissect the points I have made so that is easier for you to understand. 1.The police were called in the 1st instance as the woman was so dismissive of my sons injury & refusing to give her details, they then sent the paramedics as my son is so young! 2. We were inside the café and came outside passing a row of tables in the street or you could say 'walking past the cafe' to which several people have given statements! 3. Please re-read my comment regarding the Rottweiler, I was pointing out the height - ratio for a child with a smaller dog to an adult with a larger dog I would have thought your attention to detail would have spotted that! 4. It was definitely a puncture wound & maybe not a serious wound but bad enough to hurt! Incidentally he was given antibiotics because this hideous woman did not hang around to give us any details about her or of the dogs history! 5. You seem to have the air of someone who is 'knowledgeable on all subjects but master of none', if you had ever spoke to a police dog handler they would tell you the same as they told my son, the dog will react only on the command given but are a wonderful example of good training & loyalty. My son met a huge police dog shortly after the incident & felt very safe in his company! I hope that this has cleared up any confusion over the incident & the article? However should you have any more time on your hands to debate the accuracy of reporting such stories I'm sure that Crime Stoppers would be interested in your assistance! Kind Regards The Mother Of A Little Boy Shocked Out Of His Skin![/p][/quote]I lean to believe the version of events given by you and the Police statements, rather than speculators and blinkered defenders of all dogs and dog-owners in this thread. I adore animals as much anyone else, but this owner seemingly didn't control her dog, and conveniently didn't hang around for the law to take a considered view. The Argus need to publish the her very clear photo (as per the other website). Hoping your son makes a full recovery soon. Just my view, but gently giving him contact with (stable) dogs sooner rather than later will temper any phobia building up. Withdean-er
  • Score: 1

11:20pm Tue 1 Jul 14

snowflakes26 says...

TheDrive wrote:
Someone should have given the dog a good hard kick.
I think this comment is disgusting it a dog who a animal no need to hard kick how you like it if someone done it to u I feel sorry for poor little boy but it not his thought it the owners and she should been aware to not take it in the sun they can turn anytime
[quote][p][bold]TheDrive[/bold] wrote: Someone should have given the dog a good hard kick.[/p][/quote]I think this comment is disgusting it a dog who a animal no need to hard kick how you like it if someone done it to u I feel sorry for poor little boy but it not his thought it the owners and she should been aware to not take it in the sun they can turn anytime snowflakes26
  • Score: 0

11:22pm Tue 1 Jul 14

stevo!! says...

"I am really concerned about your involvement in this case, you seem to have a very deep interest in' facts' that you know nothing about"

I've commented upon what has been reported by The Argus, the police.....and you.

If anyone has lied, that isn't my fault.

"The police were called in the 1st instance as the woman was so dismissive of my sons injury & refusing to give her details, they then sent the paramedics as my son is so young!"

So why didn't they turn up?

Isn't it just a case of them deducing that the incident was too trivial to attend? Di Lewis certainly thought so.

"2. We were inside the café and came outside passing a row of tables in the street or you could say 'walking past the cafe' to which several people have given statements!"

Twist that any way you like, but walking from a cafe you've just been using isn't 'walking past' it. The fact remains that The Argus and you differed.

"3. Please re-read my comment regarding the Rottweiler, I was pointing out the height - ratio for a child with a smaller dog to an adult with a larger dog"

I know. I've already pointed that out. A rottweiler would find an adult upper thigh at around its normal stance, so it wouldn't have to 'jump up' to bite it. The same occurred with the terrier, according to you.

"4. It was definitely a puncture wound & maybe not a serious wound but bad enough to hurt! Incidentally he was given antibiotics..."

A puncture wound from a dog usually requires a tetanus jab. Your boy was only given antibiotics. The paramedics made that judgement, and there is no suggestion that you insisted that they give a stronger medicine. The police also said the injury wasn't serious. So both the police and the medics played down the injury, and YOU accepted their decisions.

" My son met a huge police dog shortly after the incident & felt very safe in his company!"

So your boy wasn't terrified by the presence of another dog.

Phew!

"I hope that this has cleared up any confusion over the incident & the article"

The discrepancies and inaccuracies remain, but thanks anyway
"I am really concerned about your involvement in this case, you seem to have a very deep interest in' facts' that you know nothing about" I've commented upon what has been reported by The Argus, the police.....and you. If anyone has lied, that isn't my fault. "The police were called in the 1st instance as the woman was so dismissive of my sons injury & refusing to give her details, they then sent the paramedics as my son is so young!" So why didn't they turn up? Isn't it just a case of them deducing that the incident was too trivial to attend? Di Lewis certainly thought so. "2. We were inside the café and came outside passing a row of tables in the street or you could say 'walking past the cafe' to which several people have given statements!" Twist that any way you like, but walking from a cafe you've just been using isn't 'walking past' it. The fact remains that The Argus and you differed. "3. Please re-read my comment regarding the Rottweiler, I was pointing out the height - ratio for a child with a smaller dog to an adult with a larger dog" I know. I've already pointed that out. A rottweiler would find an adult upper thigh at around its normal stance, so it wouldn't have to 'jump up' to bite it. The same occurred with the terrier, according to you. "4. It was definitely a puncture wound & maybe not a serious wound but bad enough to hurt! Incidentally he was given antibiotics..." A puncture wound from a dog usually requires a tetanus jab. Your boy was only given antibiotics. The paramedics made that judgement, and there is no suggestion that you insisted that they give a stronger medicine. The police also said the injury wasn't serious. So both the police and the medics played down the injury, and YOU accepted their decisions. " My son met a huge police dog shortly after the incident & felt very safe in his company!" So your boy wasn't terrified by the presence of another dog. Phew! "I hope that this has cleared up any confusion over the incident & the article" The discrepancies and inaccuracies remain, but thanks anyway stevo!!
  • Score: -3

6:33am Wed 2 Jul 14

alyn, southwick says...

stevo!! wrote:
"I am really concerned about your involvement in this case, you seem to have a very deep interest in' facts' that you know nothing about"

I've commented upon what has been reported by The Argus, the police.....and you.

If anyone has lied, that isn't my fault.

"The police were called in the 1st instance as the woman was so dismissive of my sons injury & refusing to give her details, they then sent the paramedics as my son is so young!"

So why didn't they turn up?

Isn't it just a case of them deducing that the incident was too trivial to attend? Di Lewis certainly thought so.

"2. We were inside the café and came outside passing a row of tables in the street or you could say 'walking past the cafe' to which several people have given statements!"

Twist that any way you like, but walking from a cafe you've just been using isn't 'walking past' it. The fact remains that The Argus and you differed.

"3. Please re-read my comment regarding the Rottweiler, I was pointing out the height - ratio for a child with a smaller dog to an adult with a larger dog"

I know. I've already pointed that out. A rottweiler would find an adult upper thigh at around its normal stance, so it wouldn't have to 'jump up' to bite it. The same occurred with the terrier, according to you.

"4. It was definitely a puncture wound & maybe not a serious wound but bad enough to hurt! Incidentally he was given antibiotics..."

A puncture wound from a dog usually requires a tetanus jab. Your boy was only given antibiotics. The paramedics made that judgement, and there is no suggestion that you insisted that they give a stronger medicine. The police also said the injury wasn't serious. So both the police and the medics played down the injury, and YOU accepted their decisions.

" My son met a huge police dog shortly after the incident & felt very safe in his company!"

So your boy wasn't terrified by the presence of another dog.

Phew!

"I hope that this has cleared up any confusion over the incident & the article"

The discrepancies and inaccuracies remain, but thanks anyway
I see no discrepancies, only someone trying to twist the events to match their preconceived notions.
Might be easier just to shut up rather than dig a deeper hole.
[quote][p][bold]stevo!![/bold] wrote: "I am really concerned about your involvement in this case, you seem to have a very deep interest in' facts' that you know nothing about" I've commented upon what has been reported by The Argus, the police.....and you. If anyone has lied, that isn't my fault. "The police were called in the 1st instance as the woman was so dismissive of my sons injury & refusing to give her details, they then sent the paramedics as my son is so young!" So why didn't they turn up? Isn't it just a case of them deducing that the incident was too trivial to attend? Di Lewis certainly thought so. "2. We were inside the café and came outside passing a row of tables in the street or you could say 'walking past the cafe' to which several people have given statements!" Twist that any way you like, but walking from a cafe you've just been using isn't 'walking past' it. The fact remains that The Argus and you differed. "3. Please re-read my comment regarding the Rottweiler, I was pointing out the height - ratio for a child with a smaller dog to an adult with a larger dog" I know. I've already pointed that out. A rottweiler would find an adult upper thigh at around its normal stance, so it wouldn't have to 'jump up' to bite it. The same occurred with the terrier, according to you. "4. It was definitely a puncture wound & maybe not a serious wound but bad enough to hurt! Incidentally he was given antibiotics..." A puncture wound from a dog usually requires a tetanus jab. Your boy was only given antibiotics. The paramedics made that judgement, and there is no suggestion that you insisted that they give a stronger medicine. The police also said the injury wasn't serious. So both the police and the medics played down the injury, and YOU accepted their decisions. " My son met a huge police dog shortly after the incident & felt very safe in his company!" So your boy wasn't terrified by the presence of another dog. Phew! "I hope that this has cleared up any confusion over the incident & the article" The discrepancies and inaccuracies remain, but thanks anyway[/p][/quote]I see no discrepancies, only someone trying to twist the events to match their preconceived notions. Might be easier just to shut up rather than dig a deeper hole. alyn, southwick
  • Score: -1

9:07am Wed 2 Jul 14

Juleyanne says...

Man of Steel is wrong. Are you suggesting that every previously good natured domestic animal who might have reacted through fear or discomfort be put to sleep? If that is the case, this would condemn to death every cat that scratches, dog that nips, bee that stings, horse that bites or kicks out in fear! Does your draconian rulings extend to human acts of aggression through defence or fear or is this confined purely to animals?
Man of Steel is wrong. Are you suggesting that every previously good natured domestic animal who might have reacted through fear or discomfort be put to sleep? If that is the case, this would condemn to death every cat that scratches, dog that nips, bee that stings, horse that bites or kicks out in fear! Does your draconian rulings extend to human acts of aggression through defence or fear or is this confined purely to animals? Juleyanne
  • Score: 7

9:24am Wed 2 Jul 14

BellasWay says...

stevo!! wrote:
"I am really concerned about your involvement in this case, you seem to have a very deep interest in' facts' that you know nothing about"

I've commented upon what has been reported by The Argus, the police.....and you.

If anyone has lied, that isn't my fault.

"The police were called in the 1st instance as the woman was so dismissive of my sons injury & refusing to give her details, they then sent the paramedics as my son is so young!"

So why didn't they turn up?

Isn't it just a case of them deducing that the incident was too trivial to attend? Di Lewis certainly thought so.

"2. We were inside the café and came outside passing a row of tables in the street or you could say 'walking past the cafe' to which several people have given statements!"

Twist that any way you like, but walking from a cafe you've just been using isn't 'walking past' it. The fact remains that The Argus and you differed.

"3. Please re-read my comment regarding the Rottweiler, I was pointing out the height - ratio for a child with a smaller dog to an adult with a larger dog"

I know. I've already pointed that out. A rottweiler would find an adult upper thigh at around its normal stance, so it wouldn't have to 'jump up' to bite it. The same occurred with the terrier, according to you.

"4. It was definitely a puncture wound & maybe not a serious wound but bad enough to hurt! Incidentally he was given antibiotics..."

A puncture wound from a dog usually requires a tetanus jab. Your boy was only given antibiotics. The paramedics made that judgement, and there is no suggestion that you insisted that they give a stronger medicine. The police also said the injury wasn't serious. So both the police and the medics played down the injury, and YOU accepted their decisions.

" My son met a huge police dog shortly after the incident & felt very safe in his company!"

So your boy wasn't terrified by the presence of another dog.

Phew!

"I hope that this has cleared up any confusion over the incident & the article"

The discrepancies and inaccuracies remain, but thanks anyway
Are you actually insane? I will respond to this then I hope you crawl back into your very sad little world and stop bothering innocent people trying to get some justice! The Police did come & are treating this incident seriously hence the article but this cowardly woman made sure she was gone before they arrived. My son is up to date with his tetanus jabs so they do not give a second one! If you think its so important whether we were walking past the café or not please feel free to visit the premises where you will see the set up.
I'm typing this & wondering who you are that I have to explain myself to? I will now save my energy for tracking down this dreadful woman who I'm now starting to think could actually be you!!!!
[quote][p][bold]stevo!![/bold] wrote: "I am really concerned about your involvement in this case, you seem to have a very deep interest in' facts' that you know nothing about" I've commented upon what has been reported by The Argus, the police.....and you. If anyone has lied, that isn't my fault. "The police were called in the 1st instance as the woman was so dismissive of my sons injury & refusing to give her details, they then sent the paramedics as my son is so young!" So why didn't they turn up? Isn't it just a case of them deducing that the incident was too trivial to attend? Di Lewis certainly thought so. "2. We were inside the café and came outside passing a row of tables in the street or you could say 'walking past the cafe' to which several people have given statements!" Twist that any way you like, but walking from a cafe you've just been using isn't 'walking past' it. The fact remains that The Argus and you differed. "3. Please re-read my comment regarding the Rottweiler, I was pointing out the height - ratio for a child with a smaller dog to an adult with a larger dog" I know. I've already pointed that out. A rottweiler would find an adult upper thigh at around its normal stance, so it wouldn't have to 'jump up' to bite it. The same occurred with the terrier, according to you. "4. It was definitely a puncture wound & maybe not a serious wound but bad enough to hurt! Incidentally he was given antibiotics..." A puncture wound from a dog usually requires a tetanus jab. Your boy was only given antibiotics. The paramedics made that judgement, and there is no suggestion that you insisted that they give a stronger medicine. The police also said the injury wasn't serious. So both the police and the medics played down the injury, and YOU accepted their decisions. " My son met a huge police dog shortly after the incident & felt very safe in his company!" So your boy wasn't terrified by the presence of another dog. Phew! "I hope that this has cleared up any confusion over the incident & the article" The discrepancies and inaccuracies remain, but thanks anyway[/p][/quote]Are you actually insane? I will respond to this then I hope you crawl back into your very sad little world and stop bothering innocent people trying to get some justice! The Police did come & are treating this incident seriously hence the article but this cowardly woman made sure she was gone before they arrived. My son is up to date with his tetanus jabs so they do not give a second one! If you think its so important whether we were walking past the café or not please feel free to visit the premises where you will see the set up. I'm typing this & wondering who you are that I have to explain myself to? I will now save my energy for tracking down this dreadful woman who I'm now starting to think could actually be you!!!! BellasWay
  • Score: 1

9:30am Wed 2 Jul 14

Vox populi 2 says...

STEVO wins debate by a distance.
STEVO wins debate by a distance. Vox populi 2
  • Score: -3

9:36am Wed 2 Jul 14

FC says...

BellasWay wrote:
stevo!! wrote:
"I am really concerned about your involvement in this case, you seem to have a very deep interest in' facts' that you know nothing about"

I've commented upon what has been reported by The Argus, the police.....and you.

If anyone has lied, that isn't my fault.

"The police were called in the 1st instance as the woman was so dismissive of my sons injury & refusing to give her details, they then sent the paramedics as my son is so young!"

So why didn't they turn up?

Isn't it just a case of them deducing that the incident was too trivial to attend? Di Lewis certainly thought so.

"2. We were inside the café and came outside passing a row of tables in the street or you could say 'walking past the cafe' to which several people have given statements!"

Twist that any way you like, but walking from a cafe you've just been using isn't 'walking past' it. The fact remains that The Argus and you differed.

"3. Please re-read my comment regarding the Rottweiler, I was pointing out the height - ratio for a child with a smaller dog to an adult with a larger dog"

I know. I've already pointed that out. A rottweiler would find an adult upper thigh at around its normal stance, so it wouldn't have to 'jump up' to bite it. The same occurred with the terrier, according to you.

"4. It was definitely a puncture wound & maybe not a serious wound but bad enough to hurt! Incidentally he was given antibiotics..."

A puncture wound from a dog usually requires a tetanus jab. Your boy was only given antibiotics. The paramedics made that judgement, and there is no suggestion that you insisted that they give a stronger medicine. The police also said the injury wasn't serious. So both the police and the medics played down the injury, and YOU accepted their decisions.

" My son met a huge police dog shortly after the incident & felt very safe in his company!"

So your boy wasn't terrified by the presence of another dog.

Phew!

"I hope that this has cleared up any confusion over the incident & the article"

The discrepancies and inaccuracies remain, but thanks anyway
Are you actually insane? I will respond to this then I hope you crawl back into your very sad little world and stop bothering innocent people trying to get some justice! The Police did come & are treating this incident seriously hence the article but this cowardly woman made sure she was gone before they arrived. My son is up to date with his tetanus jabs so they do not give a second one! If you think its so important whether we were walking past the café or not please feel free to visit the premises where you will see the set up.
I'm typing this & wondering who you are that I have to explain myself to? I will now save my energy for tracking down this dreadful woman who I'm now starting to think could actually be you!!!!
It's not his fault the stories and report don't add up.

"Skin punctured by teeth" does not correlate with that of the police report.

So which is it? Why hasn't the Argus posted a picture of this injury (like they usually do)? Where's his bandage in the photo?

The article says one thing, you say another and the police quote suggests something else.

So... which is it? I'd imagine that woman goes to the cafe regularly (they all do on George Street) so why hasn't she been arrested? Why is her dog not locked up in a high security doggy prison; life with no parole? Oh, probably because you're an overreacting mother.
[quote][p][bold]BellasWay[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]stevo!![/bold] wrote: "I am really concerned about your involvement in this case, you seem to have a very deep interest in' facts' that you know nothing about" I've commented upon what has been reported by The Argus, the police.....and you. If anyone has lied, that isn't my fault. "The police were called in the 1st instance as the woman was so dismissive of my sons injury & refusing to give her details, they then sent the paramedics as my son is so young!" So why didn't they turn up? Isn't it just a case of them deducing that the incident was too trivial to attend? Di Lewis certainly thought so. "2. We were inside the café and came outside passing a row of tables in the street or you could say 'walking past the cafe' to which several people have given statements!" Twist that any way you like, but walking from a cafe you've just been using isn't 'walking past' it. The fact remains that The Argus and you differed. "3. Please re-read my comment regarding the Rottweiler, I was pointing out the height - ratio for a child with a smaller dog to an adult with a larger dog" I know. I've already pointed that out. A rottweiler would find an adult upper thigh at around its normal stance, so it wouldn't have to 'jump up' to bite it. The same occurred with the terrier, according to you. "4. It was definitely a puncture wound & maybe not a serious wound but bad enough to hurt! Incidentally he was given antibiotics..." A puncture wound from a dog usually requires a tetanus jab. Your boy was only given antibiotics. The paramedics made that judgement, and there is no suggestion that you insisted that they give a stronger medicine. The police also said the injury wasn't serious. So both the police and the medics played down the injury, and YOU accepted their decisions. " My son met a huge police dog shortly after the incident & felt very safe in his company!" So your boy wasn't terrified by the presence of another dog. Phew! "I hope that this has cleared up any confusion over the incident & the article" The discrepancies and inaccuracies remain, but thanks anyway[/p][/quote]Are you actually insane? I will respond to this then I hope you crawl back into your very sad little world and stop bothering innocent people trying to get some justice! The Police did come & are treating this incident seriously hence the article but this cowardly woman made sure she was gone before they arrived. My son is up to date with his tetanus jabs so they do not give a second one! If you think its so important whether we were walking past the café or not please feel free to visit the premises where you will see the set up. I'm typing this & wondering who you are that I have to explain myself to? I will now save my energy for tracking down this dreadful woman who I'm now starting to think could actually be you!!!![/p][/quote]It's not his fault the stories and report don't add up. "Skin punctured by teeth" does not correlate with that of the police report. So which is it? Why hasn't the Argus posted a picture of this injury (like they usually do)? Where's his bandage in the photo? The article says one thing, you say another and the police quote suggests something else. So... which is it? I'd imagine that woman goes to the cafe regularly (they all do on George Street) so why hasn't she been arrested? Why is her dog not locked up in a high security doggy prison; life with no parole? Oh, probably because you're an overreacting mother. FC
  • Score: 2

9:57am Wed 2 Jul 14

wippasnapper says...

It should be made a legal requirement that ALL DOGS going into Towns and City’s have to wear a Mussel i.e. making it impossible for them to bight anyone secondly if you knowingly know your dog is a snapper use your common sense if you have any to put a Mussel on them because if you dote you are an irresponsible dog owner.
It should be made a legal requirement that ALL DOGS going into Towns and City’s have to wear a Mussel i.e. making it impossible for them to bight anyone secondly if you knowingly know your dog is a snapper use your common sense if you have any to put a Mussel on them because if you dote you are an irresponsible dog owner. wippasnapper
  • Score: -1

9:58am Wed 2 Jul 14

Spooky Sue says...

I have sympathy for all involved as this can be quite scary for a child, but I think the term "terrifying " more akin to perhaps an attack where the dog is more out of control and has more than one go, and surely if it had been that bad an attack somebody might have tried to stop the woman leaving.
Anyway yesterday my 19 year old daughters boyfriend was near Worthing College and was attacked by a lone dog with no lead or collar on and no owner in sight, he sustained a nasty bite to his leg requiring hospital treatment and has a very sore leg he can barely move, and being an ice skater it could jeopardise his future career. The college are aware what happened as are the local dog wardens who went looking for the animal and oh the police they said they will take a statement from him on FRIDAY!!! guess the police in Brighton have nothing better to do.
I have sympathy for all involved as this can be quite scary for a child, but I think the term "terrifying " more akin to perhaps an attack where the dog is more out of control and has more than one go, and surely if it had been that bad an attack somebody might have tried to stop the woman leaving. Anyway yesterday my 19 year old daughters boyfriend was near Worthing College and was attacked by a lone dog with no lead or collar on and no owner in sight, he sustained a nasty bite to his leg requiring hospital treatment and has a very sore leg he can barely move, and being an ice skater it could jeopardise his future career. The college are aware what happened as are the local dog wardens who went looking for the animal and oh the police they said they will take a statement from him on FRIDAY!!! guess the police in Brighton have nothing better to do. Spooky Sue
  • Score: 0

8:04pm Wed 2 Jul 14

Withdean-er says...

Spooky Sue wrote:
I have sympathy for all involved as this can be quite scary for a child, but I think the term "terrifying " more akin to perhaps an attack where the dog is more out of control and has more than one go, and surely if it had been that bad an attack somebody might have tried to stop the woman leaving.
Anyway yesterday my 19 year old daughters boyfriend was near Worthing College and was attacked by a lone dog with no lead or collar on and no owner in sight, he sustained a nasty bite to his leg requiring hospital treatment and has a very sore leg he can barely move, and being an ice skater it could jeopardise his future career. The college are aware what happened as are the local dog wardens who went looking for the animal and oh the police they said they will take a statement from him on FRIDAY!!! guess the police in Brighton have nothing better to do.
Or the Police in zzzzzzzz yawn-ville Worthing are as slow as its residents.
[quote][p][bold]Spooky Sue[/bold] wrote: I have sympathy for all involved as this can be quite scary for a child, but I think the term "terrifying " more akin to perhaps an attack where the dog is more out of control and has more than one go, and surely if it had been that bad an attack somebody might have tried to stop the woman leaving. Anyway yesterday my 19 year old daughters boyfriend was near Worthing College and was attacked by a lone dog with no lead or collar on and no owner in sight, he sustained a nasty bite to his leg requiring hospital treatment and has a very sore leg he can barely move, and being an ice skater it could jeopardise his future career. The college are aware what happened as are the local dog wardens who went looking for the animal and oh the police they said they will take a statement from him on FRIDAY!!! guess the police in Brighton have nothing better to do.[/p][/quote]Or the Police in zzzzzzzz yawn-ville Worthing are as slow as its residents. Withdean-er
  • Score: 0

9:34pm Wed 2 Jul 14

stevo!! says...

"I see no discrepancies, only someone trying to twist the events to match their preconceived notions."

How can events be twisted??

You've been told two discrepancies:

1) The description of the wound

2) The path taken by the mother and son.

Whichever comments are accurate is irrelevant. I have no bone to pick with the mother or The Argus, but one of them is wrong on two matters.
"I see no discrepancies, only someone trying to twist the events to match their preconceived notions." How can events be twisted?? You've been told two discrepancies: 1) The description of the wound 2) The path taken by the mother and son. Whichever comments are accurate is irrelevant. I have no bone to pick with the mother or The Argus, but one of them is wrong on two matters. stevo!!
  • Score: 0
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