Put your questions to the woman behind the UK's first fundraising degree

First published in News The Argus: Photograph of the Author by

The University of Chichester will run the world's first undergraduate degree in charity fundraising from September.

It is the brainchild of veteran fundraiser Donna Day Lafferty and will run modules in subjects such as Major Donor Fundraising, where students will “learn how to capture the hearts and minds of some of the world’s wealthiest people” and Event Planning, Design and Creation, which encourages students to “Get your wellies on, don those high heels: it’s time to get very serious about parties”.

Have you got a question for Donna about the course or about charity findraising?

Leave your questions below or send them to news@theargus.co.uk.

 

 

 

Comments (4)

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8:39am Sat 15 Mar 14

From beer to uncertainty says...

With between 1p and 5p out of every donated pound sometimes going to the donors intended cause, aren't most charities simply self-serving, tax-dodging, institutions?
Legitimate businesses seem to pay more tax whilst not relying on the good will of gullible volunteers to ensure big fat salaries and expense accounts for the 'senior management' of charities - do you think if more donors knew just how bad this situation seems to have got then they would simply not donate? Why are so many people 'making a good living' off the backs of volunteers and gullible donors?

In view of the above questions, does a degree course simply demonstrate how charities are a predominantly self-serving businesses that donate relatively little to the worthy causes they use to pay themselves quite handsomely? When they claim to have raised billions for worthy causes - should they be forced to indicate the billions they've made 'to cover their overheads'?

Will the degree teach 'charity entrepreneurs' how to, say, set up businesses where 'all profits go to charity' - that don't quite explain how this can net the owners a big pile of money? It seems to be getting popular.
With between 1p and 5p out of every donated pound sometimes going to the donors intended cause, aren't most charities simply self-serving, tax-dodging, institutions? Legitimate businesses seem to pay more tax whilst not relying on the good will of gullible volunteers to ensure big fat salaries and expense accounts for the 'senior management' of charities - do you think if more donors knew just how bad this situation seems to have got then they would simply not donate? Why are so many people 'making a good living' off the backs of volunteers and gullible donors? In view of the above questions, does a degree course simply demonstrate how charities are a predominantly self-serving businesses that donate relatively little to the worthy causes they use to pay themselves quite handsomely? When they claim to have raised billions for worthy causes - should they be forced to indicate the billions they've made 'to cover their overheads'? Will the degree teach 'charity entrepreneurs' how to, say, set up businesses where 'all profits go to charity' - that don't quite explain how this can net the owners a big pile of money? It seems to be getting popular. From beer to uncertainty
  • Score: 4

9:24am Sat 15 Mar 14

Morpheus says...

Is there another to teach us the best way to avoid chuggers?
Is there another to teach us the best way to avoid chuggers? Morpheus
  • Score: 6

11:47am Sat 15 Mar 14

clubrob6 says...

Charities used to run by donating there time for free,why do we need a degree course? is it to justify the person a high salary.When I donate to charity I make sure its for something I know will benefit such as the Sussex Beacon as many large charities these days very little actually goes to the charity cause.I also never donate to anyone for charity on the street unless they are not being pushy.
Charities used to run by donating there time for free,why do we need a degree course? is it to justify the person a high salary.When I donate to charity I make sure its for something I know will benefit such as the Sussex Beacon as many large charities these days very little actually goes to the charity cause.I also never donate to anyone for charity on the street unless they are not being pushy. clubrob6
  • Score: 3

2:37pm Sat 15 Mar 14

fredaj says...

Why is a degree required to beg people for money?
Why is a degree required to beg people for money? fredaj
  • Score: 2

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