Cases of internet cyber bullying almost double in East Sussex

The number of children being bullied via the internet has soared.

Since 2008 nearly double the number of youngsters at schools in East Sussex have reported being cyber bullied on sites including Twitter, Bebo and Facebook.

That year, 125 children in the county reported being tormented online. By 2012, the figure reached 225.

Brighton and Hove City Council and West Sussex County Councils said they did not collate such figures.

Yesterday (December 4) East Sussex County Council said it took cyber bullying hugely seriously.

A spokesman said: “East Sussex County Council takes the issue of bullying extremely seriously and it has absolutely no place, in any shape or form, in our schools or in the wider community.”

The council said it had drawn up an anti-bullying strategy which covers all aspects of bullying, including cyber bullying.

'Addressing issues'

The spokesman added that the yearly survey helped the authority identify “trends and issues to address”.

He said: “There’s no doubt that the internet and social media, as well as opening up a world of learning opportunities for our young people, can also expose them to risk.

“We are fully committed to keeping children safe when they are in school and educating them to be so when they are not.

“We provide a range of advice and guidance to schools on safe use of the internet and e-safety, and offer e-safety courses for schools and parents.

“Cyber-safety was the main theme of a conference organised by young people that we supported during Anti-Bullying Week last month.”

Cybersmile charity

While the number of cyber bullying incidents in 2012 was up on the figure for 2008, 2011 saw 251 in total.

Earlier this year, The Argus revealed how Poppy Freeman was forced to leave Hove Park School and then Cardinal Newman School after a minor falling-out with other children led to death threats being posted on social networking website Facebook.

Scott Freeman, her father, who lives in Brighton, set up a cyber bullying charity following this because he feels police and schools “simply do not do enough” to support victims.

The Cybersmile group has been campaigning for specific Government legislation to outlaw cyber bullying and will provide information, guidance and advice to people of all ages who are concerned about online safety.

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Comments (3)

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9:57pm Wed 5 Dec 12

mimseycal says...

Bullying will stay a feature of life as long as we, as a society, accept it. If a social network on the net, a forum on the net, a group of people in the street or children on a playground will shrug and turn away, it will continue.

Those who engage in bullying, be it cyber bullying or playground, public thoroughfare bullying, should be ostracised ... immediately and without investigation. There is no justfication for name calling, no 'oh well ... boys will be boys' or 'it is just words' ... As soon as the first hint of disregard for the feelings of others rears its ugly head, send the offenders to Coventry.

Today, they get away with calling someone a tattle tale, tomorrow they will call them something worse and by the end of the week they think they are justified in death threats.
Bullying will stay a feature of life as long as we, as a society, accept it. If a social network on the net, a forum on the net, a group of people in the street or children on a playground will shrug and turn away, it will continue. Those who engage in bullying, be it cyber bullying or playground, public thoroughfare bullying, should be ostracised ... immediately and without investigation. There is no justfication for name calling, no 'oh well ... boys will be boys' or 'it is just words' ... As soon as the first hint of disregard for the feelings of others rears its ugly head, send the offenders to Coventry. Today, they get away with calling someone a tattle tale, tomorrow they will call them something worse and by the end of the week they think they are justified in death threats. mimseycal

12:37am Thu 6 Dec 12

funkyyoyo says...

cut off the accounts,and buy a book,sorted!
cut off the accounts,and buy a book,sorted! funkyyoyo

5:53am Tue 11 Dec 12

markmiller77e says...

Monitoring everything kids do on the web is the key. That is the only way to know if your child is a bully or a victim himself. For those who say that kids also need privacy, there is the case of the unfortunate Amanda Todd. I watch who my son is talking to on Facebook using an app called Qustodio that allows me to view the profile pictures of accounts that he engages with. Such monitoring is for their own good. Qustodio is a nice app. Just Google for it.
Monitoring everything kids do on the web is the key. That is the only way to know if your child is a bully or a victim himself. For those who say that kids also need privacy, there is the case of the unfortunate Amanda Todd. I watch who my son is talking to on Facebook using an app called Qustodio that allows me to view the profile pictures of accounts that he engages with. Such monitoring is for their own good. Qustodio is a nice app. Just Google for it. markmiller77e

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