Flights could cost more if new Gatwick runway goes ahead

Flights could cost more if new Gatwick runway goes ahead

Flights could cost more if new Gatwick runway goes ahead

First published in News
Last updated

Flights could cost an additional £50 if a new runway goes ahead at Gatwick, campaigners have warned.

Research published this week by the Aviation Environment Federation examined who would pay for a new runway at Gatwick or Heathrow. It found a new runway at Gatwick would mean an increase in airport charges per passenger from £8 at present to £33.60 – an increase of £25 per flight, or £50 combined with the return flight.

At Heathrow the increase would be from £19 per passenger to £31 for a single flight. Brendon Sewill, of the Aviation Environment Federation, said: “Gatwick Airport often claims that a new runway at Gatwick would be cheaper than one at Heathrow. But what they do not mention is that the cost would need to be borne by roughly half as many passengers.”

The report calculations are based on the estimate made by the Airports Commission that a new Gatwick runway would cost £10 - £13 billion. The study was written by former Treasury adviser Brendon Sewill, chairman of the Gatwick Area Conservation Campaign.

In the article, it is asserted that “a new runway at Gatwick would mean an increase in airport charges per passenger from £8 at present to £33.60 – an increase of £25 per flight, or £50 combined with the return flight.”

The figures were challenged by Gatwick bosses who said the calculations were "simply not correct".

A spokesman said: "As has been stated previously – and repeatedly – the cost of building the second runway at Gatwick is £7.8 billion.

"While airport charges are already comparatively low at £9, the increase that would enable the runway to be built is also low.

"We estimate charges to increase to a range of £12 to £15 in the long-term.

"This is possible due to the scheme’s low cost, low delivery risk, and phased delivery programme."

 

 

Comments (4)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

8:18am Thu 4 Sep 14

Valentinian says...

Small price to pay, and still cheaper than travelling to Heathrow and parking there. Let's go for it!
Small price to pay, and still cheaper than travelling to Heathrow and parking there. Let's go for it! Valentinian
  • Score: 9

11:57am Thu 4 Sep 14

G Wiley says...

And why should we trust 'Aviation Environment Federation' and their facts and opinions?

According to their web site 'AEF is a UK-based organisation campaigning for aviation’s impacts on people and the environment to be brought within sustainable limits.'.

Apparently it is a non-goveerment organisation - which looks, IMHO, to be yet another self-appointed group of eco-activists and nimbys.
And why should we trust 'Aviation Environment Federation' and their facts and opinions? According to their web site 'AEF is a UK-based organisation campaigning for aviation’s impacts on people and the environment to be brought within sustainable limits.'. Apparently it is a non-goveerment organisation - which looks, IMHO, to be yet another self-appointed group of eco-activists and nimbys. G Wiley
  • Score: 9

12:58pm Thu 4 Sep 14

aat99 says...

build it at Gatwick and M23 will be much much busier plus the M25 getting to the M23 will be impacted...... all for a little bit of convenience a couple of times a year ...
build it at Gatwick and M23 will be much much busier plus the M25 getting to the M23 will be impacted...... all for a little bit of convenience a couple of times a year ... aat99
  • Score: -4

3:13pm Mon 8 Sep 14

KRIyengar says...

Brendon Sewill is a charlatan. People like him aren't average people who hold down ordinary jobs. he chose intentionally to live in an isolated, rural place like Charlwood. And where do people like him who ostensibly cherish the unspoilt Surrey and Sussex countryside actually work and do their shopping, and how do they get there? The answer is other towns and cities like Crawley, Brighton or London, to which they outsource their pollution by driving there in heavily polluting 4-by-4s. The car parks at the supre stores in Crawley at weekends is full of such vehicles belongign to people living in picturesque towns and villages in the vicinity of Gatwick , such as Balcombe, Charlwood, Rusper, Warnham etc., where residents resolutely oppose any commercial developments that actually create jobs. It is the socially exclusionary development policies advocated by these people that result in a lack of job creation and economic opportunities in the aforementioned places as well as bigger market towns with a similar demographic profile such as East Grinstead or Horsham, i.e. lots of upper middle class, middle-aged or elderly and predominantly white whose best years of their lives are behind them, that undermine job creation opportunities to those who are less fortunate then them and still have most of their futures ahead of them. Of course, they've got every right to their own opinions. After all, this is a free country. But they shouldn't be allowed to impose their views on others, to the detriment of the latter.
Brendon Sewill is a charlatan. People like him aren't average people who hold down ordinary jobs. he chose intentionally to live in an isolated, rural place like Charlwood. And where do people like him who ostensibly cherish the unspoilt Surrey and Sussex countryside actually work and do their shopping, and how do they get there? The answer is other towns and cities like Crawley, Brighton or London, to which they outsource their pollution by driving there in heavily polluting 4-by-4s. The car parks at the supre stores in Crawley at weekends is full of such vehicles belongign to people living in picturesque towns and villages in the vicinity of Gatwick , such as Balcombe, Charlwood, Rusper, Warnham etc., where residents resolutely oppose any commercial developments that actually create jobs. It is the socially exclusionary development policies advocated by these people that result in a lack of job creation and economic opportunities in the aforementioned places as well as bigger market towns with a similar demographic profile such as East Grinstead or Horsham, i.e. lots of upper middle class, middle-aged or elderly and predominantly white whose best years of their lives are behind them, that undermine job creation opportunities to those who are less fortunate then them and still have most of their futures ahead of them. Of course, they've got every right to their own opinions. After all, this is a free country. But they shouldn't be allowed to impose their views on others, to the detriment of the latter. KRIyengar
  • Score: 1

Comments are closed on this article.

Send us your news, pictures and videos

Most read stories

Local Info

Enter your postcode, town or place name

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree