Mutant rats are taking over Ashdown Forest

Ashdown Forest, which inspired A.A Milne’s One Hundred Acre Wood from the Winnie The Pooh tales

Ashdown Forest, which inspired A.A Milne’s One Hundred Acre Wood from the Winnie The Pooh tales

First published in News
Last updated
by , Reporter

A FOREST that served as the inspiration for Winnie-The-Pooh is now being plagued by a “time-bomb” of poison resistant super rats.

Researchers from the University of Huddersfield claim up to 75% of rats in the 2,500 hectare Ashdown Forest are now resistant to most conventional deterrents.

The report states the rats pose a threat to wildlife in the Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty and that recent generations are becoming immune to conventional poisons.

Dr Dougie Clarke who conducted the research warned that stronger poisons need to be put in use in order to stem the tide of the rats.

He told a national newspaper: “I think people should be concerned about these resistant rats because of public health concerns - they carry disease and various other bacteria and viruses and they also damage buildings.

“They cost billions of pounds of damage worldwide.“The seven-year study using rats gathered from all over the country discovered a worrying spread of poison-immune super rats.”

He added: “With the use of rodenticides, that will kill off the normal rats, and then the resistant ones will remain.

“So it’s a sort of time bomb of resistance building up over generations of rats. Unless there’s new legislation for the more toxic poisons and maybe for the more lax use of them, then it will have to be the more physical forms of killing the rats, like rat traps etc, and therefore the costs are going to escalate because of the monitoring and the picking off of the rats, and the dead bodies.”

A spokesman for Ashdown Forest argued the report was not as bad as it sounded.

She said: “The report was not done in conjunction with us and rangers have not seen any of these “super rats” in the forest – while the study itself may be correct it has been reported in a somewhat hysterical manner.”

Comments (8)

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5:55am Tue 8 Jul 14

lindaf says...

She said: “The report was not done in conjunction with us and rangers have not seen any of these “super rats” in the forest – while the study itself may be correct it has been reported in a somewhat hysterical manner.”

Maybe the writer should work for The Argus....
She said: “The report was not done in conjunction with us and rangers have not seen any of these “super rats” in the forest – while the study itself may be correct it has been reported in a somewhat hysterical manner.” Maybe the writer should work for The Argus.... lindaf
  • Score: 2

6:19am Tue 8 Jul 14

We love Red Billy says...

Clever these mutant rats. They have learnt to wear clothes, walk on two legs anf adopt human names like Jason, Phelim, Ian, Pete and Caroline.They are starting to desert the city and will heve left completely by next May. #politicalchamberpot
s.
Clever these mutant rats. They have learnt to wear clothes, walk on two legs anf adopt human names like Jason, Phelim, Ian, Pete and Caroline.They are starting to desert the city and will heve left completely by next May. #politicalchamberpot s. We love Red Billy
  • Score: 0

8:19am Tue 8 Jul 14

PeacehavenPaul says...

"Ashdown Forset"?? Are these stories not proofread before publication?
"Ashdown Forset"?? Are these stories not proofread before publication? PeacehavenPaul
  • Score: 6

8:45am Tue 8 Jul 14

rolivan says...

Another brilliant Headline from those at the Argus. I am beginning to think this is some sort of Competition amongst the "journalists"
Another brilliant Headline from those at the Argus. I am beginning to think this is some sort of Competition amongst the "journalists" rolivan
  • Score: 5

10:00am Tue 8 Jul 14

spa301 says...

Why are researchers from Huddersfield studying rats in Ashdown forest and then not even including the rangers that actually work there? It's about 240 miles from Huddersfield so presumably the number of visits entailing a 480+ mile round trip must be limited. Unless they have excessive sums to spend and thought this was a great way to spend it?
Are there no rats in their neighbourhood worth studying at much less cost?
Why are researchers from Huddersfield studying rats in Ashdown forest and then not even including the rangers that actually work there? It's about 240 miles from Huddersfield so presumably the number of visits entailing a 480+ mile round trip must be limited. Unless they have excessive sums to spend and thought this was a great way to spend it? Are there no rats in their neighbourhood worth studying at much less cost? spa301
  • Score: 5

10:21am Tue 8 Jul 14

GreggWallace says...

The best one was yesterday,. Tim Ridgway's column with "right off" instead of "write off" in the headline. Classic Evening Arségus.
The best one was yesterday,. Tim Ridgway's column with "right off" instead of "write off" in the headline. Classic Evening Arségus. GreggWallace
  • Score: 1

11:16am Tue 8 Jul 14

stevo!! says...

The Argus should employ poof-readers.
The Argus should employ poof-readers. stevo!!
  • Score: 0

1:39pm Tue 8 Jul 14

notaconspiracy says...

If only we had a big cat nearby. Oh, wait.....
If only we had a big cat nearby. Oh, wait..... notaconspiracy
  • Score: 1

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