DOZENS of vulnerable people have been evicted from emergency housing in the past year, The Argus can reveal.

In the year leading up to March, 156 residents in temporary accommodation in Brighton and Hove were evicted, according to figures obtained by Green housing spokesman Councillor David Gibson.

Of those, 40 were not re-housed.

Council statistics for April 2018 to March 2019 show 39 emergency housing residents were evicted. That means the number of evictions has seemingly risen by 400 per cent year on year, an increase Cllr Gibson branded “alarming”.

People are placed in emergency housing by Brighton and Hove City Council if they are at risk of homelessness.

But the blocks are owned by private companies paid by the council to house vulnerable residents. They can evict tenants as a “last resort” provided they consult the city first.

The Argus: Kendal Court in Newhaven is one such temporary housing block used by Brighton and Hove City CouncilKendal Court in Newhaven is one such temporary housing block used by Brighton and Hove City Council

Cllr Gibson said evicting temporary housing residents “sets people further back” and can sometimes leave them on the streets.

“We know there are often many issues lying behind reasons for evictions,” he said.

“But we cannot fail to acknowledge that eviction sets people further back and sometimes leaves people on the streets, a place we know puts people more at risk of further harm, poor health and vulnerability.

“It is clear too that some landlords are evicting a lot more homeless people than others.

“We are pressing for the next housing committee to scrutinise more deeply the large reported rise in evictions and the private landlords which are evicting so many homeless people.

“At a recent housing committee meeting I was told that new figures on evictions from emergency and temporary accommodation were ‘more robust’. This is alarming, particularly if the reason for this is that figures previously reported to committee were badly wrong.”

The Argus: Cllr Gibson feared some of those evicted from temporary accommodation could become homeless again. Photo: Yui Mok/PACllr Gibson feared some of those evicted from temporary accommodation could become homeless again. Photo: Yui Mok/PA

A breakdown of the figures shows 46 people were evicted from “spot-purchased” housing quickly bought by the city council.

Forty four tenants living in housing owned by Helgor Trading were evicted last year, as were 38 living in properties owned by Baron Homes.

Colgate and Gray evicted 25 tenants last year, while Moretons evicted just four.

But city council housing chief Councillor Gill Williams said eviction numbers had only risen because a more accurate reporting system has been introduced.

“Everyone evicted is helped to find alternative accommodation where possible,” she said.

Have you been evicted from temporary accommodation recently? Have you had a bad experience while living in emergency housing? Email samuel.brooke@theargus.co.uk.