Dying man has Rolex watch stolen from him in Chichester's St Richard's Hospital

David Davies

David Davies

First published in News by

A dying patient had his Rolex watch stolen while in a Sussex hospital.

David Davies, of Birdham, near Chichester, was brought by ambulance to St Richard's Hospital in Chichester suffering from a serious heart condition.

He died a short while later.

But police are now investigating what happened to the 68-year old's valuable Rolex watch.

At some point between 6am and 7.15am while he was being attended to in the Resuscitation Area area adjacent to A&E, the watch disappeared and despite a thorough search of the area, and checks with staff who were on duty at the time, it has not yet been found.

 

Police are treating the disappearance as theft.

Detective Constable Mark Burgess said; "This is a silver Submariner Rolex, valued at some £5,000, but, even more importantly, was treated as a family heirloom having been in the family since 1985. If you have any information about the theft, or if you have been offered such a watch locally since last Thursday, we would very much like to hear from you. Contact us via 101@sussex.pnn.police.uk or call 101, quoting serial 0385 of 7/8. You can also call the independent charity Crimestoppers via 0800 555 111.

"Although Mr Davies was in the Resuscitation Area at the time, someone else could have entered while staff were so busy arranging for his care."

Mr Davies' son John said ''As a family we are devastated at the loss of David and cannot believe that this has happened during our time of grief. We would appeal to anyone who has information about the missing watch to come forward, David dearly loved the watch and its loss has added to the stress and grief that the family are already going through.''

In a statement, Western Sussex Hospitals Foundation NHS Trust said: "We would like to extend our deepest sympathy to the family at this difficult time and apologise also for the loss of this valuable item while in our care. The hospital is doing everything it can to help the police in their enquiries, which we hope will recover the watch as quickly as possible. The Trust is unable to make any further comment while the police investigation is ongoing."

Comments (17)

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4:54pm Wed 13 Aug 14

stevo!! says...

"Although Mr Davies was in the Resuscitation Area at the time, someone else could have entered while staff were so busy arranging for his care."

Or one of the staff could have taken it. After all:

"At some point between 6am and 7.15am while he was being attended to in the Resuscitation Area area adjacent to A&E, the watch disappeared"

So it happened whilst he was being attended to, not at a time when he was left alone.

I would hate to think that the last thing he ever saw was his watch being stolen. It belongs to one of his loved ones.
"Although Mr Davies was in the Resuscitation Area at the time, someone else could have entered while staff were so busy arranging for his care." Or one of the staff could have taken it. After all: "At some point between 6am and 7.15am while he was being attended to in the Resuscitation Area area adjacent to A&E, the watch disappeared" So it happened whilst he was being attended to, not at a time when he was left alone. I would hate to think that the last thing he ever saw was his watch being stolen. It belongs to one of his loved ones. stevo!!
  • Score: 1

5:12pm Wed 13 Aug 14

maxiboy_ says...

Possibly a rotten apple in the NHS.
Possibly a rotten apple in the NHS. maxiboy_
  • Score: 17

5:40pm Wed 13 Aug 14

Wide Bertha says...

whoever took it, it's despicable.
whoever took it, it's despicable. Wide Bertha
  • Score: 24

6:15pm Wed 13 Aug 14

Youlikemyjugs says...

Obscene
Obscene Youlikemyjugs
  • Score: 16

6:38pm Wed 13 Aug 14

cvs says...

Surely all hospital areas like this will be covered by cctv
Surely all hospital areas like this will be covered by cctv cvs
  • Score: 8

6:42pm Wed 13 Aug 14

stevo!! says...

cvs wrote:
Surely all hospital areas like this will be covered by cctv
The Resuscitation area might not be, for obvious reasons.

If it were, the suspect would have at least been captured on video, even if not identified.

However, they should have a visual record of all those near the entrance at the relevant period.
[quote][p][bold]cvs[/bold] wrote: Surely all hospital areas like this will be covered by cctv[/p][/quote]The Resuscitation area might not be, for obvious reasons. If it were, the suspect would have at least been captured on video, even if not identified. However, they should have a visual record of all those near the entrance at the relevant period. stevo!!
  • Score: 1

8:24pm Wed 13 Aug 14

Valerie Paynter says...

As a transplant renal patient I occasionally need to be taken to A&E with an issue that needs urgent attention. Since 1990 I have been in there on perhaps 6-8 occasions. On one - some years ago now - I was shocked that there were male nurses looking very clubby.....punk clubby with all the piercings and wild hair colour.

Two colourful male nurses came into the cubicle asking the usual - about my medication, etc. and I had a print-out to give them. One of them looked sideways and back at his companion to communicate clocking the spot where my bag was on a side table near me. They left the cubicle.

When one came back later he did a double take on entry. My bag was no longer on that table. It was looped round my arm and on the trolley close by me.

Back around 1990-2/3 on a clinic visit I too lost a watch. A very expensive watch. But nobody knew anything about it....

In 2001 - on the ward for a spine problem and surgery - my HAIRBRUSH was stolen from the bedside table. I went wild and a nurse "found" it on another patient's table. I had been nowhere near that end of the ward.

These days at the RSCH you are quickly pounced on no matter the state you are in to empty bags and provide an inventory of what you have with you. It goes on a form. Two things about this. One it alerts potential thieves of what is on offer. But from their perspective, it prevents claims of theft for things not carried.

Patients are in a problem because you need things like mobile phones with you these days and some cash for bits. Toiletries, newspapers, etc. But bring rubbish you don't mind losing is my advice. No expensive slippers, dressing gowns, toiletry bags, etc. And no watches or jewellery of any kind. Zilch.
As a transplant renal patient I occasionally need to be taken to A&E with an issue that needs urgent attention. Since 1990 I have been in there on perhaps 6-8 occasions. On one - some years ago now - I was shocked that there were male nurses looking very clubby.....punk clubby with all the piercings and wild hair colour. Two colourful male nurses came into the cubicle asking the usual - about my medication, etc. and I had a print-out to give them. One of them looked sideways and back at his companion to communicate clocking the spot where my bag was on a side table near me. They left the cubicle. When one came back later he did a double take on entry. My bag was no longer on that table. It was looped round my arm and on the trolley close by me. Back around 1990-2/3 on a clinic visit I too lost a watch. A very expensive watch. But nobody knew anything about it.... In 2001 - on the ward for a spine problem and surgery - my HAIRBRUSH was stolen from the bedside table. I went wild and a nurse "found" it on another patient's table. I had been nowhere near that end of the ward. These days at the RSCH you are quickly pounced on no matter the state you are in to empty bags and provide an inventory of what you have with you. It goes on a form. Two things about this. One it alerts potential thieves of what is on offer. But from their perspective, it prevents claims of theft for things not carried. Patients are in a problem because you need things like mobile phones with you these days and some cash for bits. Toiletries, newspapers, etc. But bring rubbish you don't mind losing is my advice. No expensive slippers, dressing gowns, toiletry bags, etc. And no watches or jewellery of any kind. Zilch. Valerie Paynter
  • Score: 6

8:31pm Wed 13 Aug 14

Valerie Paynter says...

cvs wrote:
Surely all hospital areas like this will be covered by cctv
Definitely not patient cubicles or wards attached to A&E or general wards. There would be issues around privacy when you are perhaps naked or whatever.
[quote][p][bold]cvs[/bold] wrote: Surely all hospital areas like this will be covered by cctv[/p][/quote]Definitely not patient cubicles or wards attached to A&E or general wards. There would be issues around privacy when you are perhaps naked or whatever. Valerie Paynter
  • Score: 1

8:31pm Wed 13 Aug 14

stevo!! says...

Valerie Paynter wrote:
As a transplant renal patient I occasionally need to be taken to A&E with an issue that needs urgent attention. Since 1990 I have been in there on perhaps 6-8 occasions. On one - some years ago now - I was shocked that there were male nurses looking very clubby.....punk clubby with all the piercings and wild hair colour.

Two colourful male nurses came into the cubicle asking the usual - about my medication, etc. and I had a print-out to give them. One of them looked sideways and back at his companion to communicate clocking the spot where my bag was on a side table near me. They left the cubicle.

When one came back later he did a double take on entry. My bag was no longer on that table. It was looped round my arm and on the trolley close by me.

Back around 1990-2/3 on a clinic visit I too lost a watch. A very expensive watch. But nobody knew anything about it....

In 2001 - on the ward for a spine problem and surgery - my HAIRBRUSH was stolen from the bedside table. I went wild and a nurse "found" it on another patient's table. I had been nowhere near that end of the ward.

These days at the RSCH you are quickly pounced on no matter the state you are in to empty bags and provide an inventory of what you have with you. It goes on a form. Two things about this. One it alerts potential thieves of what is on offer. But from their perspective, it prevents claims of theft for things not carried.

Patients are in a problem because you need things like mobile phones with you these days and some cash for bits. Toiletries, newspapers, etc. But bring rubbish you don't mind losing is my advice. No expensive slippers, dressing gowns, toiletry bags, etc. And no watches or jewellery of any kind. Zilch.
Given the amount of trashy people the NHS employs these days, I'm surprised that anyone leaves hospital with all their possessions.
[quote][p][bold]Valerie Paynter[/bold] wrote: As a transplant renal patient I occasionally need to be taken to A&E with an issue that needs urgent attention. Since 1990 I have been in there on perhaps 6-8 occasions. On one - some years ago now - I was shocked that there were male nurses looking very clubby.....punk clubby with all the piercings and wild hair colour. Two colourful male nurses came into the cubicle asking the usual - about my medication, etc. and I had a print-out to give them. One of them looked sideways and back at his companion to communicate clocking the spot where my bag was on a side table near me. They left the cubicle. When one came back later he did a double take on entry. My bag was no longer on that table. It was looped round my arm and on the trolley close by me. Back around 1990-2/3 on a clinic visit I too lost a watch. A very expensive watch. But nobody knew anything about it.... In 2001 - on the ward for a spine problem and surgery - my HAIRBRUSH was stolen from the bedside table. I went wild and a nurse "found" it on another patient's table. I had been nowhere near that end of the ward. These days at the RSCH you are quickly pounced on no matter the state you are in to empty bags and provide an inventory of what you have with you. It goes on a form. Two things about this. One it alerts potential thieves of what is on offer. But from their perspective, it prevents claims of theft for things not carried. Patients are in a problem because you need things like mobile phones with you these days and some cash for bits. Toiletries, newspapers, etc. But bring rubbish you don't mind losing is my advice. No expensive slippers, dressing gowns, toiletry bags, etc. And no watches or jewellery of any kind. Zilch.[/p][/quote]Given the amount of trashy people the NHS employs these days, I'm surprised that anyone leaves hospital with all their possessions. stevo!!
  • Score: -7

8:39pm Wed 13 Aug 14

stevo!! says...

Valerie Paynter wrote:
cvs wrote:
Surely all hospital areas like this will be covered by cctv
Definitely not patient cubicles or wards attached to A&E or general wards. There would be issues around privacy when you are perhaps naked or whatever.
Or dying.
[quote][p][bold]Valerie Paynter[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]cvs[/bold] wrote: Surely all hospital areas like this will be covered by cctv[/p][/quote]Definitely not patient cubicles or wards attached to A&E or general wards. There would be issues around privacy when you are perhaps naked or whatever.[/p][/quote]Or dying. stevo!!
  • Score: 1

10:32pm Wed 13 Aug 14

Vigilia says...

Will there ever be an end to the reports of this human depravity we read on these pages day after day?

Whilst I'm sure this behaviour is not exclusive to our City, it is becoming frighteningly familiar on a daily basis. To steal from the dying or the dead is the absolute nadir of depraved behaviour. I'm sickened.
Will there ever be an end to the reports of this human depravity we read on these pages day after day? Whilst I'm sure this behaviour is not exclusive to our City, it is becoming frighteningly familiar on a daily basis. To steal from the dying or the dead is the absolute nadir of depraved behaviour. I'm sickened. Vigilia
  • Score: 7

4:54am Thu 14 Aug 14

Dave At Home says...

Two of my relatives where taken into the RSCH (at different time) and both lost valuable items of jewellery in there, one even 'lost' a pair of dentures. It's a shame to think that a member of staff is taking it, worse that patients are up to mischief in there. Never got any of the missing items back, I hope karma works her magic on those light fingered people.
Two of my relatives where taken into the RSCH (at different time) and both lost valuable items of jewellery in there, one even 'lost' a pair of dentures. It's a shame to think that a member of staff is taking it, worse that patients are up to mischief in there. Never got any of the missing items back, I hope karma works her magic on those light fingered people. Dave At Home
  • Score: 5

6:33am Thu 14 Aug 14

Anna Phylactic says...

All Rolex watches have a unique serial number on them which is on the paperwork of the original sale and on all certificates of service. Rolex UK keep a lost and stolen database. They should be notified of the serial number and the circumstances and if/when it next shows up for service it'll be rescued.

There are also "lost/stolen" threads on watch collector/dealer websites and these would alert hundreds of collectors to keep their eyes open.

Hope they find the person that did it.
All Rolex watches have a unique serial number on them which is on the paperwork of the original sale and on all certificates of service. Rolex UK keep a lost and stolen database. They should be notified of the serial number and the circumstances and if/when it next shows up for service it'll be rescued. There are also "lost/stolen" threads on watch collector/dealer websites and these would alert hundreds of collectors to keep their eyes open. Hope they find the person that did it. Anna Phylactic
  • Score: 7

7:49am Thu 14 Aug 14

hoveguyactually says...

But why on earth should someone need to have a watch valued at £5,000 anyway? A watch is a watch, not a diamond necklace.
But why on earth should someone need to have a watch valued at £5,000 anyway? A watch is a watch, not a diamond necklace. hoveguyactually
  • Score: -4

8:37am Thu 14 Aug 14

gheese77 says...

hoveguyactually wrote:
But why on earth should someone need to have a watch valued at £5,000 anyway? A watch is a watch, not a diamond necklace.
Its a status symbol - it says - "I am considerably richer than you"
[quote][p][bold]hoveguyactually[/bold] wrote: But why on earth should someone need to have a watch valued at £5,000 anyway? A watch is a watch, not a diamond necklace.[/p][/quote]Its a status symbol - it says - "I am considerably richer than you" gheese77
  • Score: 0

10:26am Thu 14 Aug 14

Valerie Paynter says...

stevo!! wrote:
Valerie Paynter wrote:
As a transplant renal patient I occasionally need to be taken to A&E with an issue that needs urgent attention. Since 1990 I have been in there on perhaps 6-8 occasions. On one - some years ago now - I was shocked that there were male nurses looking very clubby.....punk clubby with all the piercings and wild hair colour.

Two colourful male nurses came into the cubicle asking the usual - about my medication, etc. and I had a print-out to give them. One of them looked sideways and back at his companion to communicate clocking the spot where my bag was on a side table near me. They left the cubicle.

When one came back later he did a double take on entry. My bag was no longer on that table. It was looped round my arm and on the trolley close by me.

Back around 1990-2/3 on a clinic visit I too lost a watch. A very expensive watch. But nobody knew anything about it....

In 2001 - on the ward for a spine problem and surgery - my HAIRBRUSH was stolen from the bedside table. I went wild and a nurse "found" it on another patient's table. I had been nowhere near that end of the ward.

These days at the RSCH you are quickly pounced on no matter the state you are in to empty bags and provide an inventory of what you have with you. It goes on a form. Two things about this. One it alerts potential thieves of what is on offer. But from their perspective, it prevents claims of theft for things not carried.

Patients are in a problem because you need things like mobile phones with you these days and some cash for bits. Toiletries, newspapers, etc. But bring rubbish you don't mind losing is my advice. No expensive slippers, dressing gowns, toiletry bags, etc. And no watches or jewellery of any kind. Zilch.
Given the amount of trashy people the NHS employs these days, I'm surprised that anyone leaves hospital with all their possessions.
Hospitals should mount period stings. Put location trackers on a few valuables and put them in harms way to see who takes the bait.
[quote][p][bold]stevo!![/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Valerie Paynter[/bold] wrote: As a transplant renal patient I occasionally need to be taken to A&E with an issue that needs urgent attention. Since 1990 I have been in there on perhaps 6-8 occasions. On one - some years ago now - I was shocked that there were male nurses looking very clubby.....punk clubby with all the piercings and wild hair colour. Two colourful male nurses came into the cubicle asking the usual - about my medication, etc. and I had a print-out to give them. One of them looked sideways and back at his companion to communicate clocking the spot where my bag was on a side table near me. They left the cubicle. When one came back later he did a double take on entry. My bag was no longer on that table. It was looped round my arm and on the trolley close by me. Back around 1990-2/3 on a clinic visit I too lost a watch. A very expensive watch. But nobody knew anything about it.... In 2001 - on the ward for a spine problem and surgery - my HAIRBRUSH was stolen from the bedside table. I went wild and a nurse "found" it on another patient's table. I had been nowhere near that end of the ward. These days at the RSCH you are quickly pounced on no matter the state you are in to empty bags and provide an inventory of what you have with you. It goes on a form. Two things about this. One it alerts potential thieves of what is on offer. But from their perspective, it prevents claims of theft for things not carried. Patients are in a problem because you need things like mobile phones with you these days and some cash for bits. Toiletries, newspapers, etc. But bring rubbish you don't mind losing is my advice. No expensive slippers, dressing gowns, toiletry bags, etc. And no watches or jewellery of any kind. Zilch.[/p][/quote]Given the amount of trashy people the NHS employs these days, I'm surprised that anyone leaves hospital with all their possessions.[/p][/quote]Hospitals should mount period stings. Put location trackers on a few valuables and put them in harms way to see who takes the bait. Valerie Paynter
  • Score: 1

10:33am Thu 14 Aug 14

stevo!! says...

hoveguyactually wrote:
But why on earth should someone need to have a watch valued at £5,000 anyway? A watch is a watch, not a diamond necklace.
^^^^^^^^^^^^Stupid Comment Of The Week^^^^^^^^^^
[quote][p][bold]hoveguyactually[/bold] wrote: But why on earth should someone need to have a watch valued at £5,000 anyway? A watch is a watch, not a diamond necklace.[/p][/quote]^^^^^^^^^^^^Stupid Comment Of The Week^^^^^^^^^^ stevo!!
  • Score: 3

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