Potential waste processing sites revealed

A map of the potential sites

North Quay, Newhaven

Hoyle Road, Peacehaven

Potential waste processing sites revealed

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Every year 1.7 million tons of rubbish is handled in East Sussex and Brighton and Hove.

ADRIAN IMMS reports on the new sites being proposed to deal with shifting it all.

While councils have made giant leaps in recycling, compacting and burning waste the issue of how to treat it becomes more pressing every year.

A consultation has now been launched on how and where the rubbish we produce will be processed over the next 20 years and beyond.

The project – called the Waste and Minerals Sites Plan – aims to virtually eradicate landfill waste by 2026.

For residents, this potentially means a new compactor, crusher or sorting plant springing up on a plot of land near to them.

In Brighton and Hove alone, the earmarked sites are a coal yard in Sackville Road, the gas towers near Brighton Marina and the bin lorry depot next to the current Waste Transfer Station in Hollingdean.

Elsewhere, at Newhaven’s north quay nearly 18 hectares has been included in the consultation as well as land west of Uckfield which is about half the size of Regents Park in London.

Any sites eventually selected would see waste arriving, being processed and then taken away for re-use.

But the authorities say there is no need to panic.

The South Downs National Park Authority (SDNPA) has worked closely with East Sussex County Council (ESCC) and Brighton and Hove City Council (BHCC) to establish the need for minerals and waste sites across the county.

The SDNPA’s main concern is making sure new major waste sites are away from sensitive areas. It is for this reason none are proposed for within the South Downs National Park.

A total of twenty sites have been chosen as options, with the authorities keen to stress that no decisions have been taken.

Furthermore, there are no cash figures for creating these sites.

Household waste, including recycling and food waste, accounts for 21% of the total, with another 27% from commercial and industrial sources while the majority, 51%, is the rubbish from demolition and construction work.

The figures are based on weight and this is why bricks and rubble come on top of the list.

These potential sites, set out on the map here, have not been identified for any specific waste use as such – the precise nature of the uses depends on future waste needs.

The new plans identify further potential recycling and recovery sites to meet the need for increased waste treatment capacity.

The last landfill site in East Sussex, at Pebsham, closed in November last year and only a relatively small amount of material is now sent to landfill sites out of the county.

The sites identified, none of which would be used for landfill, include specific waste sites and new development areas which could accommodate recycling and recovery facilities.

At a meeting on Tuesday, June 3, ESCC’s cabinet approved, subject to endorsement by BHCC and the SDNPA, publication of the draft plan for a nine-week consultation, which is currently underway.

An ESCC spokesman said: “This document is about future planning of where additional facilities could be located and just because a site is listed as being suitable for a recycling or recovery site doesn’t necessarily mean it will be used for that purpose.

“In East Sussex and Brighton and Hove, we have already made huge strides in encouraging more people to recycle, but to enable us to achieve the high targets we’ve set for ourselves, we need more recycling and recovery sites.

The three authorities have identified a gap for waste management facilities equivalent to about five major sites or 15 smaller sites.

Even if some sites, such as the land west of Uckfield at 81 hectares, have vast land areas, this doesn’t mean all of it will be used.

A major site would be something like the Hollingdean site, which sorts a lot of Brighton and Hove’s waste.

Geoff Raw, Brighton and Hove City Council executive director for environment, development and housing, said: “Waste management is an area where technology is improving all the time and where waste facilities are required this is helping to hugely reduce the impact on sites and surrounding areas.

“In Brighton and Hove, three of these – Hangleton Bottom, Sackville Coal Yard and Hollingdean industrial estate – are already allocated for waste management use in the 2006 Waste Local Plan.

“The fourth, the former gasworks on Roedean Road, has been included because it is on an industrial site.”

Councillor Lizzie Deane, deputy chair of Brighton and Hove’s environment committee, said: “We have made great progress in reducing the amount of household waste sent to landfill and are committed to supporting both residents and businesses to recycle more and reduce the waste produced. However we still need to plan for the new facilities needed to achieve high recycling and recovery targets and virtually eliminate landfill for both household and commercial waste.”

The consultation process on these potential sites runs until September 5.

Waste not, want not

THE long-term aim for local authorities is to reduce the amount that people throw away.

Brighton and Hove residents throw away 39,000 tons of food every year – about 260kg per household.

According to the Brighton and Hove Food Partnership, about a third of commercial waste from restaurants derives from customer food orders.

With this factored in, the public throws away more than 50% of our food waste.

Vic Borrill, the director of the food partnership, said: “We believe that waste policies should start with preventing and reusing, before moving to ways to process waste.

“We know most people waste more food than they think and could save an average of £50 per month if they didn’t throw away food that could have been eaten.

Mrs Borrill added: “With that price tag, prevention is definitely better than disposal.

“If you want to reduce your waste we suggest you plan your shop, make sure to store food properly, use appropriate portions, love those leftovers with our recipes and tips and compost your peelings.” The partnership says the two main reasons why people throw away good food are because they cook too much or do not use it in time.

The sessions

The following public consultation sessions will take place: Bartholomew House Customer Service Centre, Bartholomew Square, Brighton, Monday, August 11, 10am to 1pm Hastings Borough Council Community Contact Centre, Town Hall, Hastings, Tuesday, August 12, 9.30am to 12.30pm Bexhill Library, Western Road, Bexhill, Tuesday, August 12, 2pm to 5pm Lewes District Council Offices, 20 Fort Road, Newhaven, Thursday, August 14, 9.30am-12.30pm Wealden District Council Offices, Vicarage Lane, Hailsham, Friday, August 15, 10am-1pm.

The opposition

DESPITE strong for recycling history tells us controversy is never far from such new developments.

In February 2009, Brighton and Hove City Council opened a waste transfer station in Hollingdean, Brighton, costing £13 million.

The site was a disused collection of industrial units neighbouring the authority’s bin lorry depot.

Concerns were raised over access and noise.

Campaign group Dump the Dump, together with parents of children from local schools, believed the area would suffer pollution and noise as a result of the development.

More recently, a rubbish incinerator near Newhaven opened in the summer of 2012.

At the time, Paul-John Harris of Newhaven wrote to The Argus to say: “Not only is it ugly, looking like a giant glass mushroom, it has two large chimneystacks reaching into the sky, belching out smoke 24-7.

“It is polluting the environment and stinks of rotting garbage.”

Others commented on the increased lorry traffic in the lead-up to its opening.

Extension of existing sites

As it says, this is where an existing plant has a vacant site next to it capable, in principle, of also supporting waste treatment. Again, there would be issues to consider at the planning stage.

Cophall Wood Waste Transfer Station (land north of), A22, Polegate = E/A on map Woodside Depot, A22, Polegate = E/B on map

Areas for mixed use

These are areas proposed by a borough or district council for mixed use development as part of the expansion of an urban area. These will be dependent on when the expansion is brought forward and on the phasing of housing and employment.

Burgess Road, Hastings = S/A on map Ivyhouse Lane Extension, Hastings = S/B on map Sidley (land north of), Bexhill = S/C on map West Uckfield (land at), Uckfield = S/D on map Whitworth Road, Hastings = S/E on map

Comments (18)

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1:21pm Sat 9 Aug 14

yatman says...

How is the level of recycling going in Brighton and Hove? Could someone remind us please?
How is the level of recycling going in Brighton and Hove? Could someone remind us please? yatman
  • Score: 16

2:52pm Sat 9 Aug 14

Can this be says...

Right hands and left hands spring to mind. A couple of weeks ago Hangleton Bottom was being flagged up for housing.
Right hands and left hands spring to mind. A couple of weeks ago Hangleton Bottom was being flagged up for housing. Can this be
  • Score: 5

6:56pm Sat 9 Aug 14

Hove Actually says...

Is it me or wasn't the Sackville Road Industrial estate being touted as the "new" centre for Hove with a Town Square and a Walking link to the parks and Railway Station.

No mention of all the waste from London that we have to deal with here as well
Is it me or wasn't the Sackville Road Industrial estate being touted as the "new" centre for Hove with a Town Square and a Walking link to the parks and Railway Station. No mention of all the waste from London that we have to deal with here as well Hove Actually
  • Score: 8

7:14pm Sat 9 Aug 14

Valerie Paynter says...

The owners of the Sackville Trading Estate in Hove bought the land along the northside of the tracks in Hove by the Station which is earmarked for the waste local plan.

Residents wanting a good redevelopment of the Trading Estate (including a pedestrian link back along the area toward Hove Station) and appropriate development around Hove Station which will help with creation of housing please object to the waste local plan retaining this site for waste, recycling,etc. It is holding up redevelopment that will benefit the area.

As a public transport hub, Hove Station is the place to put commuter housing and mixed development that brings people there on the buses & trains - not waste on the train.

The Leighton Road depot is yards away and offers a more suitable site for a Waste Transfer Station that uses the rail lines.
The owners of the Sackville Trading Estate in Hove bought the land along the northside of the tracks in Hove by the Station which is earmarked for the waste local plan. Residents wanting a good redevelopment of the Trading Estate (including a pedestrian link back along the area toward Hove Station) and appropriate development around Hove Station which will help with creation of housing please object to the waste local plan retaining this site for waste, recycling,etc. It is holding up redevelopment that will benefit the area. As a public transport hub, Hove Station is the place to put commuter housing and mixed development that brings people there on the buses & trains - not waste on the train. The Leighton Road depot is yards away and offers a more suitable site for a Waste Transfer Station that uses the rail lines. Valerie Paynter
  • Score: 2

8:11pm Sat 9 Aug 14

s&k says...

Despite thousands of objections B&h cc built the waste transfer facility behind downs infant school and what do residents experience? Noise and terrible odours so good luck with the consultations because the council will ignore you cos the deals already done.
Despite thousands of objections B&h cc built the waste transfer facility behind downs infant school and what do residents experience? Noise and terrible odours so good luck with the consultations because the council will ignore you cos the deals already done. s&k
  • Score: 8

8:37pm Sat 9 Aug 14

rolivan says...

Could somebody wake Cllr Lizzie Deane from her Dream.
Could somebody wake Cllr Lizzie Deane from her Dream. rolivan
  • Score: 0

2:43am Sun 10 Aug 14

empathetickitty says...

yatman wrote:
How is the level of recycling going in Brighton and Hove? Could someone remind us please?
Brighton and Hove's current recycling rate is a very poor 25.2%. It had crept up to just over 29% prior to 2013's bin strikes. The national average is 42%.
The city needs REIY and REuse depots and comprehensive household + commercial food waste (compostables) system together with direct investment to support local waste prevention projects - and this needs to be done fast. The city is exploding with waste prevention expertise, circular economy initiatives and social enterprises to counter waste issues but there is currently a lack of joined up thinking and visionary leadership to maximise their impact.
[quote][p][bold]yatman[/bold] wrote: How is the level of recycling going in Brighton and Hove? Could someone remind us please?[/p][/quote]Brighton and Hove's current recycling rate is a very poor 25.2%. It had crept up to just over 29% prior to 2013's bin strikes. The national average is 42%. The city needs REIY and REuse depots and comprehensive household + commercial food waste (compostables) system together with direct investment to support local waste prevention projects - and this needs to be done fast. The city is exploding with waste prevention expertise, circular economy initiatives and social enterprises to counter waste issues but there is currently a lack of joined up thinking and visionary leadership to maximise their impact. empathetickitty
  • Score: 3

7:52am Sun 10 Aug 14

HJarrs says...

Unfortunately, the opportunity to design out waste has not been grasped. Standardised packaging for reuse and final recycling is low hanging fruit and was common only a couple of generations ago; recycled beer, milk and pop bottles were all collected and in Germany this is still the case. As a first step I would encourage standard bottles with deposits and make shops responsible for returns. This could also apply to plastic bottles. We could also look to remove non-recyclable plastics from packaging.

Getting supermarket shopping or vegetable boxes delivered reduces the opportunity to overbuy (which the supermarkets are particularly good at getting us to do).
Unfortunately, the opportunity to design out waste has not been grasped. Standardised packaging for reuse and final recycling is low hanging fruit and was common only a couple of generations ago; recycled beer, milk and pop bottles were all collected and in Germany this is still the case. As a first step I would encourage standard bottles with deposits and make shops responsible for returns. This could also apply to plastic bottles. We could also look to remove non-recyclable plastics from packaging. Getting supermarket shopping or vegetable boxes delivered reduces the opportunity to overbuy (which the supermarkets are particularly good at getting us to do). HJarrs
  • Score: 2

8:32am Sun 10 Aug 14

We love Red Billy says...

HJarrs wrote:
Unfortunately, the opportunity to design out waste has not been grasped. Standardised packaging for reuse and final recycling is low hanging fruit and was common only a couple of generations ago; recycled beer, milk and pop bottles were all collected and in Germany this is still the case. As a first step I would encourage standard bottles with deposits and make shops responsible for returns. This could also apply to plastic bottles. We could also look to remove non-recyclable plastics from packaging.

Getting supermarket shopping or vegetable boxes delivered reduces the opportunity to overbuy (which the supermarkets are particularly good at getting us to do).
For once I am in agreement with you Steve. !st money I ever made as a kid was dumpster diving in Germany to find beer bottles for return. Self reliance and green.
[quote][p][bold]HJarrs[/bold] wrote: Unfortunately, the opportunity to design out waste has not been grasped. Standardised packaging for reuse and final recycling is low hanging fruit and was common only a couple of generations ago; recycled beer, milk and pop bottles were all collected and in Germany this is still the case. As a first step I would encourage standard bottles with deposits and make shops responsible for returns. This could also apply to plastic bottles. We could also look to remove non-recyclable plastics from packaging. Getting supermarket shopping or vegetable boxes delivered reduces the opportunity to overbuy (which the supermarkets are particularly good at getting us to do).[/p][/quote]For once I am in agreement with you Steve. !st money I ever made as a kid was dumpster diving in Germany to find beer bottles for return. Self reliance and green. We love Red Billy
  • Score: 0

9:17am Sun 10 Aug 14

Plantpot says...

The thing that I learned about the stadium planning battle is that despite failing the test of need, and failing to meet planning regulations, the stadium was still built. This is because planning is a quasi-judicial process. In effect, this means that arbitrary decisions can be made for any reason at all. Therefore, campaigning against a waste processing site won't make a blind bit of difference. If it's expedient for someone to put it in a certain location, then that is what is going to happen.
The thing that I learned about the stadium planning battle is that despite failing the test of need, and failing to meet planning regulations, the stadium was still built. This is because planning is a quasi-judicial process. In effect, this means that arbitrary decisions can be made for any reason at all. Therefore, campaigning against a waste processing site won't make a blind bit of difference. If it's expedient for someone to put it in a certain location, then that is what is going to happen. Plantpot
  • Score: 2

9:53am Sun 10 Aug 14

Morpheus says...

We wouldn't be throwing so much rubbish away if everything we buy didn't come with so much extra packaging.
We wouldn't be throwing so much rubbish away if everything we buy didn't come with so much extra packaging. Morpheus
  • Score: 5

10:31am Sun 10 Aug 14

getThisCoalitionOut says...

You would expect a Green council to be making waves in the recycling dept
You would expect a Green council to be making waves in the recycling dept getThisCoalitionOut
  • Score: 2

10:31am Sun 10 Aug 14

NathanAdler says...

With regards to B&H, it is truly one of the great ironies on Earth that the Green Party are one of the worse recycling councils in the whole of the UK.

1. The separation of waste (not hard but annoying for many)
2. The refusal of collectors not to mix some goods
3. No provision for tetra packs
4. No provision for batteries
5. No free provision for garden waste
6. No provision for food waste
7. Did not vote for prisoners to sift through general waste for recyclable goods.
8. Some of the most expensive taxes for businesses to have their recyclable goods collected.

Feel free to add to this list. I am only comparing Worthing Council and Bristol, both of whom are far better than B&H!!
With regards to B&H, it is truly one of the great ironies on Earth that the Green Party are one of the worse recycling councils in the whole of the UK. 1. The separation of waste (not hard but annoying for many) 2. The refusal of collectors not to mix some goods 3. No provision for tetra packs 4. No provision for batteries 5. No free provision for garden waste 6. No provision for food waste 7. Did not vote for prisoners to sift through general waste for recyclable goods. 8. Some of the most expensive taxes for businesses to have their recyclable goods collected. Feel free to add to this list. I am only comparing Worthing Council and Bristol, both of whom are far better than B&H!! NathanAdler
  • Score: 3

11:54am Sun 10 Aug 14

makoshark says...

I am still quite amazed that East Sussex / B&HBC is one of the few areas in the UK that do not have any anaerobic digestion facilites to utilize all forms of organic waste in the biological creation of biogas / electricity generated in a clean and low cost manner...
I am still quite amazed that East Sussex / B&HBC is one of the few areas in the UK that do not have any anaerobic digestion facilites to utilize all forms of organic waste in the biological creation of biogas / electricity generated in a clean and low cost manner... makoshark
  • Score: 1

3:18pm Sun 10 Aug 14

HJarrs says...

NathanAdler wrote:
With regards to B&H, it is truly one of the great ironies on Earth that the Green Party are one of the worse recycling councils in the whole of the UK.

1. The separation of waste (not hard but annoying for many)
2. The refusal of collectors not to mix some goods
3. No provision for tetra packs
4. No provision for batteries
5. No free provision for garden waste
6. No provision for food waste
7. Did not vote for prisoners to sift through general waste for recyclable goods.
8. Some of the most expensive taxes for businesses to have their recyclable goods collected.

Feel free to add to this list. I am only comparing Worthing Council and Bristol, both of whom are far better than B&H!!
It is a great irony that an expensive PFI recycling facility was built and 25 year waste contract signed and recycling went down! That was a combination of Labour and Conservative administrations. I am afraid nobody has done very well at recycling in the city. However, this is all end-of-the-pipe stuff. Waste should be reduced by designing it out in the first place.
[quote][p][bold]NathanAdler[/bold] wrote: With regards to B&H, it is truly one of the great ironies on Earth that the Green Party are one of the worse recycling councils in the whole of the UK. 1. The separation of waste (not hard but annoying for many) 2. The refusal of collectors not to mix some goods 3. No provision for tetra packs 4. No provision for batteries 5. No free provision for garden waste 6. No provision for food waste 7. Did not vote for prisoners to sift through general waste for recyclable goods. 8. Some of the most expensive taxes for businesses to have their recyclable goods collected. Feel free to add to this list. I am only comparing Worthing Council and Bristol, both of whom are far better than B&H!![/p][/quote]It is a great irony that an expensive PFI recycling facility was built and 25 year waste contract signed and recycling went down! That was a combination of Labour and Conservative administrations. I am afraid nobody has done very well at recycling in the city. However, this is all end-of-the-pipe stuff. Waste should be reduced by designing it out in the first place. HJarrs
  • Score: 0

10:51am Mon 11 Aug 14

Verushka26 says...

Morpheus wrote:
We wouldn't be throwing so much rubbish away if everything we buy didn't come with so much extra packaging.
My rubbish bin and I totally agree with you there, but I have to add that we wouldn't be using so much extra packaging if we didn't rely on convenience supermarket shopping and 365-day seasons. Going zero-waste is doable, but it involves your local butcher, baker, bulk food co-op and veg market (or whole lot of skip-diving!). The supermarket stance is simple - if we want produce shipped from Spain or Turkey (or Chile!) it will come in protective packaging.
[quote][p][bold]Morpheus[/bold] wrote: We wouldn't be throwing so much rubbish away if everything we buy didn't come with so much extra packaging.[/p][/quote]My rubbish bin and I totally agree with you there, but I have to add that we wouldn't be using so much extra packaging if we didn't rely on convenience supermarket shopping and 365-day seasons. Going zero-waste is doable, but it involves your local butcher, baker, bulk food co-op and veg market (or whole lot of skip-diving!). The supermarket stance is simple - if we want produce shipped from Spain or Turkey (or Chile!) it will come in protective packaging. Verushka26
  • Score: 1

2:56pm Mon 11 Aug 14

s_james says...

Designing out waste and reducing packaging can make a contribution but we will still need more waste facilities if we are to eliminate landfill
Designing out waste and reducing packaging can make a contribution but we will still need more waste facilities if we are to eliminate landfill s_james
  • Score: 0

10:48pm Mon 11 Aug 14

Rita Snatch says...

The recycling in Brighton/Hove has again diminished due to the cessation of the household brown boxes. Most of us now just dispose of all our waste as general waste - rather than feed item through the hairy letterboxes of the static waste containers.
The recycling in Brighton/Hove has again diminished due to the cessation of the household brown boxes. Most of us now just dispose of all our waste as general waste - rather than feed item through the hairy letterboxes of the static waste containers. Rita Snatch
  • Score: 0

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