The ArgusPostmen and women attacked by dogs in Sussex (From The Argus)

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Dogs attack 43 Sussex posties

The Argus: Postmen and women attacked by dogs in Sussex Postmen and women attacked by dogs in Sussex

More than 40 postmen and women were attacked by dogs while delivering mail in Sussex last year.

The 43 workers from Littlehampton to Pevensey were among the 3,300 victims across the country.

The number of those attacked between April 2013 and March this year has increased by eight per cent nationally, to an average of nine attacks a day.

But in Sussex the number of attacks are bucking the national trend, decreasing by 17 per cent on last year.

The figures have been released as part of Dog Awareness Week, run by the Royal Mail, to raise awareness of attacks on postmen and women, who are the largest group of dog attack victims in the UK.

Mark Cremer, 49, has worked for Royal Mail in Lancing for 12 and a half years and has been bitten six times.

The last incident was 18 months ago in Bristol Avenue, Lancing, when he was bitten on his finger as he was posting through the letter box.

Mr Cremer said: “It’s always been a source of humour, postmen being bitten by dogs.

“Owners actually laugh while you are being bitten.

“The basic attitude needs to change. It is not something to laugh at. People get seriously hurt.”

The injury is still affecting Mr Cremer, who may need minor surgery.

Other incidents include a postman in Polegate who was bitten by a dog as he walked away from a property he had just delivered to and a postman in Hove who injured his back after he fell over while trying to get away from a dog that was running towards him.

Chas Basra, Royal Mail’s delivery director for Brighton, said: “We know that most dogs are not inherently dangerous. However, even the most placid animal can be prone to attack if it feels that its territory is being threatened.

“We appeal to dog owners in the BN postcode area to keep their pets under control, especially if they know their pets have a territorial nature.”

Tougher penalties mean dog owners can now face a prison sentence of 14 years for a fatal attack and five years for allowing a dog to cause injury, an increase from two years previously.

Comments (7)

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10:30am Wed 2 Jul 14

Euly says...

Believe it or not we used to have a postman at our old house who used to try and wind up our Labrador. He used to stick two fingers up at her and tell her to F**k off. She is the mildest mannered dog you could ever meet. Luckily the postmen in East Saltdean are lovely unlike the idiot in West Saltdean
Believe it or not we used to have a postman at our old house who used to try and wind up our Labrador. He used to stick two fingers up at her and tell her to F**k off. She is the mildest mannered dog you could ever meet. Luckily the postmen in East Saltdean are lovely unlike the idiot in West Saltdean Euly
  • Score: -1

10:30am Wed 2 Jul 14

Frank28 says...

The Dangerous Dogs Act was amended recently, to protect people like Postmen. All dog owners should make themselves aware of this law. If Postmen feel threatened, then they should not deliver any mail to that address.
The Dangerous Dogs Act was amended recently, to protect people like Postmen. All dog owners should make themselves aware of this law. If Postmen feel threatened, then they should not deliver any mail to that address. Frank28
  • Score: 3

10:37am Wed 2 Jul 14

Andy R says...

"stevo" will be on here shortly - blaming the posties.......
"stevo" will be on here shortly - blaming the posties....... Andy R
  • Score: -2

10:43am Wed 2 Jul 14

Juleyanne says...

The postman and dog debate rumbles on through the years. I am afraid risks with certain jobs go hand in hand. I am sure the RSPCA, Police and parcel delivery staff etc face similar issues. I absolutely agree dog owners have a duty to keep their pets under control, but as with many professions, it is unrealistic to rule out all risk. If a postman dislikes or fears his customers dogs, perhaps he or she is in the wrong job, as dogs sense fear and in a few nervous/territorial dogs, it is likely to increase the odds of negative behaviour. Perhaps, all postmen and women should undergo basic dog behaviour/handling training before becoming fully fledged postal workers. However, I reiterate, it is of course the owners responsibility to ensure safe entry and exit for all postman and delivery workers at all times.
The postman and dog debate rumbles on through the years. I am afraid risks with certain jobs go hand in hand. I am sure the RSPCA, Police and parcel delivery staff etc face similar issues. I absolutely agree dog owners have a duty to keep their pets under control, but as with many professions, it is unrealistic to rule out all risk. If a postman dislikes or fears his customers dogs, perhaps he or she is in the wrong job, as dogs sense fear and in a few nervous/territorial dogs, it is likely to increase the odds of negative behaviour. Perhaps, all postmen and women should undergo basic dog behaviour/handling training before becoming fully fledged postal workers. However, I reiterate, it is of course the owners responsibility to ensure safe entry and exit for all postman and delivery workers at all times. Juleyanne
  • Score: 1

10:52am Wed 2 Jul 14

Andy R says...

Juleyanne wrote:
The postman and dog debate rumbles on through the years. I am afraid risks with certain jobs go hand in hand. I am sure the RSPCA, Police and parcel delivery staff etc face similar issues. I absolutely agree dog owners have a duty to keep their pets under control, but as with many professions, it is unrealistic to rule out all risk. If a postman dislikes or fears his customers dogs, perhaps he or she is in the wrong job, as dogs sense fear and in a few nervous/territorial dogs, it is likely to increase the odds of negative behaviour. Perhaps, all postmen and women should undergo basic dog behaviour/handling training before becoming fully fledged postal workers. However, I reiterate, it is of course the owners responsibility to ensure safe entry and exit for all postman and delivery workers at all times.
Sorry, but hazards at work should NOT be treated as "just one of those things". Risks should be controlled if they cannot be eliminated altogether.
[quote][p][bold]Juleyanne[/bold] wrote: The postman and dog debate rumbles on through the years. I am afraid risks with certain jobs go hand in hand. I am sure the RSPCA, Police and parcel delivery staff etc face similar issues. I absolutely agree dog owners have a duty to keep their pets under control, but as with many professions, it is unrealistic to rule out all risk. If a postman dislikes or fears his customers dogs, perhaps he or she is in the wrong job, as dogs sense fear and in a few nervous/territorial dogs, it is likely to increase the odds of negative behaviour. Perhaps, all postmen and women should undergo basic dog behaviour/handling training before becoming fully fledged postal workers. However, I reiterate, it is of course the owners responsibility to ensure safe entry and exit for all postman and delivery workers at all times.[/p][/quote]Sorry, but hazards at work should NOT be treated as "just one of those things". Risks should be controlled if they cannot be eliminated altogether. Andy R
  • Score: 1

11:03am Wed 2 Jul 14

Nosfaratu says...

Andy R wrote:
Juleyanne wrote:
The postman and dog debate rumbles on through the years. I am afraid risks with certain jobs go hand in hand. I am sure the RSPCA, Police and parcel delivery staff etc face similar issues. I absolutely agree dog owners have a duty to keep their pets under control, but as with many professions, it is unrealistic to rule out all risk. If a postman dislikes or fears his customers dogs, perhaps he or she is in the wrong job, as dogs sense fear and in a few nervous/territorial dogs, it is likely to increase the odds of negative behaviour. Perhaps, all postmen and women should undergo basic dog behaviour/handling training before becoming fully fledged postal workers. However, I reiterate, it is of course the owners responsibility to ensure safe entry and exit for all postman and delivery workers at all times.
Sorry, but hazards at work should NOT be treated as "just one of those things". Risks should be controlled if they cannot be eliminated altogether.
This is what happens when dog ownership becomes out of Govt control.

Bring back the licence and make it £200 a year. This will eliminate the owners who don't really care, the backstreet breeders who should also have an extra licence at £1000 and the dangerous ones.
[quote][p][bold]Andy R[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Juleyanne[/bold] wrote: The postman and dog debate rumbles on through the years. I am afraid risks with certain jobs go hand in hand. I am sure the RSPCA, Police and parcel delivery staff etc face similar issues. I absolutely agree dog owners have a duty to keep their pets under control, but as with many professions, it is unrealistic to rule out all risk. If a postman dislikes or fears his customers dogs, perhaps he or she is in the wrong job, as dogs sense fear and in a few nervous/territorial dogs, it is likely to increase the odds of negative behaviour. Perhaps, all postmen and women should undergo basic dog behaviour/handling training before becoming fully fledged postal workers. However, I reiterate, it is of course the owners responsibility to ensure safe entry and exit for all postman and delivery workers at all times.[/p][/quote]Sorry, but hazards at work should NOT be treated as "just one of those things". Risks should be controlled if they cannot be eliminated altogether.[/p][/quote]This is what happens when dog ownership becomes out of Govt control. Bring back the licence and make it £200 a year. This will eliminate the owners who don't really care, the backstreet breeders who should also have an extra licence at £1000 and the dangerous ones. Nosfaratu
  • Score: 0

11:09am Wed 2 Jul 14

stevo!! says...

Frank28 wrote:
The Dangerous Dogs Act was amended recently, to protect people like Postmen. All dog owners should make themselves aware of this law. If Postmen feel threatened, then they should not deliver any mail to that address.
My Dad was a gas meter reader, and the instruction was that if he was ever in danger from anything, he was to continue on his way and cite the reason for doing so. That reason would later appear on the reading card produced for the next time the meter was due to be read. Meter readers would be perfectly within their right not to ever attempt entering that property. Subsequent readings would take place under appointment where the obstruction (usually a dog) would have to be made safe before entry.

I see nothing wrong in the Royal Mail making these dog owners collect their mail following an attack for which the owner is clearly responsible.
[quote][p][bold]Frank28[/bold] wrote: The Dangerous Dogs Act was amended recently, to protect people like Postmen. All dog owners should make themselves aware of this law. If Postmen feel threatened, then they should not deliver any mail to that address.[/p][/quote]My Dad was a gas meter reader, and the instruction was that if he was ever in danger from anything, he was to continue on his way and cite the reason for doing so. That reason would later appear on the reading card produced for the next time the meter was due to be read. Meter readers would be perfectly within their right not to ever attempt entering that property. Subsequent readings would take place under appointment where the obstruction (usually a dog) would have to be made safe before entry. I see nothing wrong in the Royal Mail making these dog owners collect their mail following an attack for which the owner is clearly responsible. stevo!!
  • Score: 1
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