Buckley: It's not about the price tag

The Argus: Will Buckley has been in excellent form recently Will Buckley has been in excellent form recently

Will Buckley has sidestepped debate over his transfer market value and set his sights on helping Albion into the top six.

The three-goal Seagulls winger has been rated by manager Gus Poyet as better than Crystal Palace star Wilfried Zaha, who could play for England against Sweden tonight.

Buckley admits he was flattered to be valued in excess of £10 million by Poyet in The Argus recently.

But he is not getting involved in discussions as to who is the best player. Buckley said: “It gives me confidence if the gaffer thinks I’m worth that much. But I don’t really worry about things like that “I just want to get on the pitch, score goals and set goals up for the lads and hopefully this season we can get in the play-offs at least.”

Buckley became Albion’s first £1 million player when he signed from Watford in the summer of 2011. He revealed there has been a few jokes from team-mates about his current eight-figure price tag but added: “It was just a bit of banter.

“Hopefully I can prove I am worth that much but it is on the pitch that matters. I just want to get on there and do my best for Brighton.”

Comments (23)

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5:35pm Wed 14 Nov 12

saraman says...

I can't think of anything else it can be about Will. Every commodity has its price and football players are no exception. If you are sold Will for £10m you will pick up a cool £1m (10%). I would leave my job for that and get paid more elsewhere. Football is business like any other. Would be very sad to see you go all the same.
I can't think of anything else it can be about Will. Every commodity has its price and football players are no exception. If you are sold Will for £10m you will pick up a cool £1m (10%). I would leave my job for that and get paid more elsewhere. Football is business like any other. Would be very sad to see you go all the same. saraman

5:35pm Wed 14 Nov 12

WisdomSpeaks says...

Thought For The Day

"Most people fail in life not because they aim too high and miss, but because they aim too low and hit"
Thought For The Day "Most people fail in life not because they aim too high and miss, but because they aim too low and hit" WisdomSpeaks

5:39pm Wed 14 Nov 12

Alfie T says...

Hope all this talk of transfer value doesn't affect his performances, not sure it's the best move from Guss. Will seems a level headed fella, so I think he will just get on with doing what he's best at.
Hope all this talk of transfer value doesn't affect his performances, not sure it's the best move from Guss. Will seems a level headed fella, so I think he will just get on with doing what he's best at. Alfie T

5:43pm Wed 14 Nov 12

saraman says...

WisdomSpeaks wrote:
Thought For The Day "Most people fail in life not because they aim too high and miss, but because they aim too low and hit"
Like it Confuscus. Not sure if I spelt that right, I'm sure I will be corrected if not.
[quote][p][bold]WisdomSpeaks[/bold] wrote: Thought For The Day "Most people fail in life not because they aim too high and miss, but because they aim too low and hit"[/p][/quote]Like it Confuscus. Not sure if I spelt that right, I'm sure I will be corrected if not. saraman

5:57pm Wed 14 Nov 12

wiseman of hove says...

It was obvious from the opening match against Doncaster last season that he was something special. A constant puzzle as I and others often posted, as to why he did not feature more last season, particularly in the first few months. I doubt it has needed the manager to raise his profile - there must be a number of clubs who have been monitoring him for some time. The surprise is that no club, apparently, has tried to acquire him already. I'm just enjoying watching his wing play because I fear it will not be on display here for much longer.
It was obvious from the opening match against Doncaster last season that he was something special. A constant puzzle as I and others often posted, as to why he did not feature more last season, particularly in the first few months. I doubt it has needed the manager to raise his profile - there must be a number of clubs who have been monitoring him for some time. The surprise is that no club, apparently, has tried to acquire him already. I'm just enjoying watching his wing play because I fear it will not be on display here for much longer. wiseman of hove

6:01pm Wed 14 Nov 12

saraman says...

wiseman of hove wrote:
It was obvious from the opening match against Doncaster last season that he was something special. A constant puzzle as I and others often posted, as to why he did not feature more last season, particularly in the first few months. I doubt it has needed the manager to raise his profile - there must be a number of clubs who have been monitoring him for some time. The surprise is that no club, apparently, has tried to acquire him already. I'm just enjoying watching his wing play because I fear it will not be on display here for much longer.
Agree Wiseman, he will go in January and his fee will allow Gus to fill another piece of the jigsaw for a promotion push next season.
[quote][p][bold]wiseman of hove[/bold] wrote: It was obvious from the opening match against Doncaster last season that he was something special. A constant puzzle as I and others often posted, as to why he did not feature more last season, particularly in the first few months. I doubt it has needed the manager to raise his profile - there must be a number of clubs who have been monitoring him for some time. The surprise is that no club, apparently, has tried to acquire him already. I'm just enjoying watching his wing play because I fear it will not be on display here for much longer.[/p][/quote]Agree Wiseman, he will go in January and his fee will allow Gus to fill another piece of the jigsaw for a promotion push next season. saraman

6:50pm Wed 14 Nov 12

ShorehamBeachcomber says...

Now he's being scouted Gus plays him every game...
Now he's being scouted Gus plays him every game... ShorehamBeachcomber

7:12pm Wed 14 Nov 12

saraman says...

ShorehamBeachcomber wrote:
Now he's being scouted Gus plays him every game...
Of course, put him in the shop window with the highest price. Then do a deal.
[quote][p][bold]ShorehamBeachcomber[/bold] wrote: Now he's being scouted Gus plays him every game...[/p][/quote]Of course, put him in the shop window with the highest price. Then do a deal. saraman

8:02pm Wed 14 Nov 12

BHArulz says...

wiseman of hove wrote:
It was obvious from the opening match against Doncaster last season that he was something special. A constant puzzle as I and others often posted, as to why he did not feature more last season, particularly in the first few months. I doubt it has needed the manager to raise his profile - there must be a number of clubs who have been monitoring him for some time. The surprise is that no club, apparently, has tried to acquire him already. I'm just enjoying watching his wing play because I fear it will not be on display here for much longer.
Didn't he spend a lot of time that season sidelined with injuries, if I remember I think it was hamstrings. He won't be going anywhere this season. Don't get me wrong he is talented there is no doubting that bit certainly not so good to be worth 10 million. Just not quite the finished article yet.
[quote][p][bold]wiseman of hove[/bold] wrote: It was obvious from the opening match against Doncaster last season that he was something special. A constant puzzle as I and others often posted, as to why he did not feature more last season, particularly in the first few months. I doubt it has needed the manager to raise his profile - there must be a number of clubs who have been monitoring him for some time. The surprise is that no club, apparently, has tried to acquire him already. I'm just enjoying watching his wing play because I fear it will not be on display here for much longer.[/p][/quote]Didn't he spend a lot of time that season sidelined with injuries, if I remember I think it was hamstrings. He won't be going anywhere this season. Don't get me wrong he is talented there is no doubting that bit certainly not so good to be worth 10 million. Just not quite the finished article yet. BHArulz

8:18pm Wed 14 Nov 12

KeefyH44 says...

I know that it's an old fashioned virtue, but I still feel that loyalty matters. If he makes his mark, of course he could make more money, but even if he is on £5,000 pw, and I'm sure that he is on more, it's still around half a year's income for many in just two weeks, £250,000 a year! You can only drive one car at a time, live in one house at a time and although it is a short playing career, the opportunities are there for coaching, media etc at the end of his playing life. You only need enough to make it so that you can live comfortably and not have to worry about how to pay the next bill and that is not lack of ambition, money does not make you happy, but having sufficient gives you options is all.
I know that it's an old fashioned virtue, but I still feel that loyalty matters. If he makes his mark, of course he could make more money, but even if he is on £5,000 pw, and I'm sure that he is on more, it's still around half a year's income for many in just two weeks, £250,000 a year! You can only drive one car at a time, live in one house at a time and although it is a short playing career, the opportunities are there for coaching, media etc at the end of his playing life. You only need enough to make it so that you can live comfortably and not have to worry about how to pay the next bill and that is not lack of ambition, money does not make you happy, but having sufficient gives you options is all. KeefyH44

9:40pm Wed 14 Nov 12

9 of us says...

Jeus H Christ.

More absolute garbish from the Argus.
Just look at the list of recent headlines concerning Albion. Not one story of any relevant substance.
Tell supporters something they don't know and something original.
Investigate and do research and you can then surprise us. Me alone, if not anyone else.
Jeus H Christ. More absolute garbish from the Argus. Just look at the list of recent headlines concerning Albion. Not one story of any relevant substance. Tell supporters something they don't know and something original. Investigate and do research and you can then surprise us. Me alone, if not anyone else. 9 of us

9:58pm Wed 14 Nov 12

Baldseagull says...

WisdomSpeaks wrote:
Thought For The Day

"Most people fail in life not because they aim too high and miss, but because they aim too low and hit"
How have you failed if you hit what you aim at?
[quote][p][bold]WisdomSpeaks[/bold] wrote: Thought For The Day "Most people fail in life not because they aim too high and miss, but because they aim too low and hit"[/p][/quote]How have you failed if you hit what you aim at? Baldseagull

10:02pm Wed 14 Nov 12

Alfie T says...

Baldseagull wrote:
WisdomSpeaks wrote:
Thought For The Day

"Most people fail in life not because they aim too high and miss, but because they aim too low and hit"
How have you failed if you hit what you aim at?
Yes,I think his attempt at philosophy needs a bit of work.
[quote][p][bold]Baldseagull[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]WisdomSpeaks[/bold] wrote: Thought For The Day "Most people fail in life not because they aim too high and miss, but because they aim too low and hit"[/p][/quote]How have you failed if you hit what you aim at?[/p][/quote]Yes,I think his attempt at philosophy needs a bit of work. Alfie T

8:54am Thu 15 Nov 12

The Real Ryfish says...

Baldseagull wrote:
WisdomSpeaks wrote:
Thought For The Day

"Most people fail in life not because they aim too high and miss, but because they aim too low and hit"
How have you failed if you hit what you aim at?
Because you aimed too low, ie lacked ambition. It's a well known piece of philosophy. Hackneyed perhaps, but a point well made.
[quote][p][bold]Baldseagull[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]WisdomSpeaks[/bold] wrote: Thought For The Day "Most people fail in life not because they aim too high and miss, but because they aim too low and hit"[/p][/quote]How have you failed if you hit what you aim at?[/p][/quote]Because you aimed too low, ie lacked ambition. It's a well known piece of philosophy. Hackneyed perhaps, but a point well made. The Real Ryfish

9:22am Thu 15 Nov 12

pjwilk says...

Zaha was useless in the England team last night wouldnt give you a tenner for him on that form.Buckley would have done a lot better.
Zaha was useless in the England team last night wouldnt give you a tenner for him on that form.Buckley would have done a lot better. pjwilk

11:27am Thu 15 Nov 12

fratsomrover says...

Will's our best player and is bound to attract interest. He's has so much ability and I dont think we get the best out of him. He engineers space and makes darting runs which frequently dont get spotted by team mates and I worry he might get frustrated at times. If we look like getting into the top 6 he's more likely to give his all and stay, but if he feels we'll fail again then I think he will be looking at other offers. I'm sure he'd love to be playing in The Premiership and if he doesn't think he'll be doing that with us, then he'll go to someone who is. For sure he's premiership class
Will's our best player and is bound to attract interest. He's has so much ability and I dont think we get the best out of him. He engineers space and makes darting runs which frequently dont get spotted by team mates and I worry he might get frustrated at times. If we look like getting into the top 6 he's more likely to give his all and stay, but if he feels we'll fail again then I think he will be looking at other offers. I'm sure he'd love to be playing in The Premiership and if he doesn't think he'll be doing that with us, then he'll go to someone who is. For sure he's premiership class fratsomrover

1:15pm Thu 15 Nov 12

VegasSeagull says...

Buckley tells us that it is not about the money, and that is good to hear from him, but at the end of the day, sadly, it is about the money.

Brighton could not afford to turn down a 9 million profit and the player, well could he really say no knowing that his club are saying yes. I really don't see a 10 million offer coming in for Buckley, maybe 5 or 6 if he continues to impress but 10 million seems over the top to me and I am sure it does to him too.
Buckley tells us that it is not about the money, and that is good to hear from him, but at the end of the day, sadly, it is about the money. Brighton could not afford to turn down a 9 million profit and the player, well could he really say no knowing that his club are saying yes. I really don't see a 10 million offer coming in for Buckley, maybe 5 or 6 if he continues to impress but 10 million seems over the top to me and I am sure it does to him too. VegasSeagull

8:49pm Thu 15 Nov 12

Sacre Bleu says...

KeefyH44 wrote:
I know that it's an old fashioned virtue, but I still feel that loyalty matters. If he makes his mark, of course he could make more money, but even if he is on £5,000 pw, and I'm sure that he is on more, it's still around half a year's income for many in just two weeks, £250,000 a year! You can only drive one car at a time, live in one house at a time and although it is a short playing career, the opportunities are there for coaching, media etc at the end of his playing life. You only need enough to make it so that you can live comfortably and not have to worry about how to pay the next bill and that is not lack of ambition, money does not make you happy, but having sufficient gives you options is all.
Totally agree with the sentiments in your post. There is something seriously wrong with a society in which an admittedly gifted player "earns" in one month what a skilled worker could expect to receive in a working lifetime, - always assuming he is never laid off or otherwise unemployed. I am thinking specifically of Nicholas Anelka currently under contract in China on 250k pw, but he is not unique by any means. Unfortunately we judge people by what they receive rather than what they give. Old fashioned maybe but the money-go-round that now governs football is slowly but surely destroying the beautiful game. Meantime, as far as one can judge at a distance, Buckley seems to be a level-headed lad who simply enjoys playing - long may it continue.
[quote][p][bold]KeefyH44[/bold] wrote: I know that it's an old fashioned virtue, but I still feel that loyalty matters. If he makes his mark, of course he could make more money, but even if he is on £5,000 pw, and I'm sure that he is on more, it's still around half a year's income for many in just two weeks, £250,000 a year! You can only drive one car at a time, live in one house at a time and although it is a short playing career, the opportunities are there for coaching, media etc at the end of his playing life. You only need enough to make it so that you can live comfortably and not have to worry about how to pay the next bill and that is not lack of ambition, money does not make you happy, but having sufficient gives you options is all.[/p][/quote]Totally agree with the sentiments in your post. There is something seriously wrong with a society in which an admittedly gifted player "earns" in one month what a skilled worker could expect to receive in a working lifetime, - always assuming he is never laid off or otherwise unemployed. I am thinking specifically of Nicholas Anelka currently under contract in China on 250k pw, but he is not unique by any means. Unfortunately we judge people by what they receive rather than what they give. Old fashioned maybe but the money-go-round that now governs football is slowly but surely destroying the beautiful game. Meantime, as far as one can judge at a distance, Buckley seems to be a level-headed lad who simply enjoys playing - long may it continue. Sacre Bleu

10:48pm Thu 15 Nov 12

VegasSeagull says...

Sacre Bleu wrote:
KeefyH44 wrote: I know that it's an old fashioned virtue, but I still feel that loyalty matters. If he makes his mark, of course he could make more money, but even if he is on £5,000 pw, and I'm sure that he is on more, it's still around half a year's income for many in just two weeks, £250,000 a year! You can only drive one car at a time, live in one house at a time and although it is a short playing career, the opportunities are there for coaching, media etc at the end of his playing life. You only need enough to make it so that you can live comfortably and not have to worry about how to pay the next bill and that is not lack of ambition, money does not make you happy, but having sufficient gives you options is all.
Totally agree with the sentiments in your post. There is something seriously wrong with a society in which an admittedly gifted player "earns" in one month what a skilled worker could expect to receive in a working lifetime, - always assuming he is never laid off or otherwise unemployed. I am thinking specifically of Nicholas Anelka currently under contract in China on 250k pw, but he is not unique by any means. Unfortunately we judge people by what they receive rather than what they give. Old fashioned maybe but the money-go-round that now governs football is slowly but surely destroying the beautiful game. Meantime, as far as one can judge at a distance, Buckley seems to be a level-headed lad who simply enjoys playing - long may it continue.
Beckham's first contract with with Galaxy was for five years, his payment was reported to be 50 million, reported in the UK as well as here in the USA.

The club, over the five years, has got most of the money back in higher commercial fees, gate reciepts, sponsorship deals and tv rights. My point is, very often a high paid player does more than just increase his bank balance. The arrival of Beckham sparked a massive increase in interest in the MLS, all of the clubs have benfitted by his arrival.

If Beckham is an example of what just one player can do in America who knows what a few could do in China, the game could grow even bigger there than it is in the USA.

There are many countries that could come inot the fold. India has football clubs but the game is not big, many of the african countries could expand on their existing program.
It's the players that expand the game, the heroes of football and these heroes deserve evey penny they get.. , , . .
[quote][p][bold]Sacre Bleu[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]KeefyH44[/bold] wrote: I know that it's an old fashioned virtue, but I still feel that loyalty matters. If he makes his mark, of course he could make more money, but even if he is on £5,000 pw, and I'm sure that he is on more, it's still around half a year's income for many in just two weeks, £250,000 a year! You can only drive one car at a time, live in one house at a time and although it is a short playing career, the opportunities are there for coaching, media etc at the end of his playing life. You only need enough to make it so that you can live comfortably and not have to worry about how to pay the next bill and that is not lack of ambition, money does not make you happy, but having sufficient gives you options is all.[/p][/quote]Totally agree with the sentiments in your post. There is something seriously wrong with a society in which an admittedly gifted player "earns" in one month what a skilled worker could expect to receive in a working lifetime, - always assuming he is never laid off or otherwise unemployed. I am thinking specifically of Nicholas Anelka currently under contract in China on 250k pw, but he is not unique by any means. Unfortunately we judge people by what they receive rather than what they give. Old fashioned maybe but the money-go-round that now governs football is slowly but surely destroying the beautiful game. Meantime, as far as one can judge at a distance, Buckley seems to be a level-headed lad who simply enjoys playing - long may it continue.[/p][/quote]Beckham's first contract with with Galaxy was for five years, his payment was reported to be 50 million, reported in the UK as well as here in the USA. The club, over the five years, has got most of the money back in higher commercial fees, gate reciepts, sponsorship deals and tv rights. My point is, very often a high paid player does more than just increase his bank balance. The arrival of Beckham sparked a massive increase in interest in the MLS, all of the clubs have benfitted by his arrival. If Beckham is an example of what just one player can do in America who knows what a few could do in China, the game could grow even bigger there than it is in the USA. There are many countries that could come inot the fold. India has football clubs but the game is not big, many of the african countries could expand on their existing program. It's the players that expand the game, the heroes of football and these heroes deserve evey penny they get.. , , . . VegasSeagull

12:56pm Fri 16 Nov 12

Sacre Bleu says...

VegasSeagull wrote:
Sacre Bleu wrote:
KeefyH44 wrote: I know that it's an old fashioned virtue, but I still feel that loyalty matters. If he makes his mark, of course he could make more money, but even if he is on £5,000 pw, and I'm sure that he is on more, it's still around half a year's income for many in just two weeks, £250,000 a year! You can only drive one car at a time, live in one house at a time and although it is a short playing career, the opportunities are there for coaching, media etc at the end of his playing life. You only need enough to make it so that you can live comfortably and not have to worry about how to pay the next bill and that is not lack of ambition, money does not make you happy, but having sufficient gives you options is all.
Totally agree with the sentiments in your post. There is something seriously wrong with a society in which an admittedly gifted player "earns" in one month what a skilled worker could expect to receive in a working lifetime, - always assuming he is never laid off or otherwise unemployed. I am thinking specifically of Nicholas Anelka currently under contract in China on 250k pw, but he is not unique by any means. Unfortunately we judge people by what they receive rather than what they give. Old fashioned maybe but the money-go-round that now governs football is slowly but surely destroying the beautiful game. Meantime, as far as one can judge at a distance, Buckley seems to be a level-headed lad who simply enjoys playing - long may it continue.
Beckham's first contract with with Galaxy was for five years, his payment was reported to be 50 million, reported in the UK as well as here in the USA.

The club, over the five years, has got most of the money back in higher commercial fees, gate reciepts, sponsorship deals and tv rights. My point is, very often a high paid player does more than just increase his bank balance. The arrival of Beckham sparked a massive increase in interest in the MLS, all of the clubs have benfitted by his arrival.

If Beckham is an example of what just one player can do in America who knows what a few could do in China, the game could grow even bigger there than it is in the USA.

There are many countries that could come inot the fold. India has football clubs but the game is not big, many of the african countries could expand on their existing program.
It's the players that expand the game, the heroes of football and these heroes deserve evey penny they get.. , , . .
Much of what you say I agree with. The star performers in every sport generate interest and stimulate development in their own particular sphere. That’s indisputable.

My quarrel is to do with the level of remuneration of the Beckhams and the Annelkas which in my personal opinion verges on the obscene. To suggest that any individual is “worth every penny” without limit is to miss the point made in the previous post . It is the accumulation of massive wealth far beyond the need, or indeed capacity, of an individual to live a rich and fulfilling life that is the issue.

We’ve heard similar arguments in support of mega-bonuses to bankers and CEOs of multinational companies on the grounds that they too are “worth every penny” as wealth creators whose unique and irreplaceable services can only be retained by massive remunerative reward. In fact as we have seen recently this is complete b******t. Witness the incompetence verging on criminality that all too frequently surfaces after irreversible damage has been done. And whereas a redundant worker –a humble bank clerk for instance - is more usually consigned to the employment scrap heap, a deficient “top manager” gets a golden parachute as compensation for failure and moves serenely on to fleece the next milch cow, mixed metaphor notwithstanding.

My idols in sport were the Tom Finneys and the Ferenc Puskas’s, the Zatopecks and the Landys, the Hoads and the Drobneys, the Huttons and the Lindwalls. They were my inspiration, and acting out roles of our heroes is what I and countless other kids spent our time doing in the streets of our homes.

Yes of course, the world has moved on but at what price if childhood idealism and wonderment is conditioned by how many Ferraris or yachts stardom brings in its wake.

In case this sounds like sour grapes or envy, let me say I’ve had a rich and varied life and still wake up each morning with a feeling of anticipation for what the day may offer. Well maybe not EVERY morning. And to be honest I never did manage to emulate Nat Lofthouse in the penalty area but that’s another story……………

End of sermon.
[quote][p][bold]VegasSeagull[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Sacre Bleu[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]KeefyH44[/bold] wrote: I know that it's an old fashioned virtue, but I still feel that loyalty matters. If he makes his mark, of course he could make more money, but even if he is on £5,000 pw, and I'm sure that he is on more, it's still around half a year's income for many in just two weeks, £250,000 a year! You can only drive one car at a time, live in one house at a time and although it is a short playing career, the opportunities are there for coaching, media etc at the end of his playing life. You only need enough to make it so that you can live comfortably and not have to worry about how to pay the next bill and that is not lack of ambition, money does not make you happy, but having sufficient gives you options is all.[/p][/quote]Totally agree with the sentiments in your post. There is something seriously wrong with a society in which an admittedly gifted player "earns" in one month what a skilled worker could expect to receive in a working lifetime, - always assuming he is never laid off or otherwise unemployed. I am thinking specifically of Nicholas Anelka currently under contract in China on 250k pw, but he is not unique by any means. Unfortunately we judge people by what they receive rather than what they give. Old fashioned maybe but the money-go-round that now governs football is slowly but surely destroying the beautiful game. Meantime, as far as one can judge at a distance, Buckley seems to be a level-headed lad who simply enjoys playing - long may it continue.[/p][/quote]Beckham's first contract with with Galaxy was for five years, his payment was reported to be 50 million, reported in the UK as well as here in the USA. The club, over the five years, has got most of the money back in higher commercial fees, gate reciepts, sponsorship deals and tv rights. My point is, very often a high paid player does more than just increase his bank balance. The arrival of Beckham sparked a massive increase in interest in the MLS, all of the clubs have benfitted by his arrival. If Beckham is an example of what just one player can do in America who knows what a few could do in China, the game could grow even bigger there than it is in the USA. There are many countries that could come inot the fold. India has football clubs but the game is not big, many of the african countries could expand on their existing program. It's the players that expand the game, the heroes of football and these heroes deserve evey penny they get.. , , . .[/p][/quote]Much of what you say I agree with. The star performers in every sport generate interest and stimulate development in their own particular sphere. That’s indisputable. My quarrel is to do with the level of remuneration of the Beckhams and the Annelkas which in my personal opinion verges on the obscene. To suggest that any individual is “worth every penny” without limit is to miss the point made in the previous post . It is the accumulation of massive wealth far beyond the need, or indeed capacity, of an individual to live a rich and fulfilling life that is the issue. We’ve heard similar arguments in support of mega-bonuses to bankers and CEOs of multinational companies on the grounds that they too are “worth every penny” as wealth creators whose unique and irreplaceable services can only be retained by massive remunerative reward. In fact as we have seen recently this is complete b******t. Witness the incompetence verging on criminality that all too frequently surfaces after irreversible damage has been done. And whereas a redundant worker –a humble bank clerk for instance - is more usually consigned to the employment scrap heap, a deficient “top manager” gets a golden parachute as compensation for failure and moves serenely on to fleece the next milch cow, mixed metaphor notwithstanding. My idols in sport were the Tom Finneys and the Ferenc Puskas’s, the Zatopecks and the Landys, the Hoads and the Drobneys, the Huttons and the Lindwalls. They were my inspiration, and acting out roles of our heroes is what I and countless other kids spent our time doing in the streets of our homes. Yes of course, the world has moved on but at what price if childhood idealism and wonderment is conditioned by how many Ferraris or yachts stardom brings in its wake. In case this sounds like sour grapes or envy, let me say I’ve had a rich and varied life and still wake up each morning with a feeling of anticipation for what the day may offer. Well maybe not EVERY morning. And to be honest I never did manage to emulate Nat Lofthouse in the penalty area but that’s another story…………… End of sermon. Sacre Bleu

12:56pm Fri 16 Nov 12

Sacre Bleu says...

VegasSeagull wrote:
Sacre Bleu wrote:
KeefyH44 wrote: I know that it's an old fashioned virtue, but I still feel that loyalty matters. If he makes his mark, of course he could make more money, but even if he is on £5,000 pw, and I'm sure that he is on more, it's still around half a year's income for many in just two weeks, £250,000 a year! You can only drive one car at a time, live in one house at a time and although it is a short playing career, the opportunities are there for coaching, media etc at the end of his playing life. You only need enough to make it so that you can live comfortably and not have to worry about how to pay the next bill and that is not lack of ambition, money does not make you happy, but having sufficient gives you options is all.
Totally agree with the sentiments in your post. There is something seriously wrong with a society in which an admittedly gifted player "earns" in one month what a skilled worker could expect to receive in a working lifetime, - always assuming he is never laid off or otherwise unemployed. I am thinking specifically of Nicholas Anelka currently under contract in China on 250k pw, but he is not unique by any means. Unfortunately we judge people by what they receive rather than what they give. Old fashioned maybe but the money-go-round that now governs football is slowly but surely destroying the beautiful game. Meantime, as far as one can judge at a distance, Buckley seems to be a level-headed lad who simply enjoys playing - long may it continue.
Beckham's first contract with with Galaxy was for five years, his payment was reported to be 50 million, reported in the UK as well as here in the USA.

The club, over the five years, has got most of the money back in higher commercial fees, gate reciepts, sponsorship deals and tv rights. My point is, very often a high paid player does more than just increase his bank balance. The arrival of Beckham sparked a massive increase in interest in the MLS, all of the clubs have benfitted by his arrival.

If Beckham is an example of what just one player can do in America who knows what a few could do in China, the game could grow even bigger there than it is in the USA.

There are many countries that could come inot the fold. India has football clubs but the game is not big, many of the african countries could expand on their existing program.
It's the players that expand the game, the heroes of football and these heroes deserve evey penny they get.. , , . .
Much of what you say I agree with. The star performers in every sport generate interest and stimulate development in their own particular sphere. That’s indisputable.

My quarrel is to do with the level of remuneration of the Beckhams and the Annelkas which in my personal opinion verges on the obscene. To suggest that any individual is “worth every penny” without limit is to miss the point made in the previous post . It is the accumulation of massive wealth far beyond the need, or indeed capacity, of an individual to live a rich and fulfilling life that is the issue.

We’ve heard similar arguments in support of mega-bonuses to bankers and CEOs of multinational companies on the grounds that they too are “worth every penny” as wealth creators whose unique and irreplaceable services can only be retained by massive remunerative reward. In fact as we have seen recently this is complete b******t. Witness the incompetence verging on criminality that all too frequently surfaces after irreversible damage has been done. And whereas a redundant worker –a humble bank clerk for instance - is more usually consigned to the employment scrap heap, a deficient “top manager” gets a golden parachute as compensation for failure and moves serenely on to fleece the next milch cow, mixed metaphor notwithstanding.

My idols in sport were the Tom Finneys and the Ferenc Puskas’s, the Zatopecks and the Landys, the Hoads and the Drobneys, the Huttons and the Lindwalls. They were my inspiration, and acting out roles of our heroes is what I and countless other kids spent our time doing in the streets of our homes.

Yes of course, the world has moved on but at what price if childhood idealism and wonderment is conditioned by how many Ferraris or yachts stardom brings in its wake.

In case this sounds like sour grapes or envy, let me say I’ve had a rich and varied life and still wake up each morning with a feeling of anticipation for what the day may offer. Well maybe not EVERY morning. And to be honest I never did manage to emulate Nat Lofthouse in the penalty area but that’s another story……………

End of sermon.
[quote][p][bold]VegasSeagull[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Sacre Bleu[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]KeefyH44[/bold] wrote: I know that it's an old fashioned virtue, but I still feel that loyalty matters. If he makes his mark, of course he could make more money, but even if he is on £5,000 pw, and I'm sure that he is on more, it's still around half a year's income for many in just two weeks, £250,000 a year! You can only drive one car at a time, live in one house at a time and although it is a short playing career, the opportunities are there for coaching, media etc at the end of his playing life. You only need enough to make it so that you can live comfortably and not have to worry about how to pay the next bill and that is not lack of ambition, money does not make you happy, but having sufficient gives you options is all.[/p][/quote]Totally agree with the sentiments in your post. There is something seriously wrong with a society in which an admittedly gifted player "earns" in one month what a skilled worker could expect to receive in a working lifetime, - always assuming he is never laid off or otherwise unemployed. I am thinking specifically of Nicholas Anelka currently under contract in China on 250k pw, but he is not unique by any means. Unfortunately we judge people by what they receive rather than what they give. Old fashioned maybe but the money-go-round that now governs football is slowly but surely destroying the beautiful game. Meantime, as far as one can judge at a distance, Buckley seems to be a level-headed lad who simply enjoys playing - long may it continue.[/p][/quote]Beckham's first contract with with Galaxy was for five years, his payment was reported to be 50 million, reported in the UK as well as here in the USA. The club, over the five years, has got most of the money back in higher commercial fees, gate reciepts, sponsorship deals and tv rights. My point is, very often a high paid player does more than just increase his bank balance. The arrival of Beckham sparked a massive increase in interest in the MLS, all of the clubs have benfitted by his arrival. If Beckham is an example of what just one player can do in America who knows what a few could do in China, the game could grow even bigger there than it is in the USA. There are many countries that could come inot the fold. India has football clubs but the game is not big, many of the african countries could expand on their existing program. It's the players that expand the game, the heroes of football and these heroes deserve evey penny they get.. , , . .[/p][/quote]Much of what you say I agree with. The star performers in every sport generate interest and stimulate development in their own particular sphere. That’s indisputable. My quarrel is to do with the level of remuneration of the Beckhams and the Annelkas which in my personal opinion verges on the obscene. To suggest that any individual is “worth every penny” without limit is to miss the point made in the previous post . It is the accumulation of massive wealth far beyond the need, or indeed capacity, of an individual to live a rich and fulfilling life that is the issue. We’ve heard similar arguments in support of mega-bonuses to bankers and CEOs of multinational companies on the grounds that they too are “worth every penny” as wealth creators whose unique and irreplaceable services can only be retained by massive remunerative reward. In fact as we have seen recently this is complete b******t. Witness the incompetence verging on criminality that all too frequently surfaces after irreversible damage has been done. And whereas a redundant worker –a humble bank clerk for instance - is more usually consigned to the employment scrap heap, a deficient “top manager” gets a golden parachute as compensation for failure and moves serenely on to fleece the next milch cow, mixed metaphor notwithstanding. My idols in sport were the Tom Finneys and the Ferenc Puskas’s, the Zatopecks and the Landys, the Hoads and the Drobneys, the Huttons and the Lindwalls. They were my inspiration, and acting out roles of our heroes is what I and countless other kids spent our time doing in the streets of our homes. Yes of course, the world has moved on but at what price if childhood idealism and wonderment is conditioned by how many Ferraris or yachts stardom brings in its wake. In case this sounds like sour grapes or envy, let me say I’ve had a rich and varied life and still wake up each morning with a feeling of anticipation for what the day may offer. Well maybe not EVERY morning. And to be honest I never did manage to emulate Nat Lofthouse in the penalty area but that’s another story…………… End of sermon. Sacre Bleu

4:26pm Fri 16 Nov 12

VegasSeagull says...

Sacre Bleu.

If we follow your logic, and I do see your point, Beckham need not have gone to America, he could have retired after all he had more money than he would ever spend at that time.
Beckham's arrival in the MLS was always going to create a huge increase in revenue both for the club he signed for and for those he would play against. If, as you suggest, a person should be paid according to their impact upon those that employ him/her, then Beckham's wages would seem justified.

During the few years he (Beckham,) has been over here the gates at all grounds have increased, increased by more thna they were prior to his arrival. During his down time Beckham can often be seen working with team mates outside of normal training hours, he is a teacher as much as he is a player.

The clubs over here, just the same as in the UK, are very involved in their communities, they spend and give out a lot of dollars. The more a club takes in the more a club can give out.
Kean has very quickly become a huge star in the soccor world of America, he too is having an impact on the youth and fellow players. I really don't think that it can be over stated what they have brought to the game here and players like them in several states.

I agree that failure should not be rewarded but success should be. At the end of the day it is not Beckham and the likes demanding certain amounts it's the clubs offering it and the player simply saying yes.

Bridge is a great defender but being a defender is not that glamorous to a young kid in America, they all want to be a striker or, 'bend it like Beckham.' If and when Bridge does come over he will have a huge impact on the youth, he will spawn an interest that does not exist with the kids. This all goes to improving the game here and that is worth paying for.

Changes such as I have mentioned are happening all over the world with big names uprooting to live away from the UK. What price would you ask for to leave all that you know and love about Britain to go and live in China or Korea. Family and friends all left behind and a whole new culture to try and fit into. I did it and it is not easy, even now I still feel homesick very often, and I don't get to see Brighton play, that alone should be worth soemthing extra in my pocket.
Sacre Bleu. If we follow your logic, and I do see your point, Beckham need not have gone to America, he could have retired after all he had more money than he would ever spend at that time. Beckham's arrival in the MLS was always going to create a huge increase in revenue both for the club he signed for and for those he would play against. If, as you suggest, a person should be paid according to their impact upon those that employ him/her, then Beckham's wages would seem justified. During the few years he (Beckham,) has been over here the gates at all grounds have increased, increased by more thna they were prior to his arrival. During his down time Beckham can often be seen working with team mates outside of normal training hours, he is a teacher as much as he is a player. The clubs over here, just the same as in the UK, are very involved in their communities, they spend and give out a lot of dollars. The more a club takes in the more a club can give out. Kean has very quickly become a huge star in the soccor world of America, he too is having an impact on the youth and fellow players. I really don't think that it can be over stated what they have brought to the game here and players like them in several states. I agree that failure should not be rewarded but success should be. At the end of the day it is not Beckham and the likes demanding certain amounts it's the clubs offering it and the player simply saying yes. Bridge is a great defender but being a defender is not that glamorous to a young kid in America, they all want to be a striker or, 'bend it like Beckham.' If and when Bridge does come over he will have a huge impact on the youth, he will spawn an interest that does not exist with the kids. This all goes to improving the game here and that is worth paying for. Changes such as I have mentioned are happening all over the world with big names uprooting to live away from the UK. What price would you ask for to leave all that you know and love about Britain to go and live in China or Korea. Family and friends all left behind and a whole new culture to try and fit into. I did it and it is not easy, even now I still feel homesick very often, and I don't get to see Brighton play, that alone should be worth soemthing extra in my pocket. VegasSeagull

5:08pm Fri 16 Nov 12

Sacre Bleu says...

VegasSeagull wrote:
Sacre Bleu.

If we follow your logic, and I do see your point, Beckham need not have gone to America, he could have retired after all he had more money than he would ever spend at that time.
Beckham's arrival in the MLS was always going to create a huge increase in revenue both for the club he signed for and for those he would play against. If, as you suggest, a person should be paid according to their impact upon those that employ him/her, then Beckham's wages would seem justified.

During the few years he (Beckham,) has been over here the gates at all grounds have increased, increased by more thna they were prior to his arrival. During his down time Beckham can often be seen working with team mates outside of normal training hours, he is a teacher as much as he is a player.

The clubs over here, just the same as in the UK, are very involved in their communities, they spend and give out a lot of dollars. The more a club takes in the more a club can give out.
Kean has very quickly become a huge star in the soccor world of America, he too is having an impact on the youth and fellow players. I really don't think that it can be over stated what they have brought to the game here and players like them in several states.

I agree that failure should not be rewarded but success should be. At the end of the day it is not Beckham and the likes demanding certain amounts it's the clubs offering it and the player simply saying yes.

Bridge is a great defender but being a defender is not that glamorous to a young kid in America, they all want to be a striker or, 'bend it like Beckham.' If and when Bridge does come over he will have a huge impact on the youth, he will spawn an interest that does not exist with the kids. This all goes to improving the game here and that is worth paying for.

Changes such as I have mentioned are happening all over the world with big names uprooting to live away from the UK. What price would you ask for to leave all that you know and love about Britain to go and live in China or Korea. Family and friends all left behind and a whole new culture to try and fit into. I did it and it is not easy, even now I still feel homesick very often, and I don't get to see Brighton play, that alone should be worth soemthing extra in my pocket.
As it happens Vegas, I live in France and have done so quite happily for 20 years. If I wasn't, I wouldn't be here. Presumably you made the decision to live in the US of your own accord so I'm not sure what your last paragraph means in the context of the issue I thought we were debating. I've already acknowledged the role players like Beckham fulfill in promoting the game. And I certainly wasn't arguing that he shouldn't have gone to the States. But does that really warrant paying 50 million to somebody who by your own admission has already got more money than he could spend in several lifetimes? There are such things as unpaid ambassadors you know. Geldoff for example. Talent is a gift which should not always carry a whopping great price tag. So I stick with Keefy's remarks which started this exchange.
[quote][p][bold]VegasSeagull[/bold] wrote: Sacre Bleu. If we follow your logic, and I do see your point, Beckham need not have gone to America, he could have retired after all he had more money than he would ever spend at that time. Beckham's arrival in the MLS was always going to create a huge increase in revenue both for the club he signed for and for those he would play against. If, as you suggest, a person should be paid according to their impact upon those that employ him/her, then Beckham's wages would seem justified. During the few years he (Beckham,) has been over here the gates at all grounds have increased, increased by more thna they were prior to his arrival. During his down time Beckham can often be seen working with team mates outside of normal training hours, he is a teacher as much as he is a player. The clubs over here, just the same as in the UK, are very involved in their communities, they spend and give out a lot of dollars. The more a club takes in the more a club can give out. Kean has very quickly become a huge star in the soccor world of America, he too is having an impact on the youth and fellow players. I really don't think that it can be over stated what they have brought to the game here and players like them in several states. I agree that failure should not be rewarded but success should be. At the end of the day it is not Beckham and the likes demanding certain amounts it's the clubs offering it and the player simply saying yes. Bridge is a great defender but being a defender is not that glamorous to a young kid in America, they all want to be a striker or, 'bend it like Beckham.' If and when Bridge does come over he will have a huge impact on the youth, he will spawn an interest that does not exist with the kids. This all goes to improving the game here and that is worth paying for. Changes such as I have mentioned are happening all over the world with big names uprooting to live away from the UK. What price would you ask for to leave all that you know and love about Britain to go and live in China or Korea. Family and friends all left behind and a whole new culture to try and fit into. I did it and it is not easy, even now I still feel homesick very often, and I don't get to see Brighton play, that alone should be worth soemthing extra in my pocket.[/p][/quote]As it happens Vegas, I live in France and have done so quite happily for 20 years. If I wasn't, I wouldn't be here. Presumably you made the decision to live in the US of your own accord so I'm not sure what your last paragraph means in the context of the issue I thought we were debating. I've already acknowledged the role players like Beckham fulfill in promoting the game. And I certainly wasn't arguing that he shouldn't have gone to the States. But does that really warrant paying 50 million to somebody who by your own admission has already got more money than he could spend in several lifetimes? There are such things as unpaid ambassadors you know. Geldoff for example. Talent is a gift which should not always carry a whopping great price tag. So I stick with Keefy's remarks which started this exchange. Sacre Bleu

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