Plans have been announced by the Government for the creation of 75 new free schools and sixth forms, which will mean 14,000 extra school places for children will be opened up.

In 55 Education Investment Areas identified in the Levelling Up White Paper, councils will be prioritised for up to 15 new mainstream schools, including standalone sixth forms.

The first of a new wave of up to 60 special and alternative provision (AP) free schools will open from September 2025, creating 4,500 new school places.

The AP schools will keep pupils who have been excluded or at risk of exclusion engaged with their education, as well as offering behavioural and mental health support, the Government said.

The Argus: Standalone sixth forms will be part of the levelling up education agenda (PA)Standalone sixth forms will be part of the levelling up education agenda (PA)

The Department for Education said that the school places build on commitments made in the levelling up and schools white papers, as well as the special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) and AP green papers, aiming to end a “postcode lottery” for pupils with special educational needs.

Education Secretary Nadhim Zahawi said: “All children have the right to a high-quality education. Parents should feel confident that their local school works for their child, no matter where they live or their ability.

“From mainstream education which can provide for every need, to specialist teachers and equipment in tailored settings, our new schools across the country will continue to make sure that every child, in every corner of the country, gets the support they need to succeed.”

Julie McCulloch, policy director at the Association of School and College Leaders, said that while headteachers welcomed the creation of new school and sixth form places, “we would urge the Government against creating super-selective standalone sixth forms”.

“As the chair of the Social Mobility Commission, Katharine Birbalsingh, said on Thursday in her inaugural speech, social mobility should not be just about making elite pathways for a few but should work for a wider range of people.

“The danger of super-selective sixth forms is that they will simply take the most academically able young people from existing sixth form provision with consequent damage to those institutions and a demoralising impact on other young people who do not make the cut,” she said.