Sussex dialect being wiped out by commuting

First published in News by , Chief reporter

Sussex's regional accents are in danger of dying out.

Academic studies have found that many regional accents including Geordie, Scouse, Mancunian and Brummie are becoming more distinct, but southern dialects, particularly the East and West Sussex accents, are becoming less noticeable.

Researchers found that “commuter culture” meant big city accents were surviving, but colonising the way people talk in surrounding areas.

Linguistics experts from universities across the country found northern accents thriving as people with strong accents, like Ant and Dec and Cheryl Cole, featured prominently on TV.

Paul Kerswill, a professor of sociolinguistics at Lancaster University, said: “Northerners do not want to sound like Southerners.

“Accents are more varied in northern England because they have not been subjected to the mass levelling of speech caused by London and its commuting hinterland.

“In the southeast, Kent, Essex and East and West Sussex are all losing their distinctive accents while the capital’s own Cockney is also under threat.”

Comments (13)

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7:38pm Sun 3 Jan 10

blardeblar says...

Great story, really interesting.
Great story, really interesting. blardeblar
  • Score: 0

7:58pm Sun 3 Jan 10

TheInsider says...

The new Sussex dialect seems to involve an f-word and a c-word and a b-word every five seconds.
New Year's Eve brought a whole load of people out speaking this new Sussex dialect, mainly spoken by young men and women who like to do it as loudly as possible when talking about even the most mundane subjects....the f-ing milkman, broughmen two c-ing bottles of wan**ing milk today.
I do wish people would stop swearing in every day life.
The new Sussex dialect seems to involve an f-word and a c-word and a b-word every five seconds. New Year's Eve brought a whole load of people out speaking this new Sussex dialect, mainly spoken by young men and women who like to do it as loudly as possible when talking about even the most mundane subjects....the f-ing milkman, broughmen two c-ing bottles of wan**ing milk today. I do wish people would stop swearing in every day life. TheInsider
  • Score: 0

9:10pm Sun 3 Jan 10

puddingandpi says...

I was rather under the impression that the "Sussex" accent was a sort of Mockney, Estuary English or a generic "posh" a la Muesli Mountain.
I'm from the North & people say to me "you haven't lost your accent, have you?" To which I reply, you mean I haven't aped the pronunciations of the natives?
Everyone should be proud of their accent.
I was rather under the impression that the "Sussex" accent was a sort of Mockney, Estuary English or a generic "posh" a la Muesli Mountain. I'm from the North & people say to me "you haven't lost your accent, have you?" To which I reply, you mean I haven't aped the pronunciations of the natives? Everyone should be proud of their accent. puddingandpi
  • Score: 0

9:11pm Sun 3 Jan 10

mark by the sea says...

TheInsider wrote:
The new Sussex dialect seems to involve an f-word and a c-word and a b-word every five seconds. New Year's Eve brought a whole load of people out speaking this new Sussex dialect, mainly spoken by young men and women who like to do it as loudly as possible when talking about even the most mundane subjects....the f-ing milkman, broughmen two c-ing bottles of wan**ing milk today. I do wish people would stop swearing in every day life.
is it accents? or are peole just thick? also what is it with people doing the yank slang? init? man! blood! this from people that have never been out of brighton! lol
[quote][p][bold]TheInsider[/bold] wrote: The new Sussex dialect seems to involve an f-word and a c-word and a b-word every five seconds. New Year's Eve brought a whole load of people out speaking this new Sussex dialect, mainly spoken by young men and women who like to do it as loudly as possible when talking about even the most mundane subjects....the f-ing milkman, broughmen two c-ing bottles of wan**ing milk today. I do wish people would stop swearing in every day life.[/p][/quote]is it accents? or are peole just thick? also what is it with people doing the yank slang? init? man! blood! this from people that have never been out of brighton! lol mark by the sea
  • Score: 0

9:46pm Sun 3 Jan 10

cheezburger says...

No such thing as a West Sussex accent, just nonsense. Non story.
No such thing as a West Sussex accent, just nonsense. Non story. cheezburger
  • Score: 0

10:11pm Sun 3 Jan 10

onerob says...

There is – or was – a distinctive Sussex accent. The way the letter "i" in words is pronounced is different, e.g. "rice with spice" would sound different from the lips of a working class Brightonian than a cockney.
There is – or was – a distinctive Sussex accent. The way the letter "i" in words is pronounced is different, e.g. "rice with spice" would sound different from the lips of a working class Brightonian than a cockney. onerob
  • Score: 0

2:02am Mon 4 Jan 10

7Dials says...

This is news to me......I still hear variations if you travel around. Yar nar wat I mean geeza?
This is news to me......I still hear variations if you travel around. Yar nar wat I mean geeza? 7Dials
  • Score: 0

2:02am Mon 4 Jan 10

7Dials says...

This is news to me......I still hear variations if you travel around. Yar nar wat I mean geeza?
This is news to me......I still hear variations if you travel around. Yar nar wat I mean geeza? 7Dials
  • Score: 0

7:39am Mon 4 Jan 10

cheezburger says...

onerob wrote:
There is – or was – a distinctive Sussex accent. The way the letter "i" in words is pronounced is different, e.g. "rice with spice" would sound different from the lips of a working class Brightonian than a cockney.
Of course cockneys sound different from Brightonians, which does not mean theres a distinctive Brighton accent. Besides the article mentions West Sussex accents, and Brighton isnt in West Sussex.
[quote][p][bold]onerob[/bold] wrote: There is – or was – a distinctive Sussex accent. The way the letter "i" in words is pronounced is different, e.g. "rice with spice" would sound different from the lips of a working class Brightonian than a cockney.[/p][/quote]Of course cockneys sound different from Brightonians, which does not mean theres a distinctive Brighton accent. Besides the article mentions West Sussex accents, and Brighton isnt in West Sussex. cheezburger
  • Score: 0

9:58am Mon 4 Jan 10

Tye says...

cheezburger wrote:
No such thing as a West Sussex accent, just nonsense. Non story.
Those who cannot criticise :(

Might I suggest you set up a website with items of news that you think interesting - and then WE can be an irritating moaney minnie-
boring
advert
not interesting
PS Where did it say WEST Sussex accent anyway - surely that a council made distinction
[quote][p][bold]cheezburger[/bold] wrote: No such thing as a West Sussex accent, just nonsense. Non story.[/p][/quote]Those who cannot criticise :( Might I suggest you set up a website with items of news that you think interesting - and then WE can be an irritating moaney minnie- boring advert not interesting PS Where did it say WEST Sussex accent anyway - surely that a council made distinction Tye
  • Score: 0

1:09pm Mon 4 Jan 10

She-Ra, Princess Of Power says...

onerob wrote:
There is – or was – a distinctive Sussex accent. The way the letter "i" in words is pronounced is different, e.g. "rice with spice" would sound different from the lips of a working class Brightonian than a cockney.
There still is, in the more rural areas, amongst older people. "Cows" becomes "cuws", "ours" becomes "aiurs"...

Of course those accents are diminishing.... slowly but surely the South is becoming one bland southern dialect. Which is a shame, because the true Sussex accent is a good one!
[quote][p][bold]onerob[/bold] wrote: There is – or was – a distinctive Sussex accent. The way the letter "i" in words is pronounced is different, e.g. "rice with spice" would sound different from the lips of a working class Brightonian than a cockney.[/p][/quote]There still is, in the more rural areas, amongst older people. "Cows" becomes "cuws", "ours" becomes "aiurs"... Of course those accents are diminishing.... slowly but surely the South is becoming one bland southern dialect. Which is a shame, because the true Sussex accent is a good one! She-Ra, Princess Of Power
  • Score: 0

1:10pm Mon 4 Jan 10

cheezburger says...

You already are irrittating Tye.

I suggest you actually read the article before commenting. West Sussex accents are mentioned at the top of the article and at the bottom.

Incidentally that article has been edited since it was first written. Didnt mention East Sussex originally.
You already are irrittating Tye. I suggest you actually read the article before commenting. West Sussex accents are mentioned at the top of the article and at the bottom. Incidentally that article has been edited since it was first written. Didnt mention East Sussex originally. cheezburger
  • Score: 0

3:31pm Mon 4 Jan 10

Tye says...

cheezburger wrote:
You already are irrittating Tye. I suggest you actually read the article before commenting. West Sussex accents are mentioned at the top of the article and at the bottom. Incidentally that article has been edited since it was first written. Didnt mention East Sussex originally.
don't forget to tell us what your website will be called
[quote][p][bold]cheezburger[/bold] wrote: You already are irrittating Tye. I suggest you actually read the article before commenting. West Sussex accents are mentioned at the top of the article and at the bottom. Incidentally that article has been edited since it was first written. Didnt mention East Sussex originally.[/p][/quote]don't forget to tell us what your website will be called Tye
  • Score: 0

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