The ArgusUpdate: Two motorists cut from their cars after Burgess Hill crash (From The Argus)

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Update: Two motorists cut from their cars after Burgess Hill crash

The Argus: Two motorists cut from their cars after Hassocks crash Two motorists cut from their cars after Hassocks crash

A learner driver has suffered serious injuries following a road crash.

The 17-year-old girl from Pyecombe was on a lesson in a Vauxhall when her car collided with a Jeep on the A273 in Burgess Hill at 8.10pm last night.

The teenager and a 48-year-old woman from Hurstpierpoint, who was driving the Jeep, were both taken to Royal Sussex County Hospital with serious injuries after firefighters had to cut them from their vehicles.

A 39-year-old man from Brighton, the passenger in the Vauxhall, suffered a minor injury.

The learner driver was travelling northbound when it crossed onto the opposite carriageway colliding with a silver Jeep Patriot travelling south.

The road was closed by police and firefighters were at the scene for more than 90 minutes.

Eye-witnesses to the crash on social media described seeing a Land Rover with its front end caved in and debris across the road.

Anyone who saw what happened is asked to contact police on 101 or email collision.appeal@sussex.pnn.police.uk quoting serial 1269 of 21/1.

Do you know the people involved in the crash or did you see what happened? Then call The Argus on 01273 544530 or email neil.vowles@theargus.co.uk.

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Comments (7)

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12:50pm Wed 22 Jan 14

straightasadye says...

I consider it irresponsible of authorities to allow "learner" drivers to be on the road during hours of darkness. Only "after" passing the driving test should they be allowed to drive after sunset. You can't learn to drive in the dark: and its difficult enough at times even for extremely proficent drivers to drive in the dark.
I consider it irresponsible of authorities to allow "learner" drivers to be on the road during hours of darkness. Only "after" passing the driving test should they be allowed to drive after sunset. You can't learn to drive in the dark: and its difficult enough at times even for extremely proficent drivers to drive in the dark. straightasadye
  • Score: -6

4:12pm Wed 22 Jan 14

sarahsbrighton says...

straightasadye wrote:
I consider it irresponsible of authorities to allow "learner" drivers to be on the road during hours of darkness. Only "after" passing the driving test should they be allowed to drive after sunset. You can't learn to drive in the dark: and its difficult enough at times even for extremely proficent drivers to drive in the dark.
What a bizarre comment. Yes it can be harder driving in the dark, that's exactly why it's a requirement for a learner to drive with their instructor... in the dark! Rather that than let a newly qualified driver, drive in the dark for the first time, completely alone, with no help or advice.

Same goes for heavy traffic, snow, wet weather etc - all of these things require different skills, stopping distances and coping mechanisms - they don't just automatically come when you pass your test - someone has to teach you them first.
[quote][p][bold]straightasadye[/bold] wrote: I consider it irresponsible of authorities to allow "learner" drivers to be on the road during hours of darkness. Only "after" passing the driving test should they be allowed to drive after sunset. You can't learn to drive in the dark: and its difficult enough at times even for extremely proficent drivers to drive in the dark.[/p][/quote]What a bizarre comment. Yes it can be harder driving in the dark, that's exactly why it's a requirement for a learner to drive with their instructor... in the dark! Rather that than let a newly qualified driver, drive in the dark for the first time, completely alone, with no help or advice. Same goes for heavy traffic, snow, wet weather etc - all of these things require different skills, stopping distances and coping mechanisms - they don't just automatically come when you pass your test - someone has to teach you them first. sarahsbrighton
  • Score: 4

7:54pm Wed 22 Jan 14

qm says...

Note to unnamed journalist: a Jeep is not a Landrover in the same way that a Toyota is not a Renault . . . . . . .
Note to unnamed journalist: a Jeep is not a Landrover in the same way that a Toyota is not a Renault . . . . . . . qm
  • Score: 1

8:28pm Wed 22 Jan 14

oldbonnet says...

sarahsbrighton wrote:
straightasadye wrote:
I consider it irresponsible of authorities to allow "learner" drivers to be on the road during hours of darkness. Only "after" passing the driving test should they be allowed to drive after sunset. You can't learn to drive in the dark: and its difficult enough at times even for extremely proficent drivers to drive in the dark.
What a bizarre comment. Yes it can be harder driving in the dark, that's exactly why it's a requirement for a learner to drive with their instructor... in the dark! Rather that than let a newly qualified driver, drive in the dark for the first time, completely alone, with no help or advice.

Same goes for heavy traffic, snow, wet weather etc - all of these things require different skills, stopping distances and coping mechanisms - they don't just automatically come when you pass your test - someone has to teach you them first.
Once a learner driver has mastered the necessary skills for competent driving and has passed the driving test it should be compulsory for them to then take a lesson in both night driving and motorway driving before they venture out alone.
Yes you're right it is harder to drive in the dark, more so if you don't have the basic driving skills in the first place.
These skills and the confidence that comes with acquiring them can't be taught to, or absorbed sufficiently by, a learner driver in the dark!
[quote][p][bold]sarahsbrighton[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]straightasadye[/bold] wrote: I consider it irresponsible of authorities to allow "learner" drivers to be on the road during hours of darkness. Only "after" passing the driving test should they be allowed to drive after sunset. You can't learn to drive in the dark: and its difficult enough at times even for extremely proficent drivers to drive in the dark.[/p][/quote]What a bizarre comment. Yes it can be harder driving in the dark, that's exactly why it's a requirement for a learner to drive with their instructor... in the dark! Rather that than let a newly qualified driver, drive in the dark for the first time, completely alone, with no help or advice. Same goes for heavy traffic, snow, wet weather etc - all of these things require different skills, stopping distances and coping mechanisms - they don't just automatically come when you pass your test - someone has to teach you them first.[/p][/quote]Once a learner driver has mastered the necessary skills for competent driving and has passed the driving test it should be compulsory for them to then take a lesson in both night driving and motorway driving before they venture out alone. Yes you're right it is harder to drive in the dark, more so if you don't have the basic driving skills in the first place. These skills and the confidence that comes with acquiring them can't be taught to, or absorbed sufficiently by, a learner driver in the dark! oldbonnet
  • Score: 2

11:24pm Wed 22 Jan 14

Old Ladys Gin says...

The purpose of the basic driving test is now and has always been simply to ensure that the most dangerous are not granted a licence.
Competence except in a minuscule form has very little to do with it.
The purpose of the basic driving test is now and has always been simply to ensure that the most dangerous are not granted a licence. Competence except in a minuscule form has very little to do with it. Old Ladys Gin
  • Score: -2

11:25pm Wed 22 Jan 14

winewomenandsong says...

I should inform Sarahasbrighton it is NOT a requirement for a learner driver to drive with their instructor in the dark nor is it sensible for a learner driver to be out learning to drive in the dark either, and few professional driving schools do entertain giving driving lessons in the dark.
The basic purpose of driving lessons is to master driving a vehicle and be taught how to drive in accordance with the highway code.
You can't be taught common sense and intelligence, you have it or you haven't, and likewise you can't be "taught" how to "master" driving in the dark. All you can be taught about night driving are the does and dont's - like when to drive on dipped headlights/full beam etc.
I should inform Sarahasbrighton it is NOT a requirement for a learner driver to drive with their instructor in the dark nor is it sensible for a learner driver to be out learning to drive in the dark either, and few professional driving schools do entertain giving driving lessons in the dark. The basic purpose of driving lessons is to master driving a vehicle and be taught how to drive in accordance with the highway code. You can't be taught common sense and intelligence, you have it or you haven't, and likewise you can't be "taught" how to "master" driving in the dark. All you can be taught about night driving are the does and dont's - like when to drive on dipped headlights/full beam etc. winewomenandsong
  • Score: 2

6:21am Wed 5 Feb 14

WestStander17 says...

It isn't a requirement that a learner driver does any driving in the dark, however, I would rather a loved one drove in the dark for the first time with an Instructor rather than on their own.

Not allowing driving lessons in the dark at all is just not realistic. In fact, in some ways its safer. Less traffic on the roads once rush hour has died down and seeing traffic coming at closed in junctions becomes much easier. Unlit roads are the obvious ones that do become trickier in the dark but, as I said before, I'd much prefer a loved one to experience it with their Instructor on the Monday before passing their test on the Wednesday and then potentially doing it on their own by the Friday! And, of course, at this time of year, some people would only have the time to do the lessons after dark.

Driving Schools still run Pass Plus courses for newly qualified drivers to gain more experience with their Instructors after they have passed their test. This includes a Night Driving module as well as Motorways.

This accident possibly could have happened in the middle of the day as much as it could at night. Probably a tiny error by an inexperienced driver. Thankfully, everyone is ok. I'd add that when a person is near or just taken their test, they are probably safer than a lot of drivers out there that have been driving for years.
It isn't a requirement that a learner driver does any driving in the dark, however, I would rather a loved one drove in the dark for the first time with an Instructor rather than on their own. Not allowing driving lessons in the dark at all is just not realistic. In fact, in some ways its safer. Less traffic on the roads once rush hour has died down and seeing traffic coming at closed in junctions becomes much easier. Unlit roads are the obvious ones that do become trickier in the dark but, as I said before, I'd much prefer a loved one to experience it with their Instructor on the Monday before passing their test on the Wednesday and then potentially doing it on their own by the Friday! And, of course, at this time of year, some people would only have the time to do the lessons after dark. Driving Schools still run Pass Plus courses for newly qualified drivers to gain more experience with their Instructors after they have passed their test. This includes a Night Driving module as well as Motorways. This accident possibly could have happened in the middle of the day as much as it could at night. Probably a tiny error by an inexperienced driver. Thankfully, everyone is ok. I'd add that when a person is near or just taken their test, they are probably safer than a lot of drivers out there that have been driving for years. WestStander17
  • Score: 0

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