Bid for £750k school all-weather pitch rejected

The Argus: Phelim MacCafferty, chairman of the council’s planning committee Phelim MacCafferty, chairman of the council’s planning committee

A School's plans for a new £750,000 floodlit all-weather pitch will not go ahead.

Dorothy Stringer, in Loder Road, Brighton, wanted to build a 107m by 76.5m facility on its playing fields.

Richard Bradford, the school’s headteacher, claimed it would see a “largely unusable, badly-damaged waterlogged space” turned into a community facility.

But hundreds of people objected, voicing concern over the possibility of light pollution and the removal of two protected mature elms.


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After an hour-long discussion yesterday Brighton and Hove City Council’s planning committee rejected the scheme by ten votes to two.

In a statement released after the meeting, Mr Bradford said he was “hugely disappointed”.

He added: “While the school regretted the potential loss of two mature elms for this development, we believed the overall benefits outweighed this loss.

“This included the addition of 30 elms to the national elm collection, the bio-diversity net gains of the proposed butterfly havens and improvements to the education and health of generations of children.

“We were shocked to hear the view of some councillors that tackling obesity is not the responsibility of schools but should be dealt with at home.

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“The Government certainly see tackling obesity as both ours and the councils’ responsibility.”

The school said it had already secured £500,000 from the Football Foundation towards the project with the rest being raised from income for bookings.

Phelim MacCafferty, chairman of the council’s planning committee, said: “I don’t think it’s a good thing to say that development is for your good but we have to cut down two brilliant trees.

“I’m not sure that’s appropriate.”

Comments (20)

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9:21am Thu 12 Dec 13

s&k says...

A real shame - and you moan about youth crime, obesity, drink and drug related crime, anti social behaviour. Enjoy the trees.
A real shame - and you moan about youth crime, obesity, drink and drug related crime, anti social behaviour. Enjoy the trees. s&k

9:27am Thu 12 Dec 13

tykemison says...

A real shame!?!?!For whom s&k? Not for any sane-minded individual who cares about more than money making development scams! Well done Brighton and Hove planning committee, common sense prevails, brilliant start to the day!
A real shame!?!?!For whom s&k? Not for any sane-minded individual who cares about more than money making development scams! Well done Brighton and Hove planning committee, common sense prevails, brilliant start to the day! tykemison

9:40am Thu 12 Dec 13

s&k says...

tykemison wrote:
A real shame!?!?!For whom s&k? Not for any sane-minded individual who cares about more than money making development scams! Well done Brighton and Hove planning committee, common sense prevails, brilliant start to the day!
The same planning committee that put the Hollingdean Waste Transfer Facility in the middle of a residential area and behind an infant school.
[quote][p][bold]tykemison[/bold] wrote: A real shame!?!?!For whom s&k? Not for any sane-minded individual who cares about more than money making development scams! Well done Brighton and Hove planning committee, common sense prevails, brilliant start to the day![/p][/quote]The same planning committee that put the Hollingdean Waste Transfer Facility in the middle of a residential area and behind an infant school. s&k

1:57pm Thu 12 Dec 13

saveourschooltrees says...

Mr Bradfords comments are quite disingenuous to the committee and reek of 'sour grapes'. Both the planning officers and the committee have bent over backwards to help out the school with this application; The school submitted large amounts of supporting information after the public consultation period had ended and were even trying to make changes to try and rescue their ill thought out scheme on the day of the committee. The vote against was a landslide of 10 to 2, with cross party dissapproval of the scheme. One of the councillors felt it was 'really cheeky' that the school wanted to cut down trees they had previously planted as part of a planning commitment when they built the sports hall. The county ecologist had questioned whether the proposal would enhance the ecology of the site, and both Brighton and Hove Wildlife Forum and Brighton & Hove Arboriculture team had lodged formal objections. The reason the application was refused was because of the schools own arrogance in wanting to max out the development, for maximum operating profit at the expense of the trees, the ecosystem and the local community. Perhaps next time Mr Bradford will take a lesson from Varndean school who are redeveloping one of their pitches to provide the first 3G pitch in North Brighton, without cutting down trees or putting in 2000 watt, 15m high floodlights.
Mr Bradfords comments are quite disingenuous to the committee and reek of 'sour grapes'. Both the planning officers and the committee have bent over backwards to help out the school with this application; The school submitted large amounts of supporting information after the public consultation period had ended and were even trying to make changes to try and rescue their ill thought out scheme on the day of the committee. The vote against was a landslide of 10 to 2, with cross party dissapproval of the scheme. One of the councillors felt it was 'really cheeky' that the school wanted to cut down trees they had previously planted as part of a planning commitment when they built the sports hall. The county ecologist had questioned whether the proposal would enhance the ecology of the site, and both Brighton and Hove Wildlife Forum and Brighton & Hove Arboriculture team had lodged formal objections. The reason the application was refused was because of the schools own arrogance in wanting to max out the development, for maximum operating profit at the expense of the trees, the ecosystem and the local community. Perhaps next time Mr Bradford will take a lesson from Varndean school who are redeveloping one of their pitches to provide the first 3G pitch in North Brighton, without cutting down trees or putting in 2000 watt, 15m high floodlights. saveourschooltrees

2:27pm Thu 12 Dec 13

fredflintstone1 says...

Would the head teacher not be better-employed obtaining compensation under the school's PFI contract, for what he now conveniently describes as a “largely unusable, badly-damaged waterlogged space”, which of course used to be a cricket field?

It's only a combination of the school's neglect and negligence that has allowed the land to reach this state, and now it wants to exploit this space for commercial purposes (pitches to rent at a rate of over £100 an hour!), instead of restoring it for its pupils. Rather like a landlord who lets a house fall down, in order to build a block of flats there because they're worth more!

It's nothing to do with encouraging children to play sport. Putting up 4.5m fencing around their playing field for example. Is this what we want for our children - denying them the opportunity to have a kick-around out of school hours? Locking them out of their grounds?

The message that comes out of this is very clear. If you can afford to pay, then we'll let you play. Otherwise, all you kids, keep out! We don't want you here.

(Although we might if you're part of the private school that is also based here at Dorothy Stringer, because you're paying up to £485 per week for the privilege of being with us, and we do like to flag up our facilities for commercial benefits!!)
Would the head teacher not be better-employed obtaining compensation under the school's PFI contract, for what he now conveniently describes as a “largely unusable, badly-damaged waterlogged space”, which of course used to be a cricket field? It's only a combination of the school's neglect and negligence that has allowed the land to reach this state, and now it wants to exploit this space for commercial purposes (pitches to rent at a rate of over £100 an hour!), instead of restoring it for its pupils. Rather like a landlord who lets a house fall down, in order to build a block of flats there because they're worth more! It's nothing to do with encouraging children to play sport. Putting up 4.5m fencing around their playing field for example. Is this what we want for our children - denying them the opportunity to have a kick-around out of school hours? Locking them out of their grounds? The message that comes out of this is very clear. If you can afford to pay, then we'll let you play. Otherwise, all you kids, keep out! We don't want you here. (Although we might if you're part of the private school that is also based here at Dorothy Stringer, because you're paying up to £485 per week for the privilege of being with us, and we do like to flag up our facilities for commercial benefits!!) fredflintstone1

4:07pm Thu 12 Dec 13

bholness says...

Does Brighton really need yet another of these pitches? Although the application claimed that the nearest equivalent pitch is located over 30 miles away in Midhurst, recent additions at Blatchington Mill and Waterhill have added to the wealth of under used floodlit all weather pitches, all within short distance of the proposed site.
The money spent on this application would have been far better invested in the upkeep of DorothyStringers current facilities.
Does Brighton really need yet another of these pitches? Although the application claimed that the nearest equivalent pitch is located over 30 miles away in Midhurst, recent additions at Blatchington Mill and Waterhill have added to the wealth of under used floodlit all weather pitches, all within short distance of the proposed site. The money spent on this application would have been far better invested in the upkeep of DorothyStringers current facilities. bholness

4:28pm Thu 12 Dec 13

s&k says...

bholness wrote:
Does Brighton really need yet another of these pitches? Although the application claimed that the nearest equivalent pitch is located over 30 miles away in Midhurst, recent additions at Blatchington Mill and Waterhill have added to the wealth of under used floodlit all weather pitches, all within short distance of the proposed site. The money spent on this application would have been far better invested in the upkeep of DorothyStringers current facilities.
Do you honestly think there is enough to do for young people to do in Brighton, especially during the winter when school playing fields are rendered useless. What would you rather see in its place - a supermarket or giant car park on the school premises?
[quote][p][bold]bholness[/bold] wrote: Does Brighton really need yet another of these pitches? Although the application claimed that the nearest equivalent pitch is located over 30 miles away in Midhurst, recent additions at Blatchington Mill and Waterhill have added to the wealth of under used floodlit all weather pitches, all within short distance of the proposed site. The money spent on this application would have been far better invested in the upkeep of DorothyStringers current facilities.[/p][/quote]Do you honestly think there is enough to do for young people to do in Brighton, especially during the winter when school playing fields are rendered useless. What would you rather see in its place - a supermarket or giant car park on the school premises? s&k

4:57pm Thu 12 Dec 13

bholness says...

s&k wrote:
bholness wrote: Does Brighton really need yet another of these pitches? Although the application claimed that the nearest equivalent pitch is located over 30 miles away in Midhurst, recent additions at Blatchington Mill and Waterhill have added to the wealth of under used floodlit all weather pitches, all within short distance of the proposed site. The money spent on this application would have been far better invested in the upkeep of DorothyStringers current facilities.
Do you honestly think there is enough to do for young people to do in Brighton, especially during the winter when school playing fields are rendered useless. What would you rather see in its place - a supermarket or giant car park on the school premises?
With respect, young people are far more likely to take a ball to an unfenced field for an impromptu kick around than pay the expensive hire fees for a facility such as this.
[quote][p][bold]s&k[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]bholness[/bold] wrote: Does Brighton really need yet another of these pitches? Although the application claimed that the nearest equivalent pitch is located over 30 miles away in Midhurst, recent additions at Blatchington Mill and Waterhill have added to the wealth of under used floodlit all weather pitches, all within short distance of the proposed site. The money spent on this application would have been far better invested in the upkeep of DorothyStringers current facilities.[/p][/quote]Do you honestly think there is enough to do for young people to do in Brighton, especially during the winter when school playing fields are rendered useless. What would you rather see in its place - a supermarket or giant car park on the school premises?[/p][/quote]With respect, young people are far more likely to take a ball to an unfenced field for an impromptu kick around than pay the expensive hire fees for a facility such as this. bholness

5:01pm Thu 12 Dec 13

fredflintstone1 says...

s&k wrote:
bholness wrote:
Does Brighton really need yet another of these pitches? Although the application claimed that the nearest equivalent pitch is located over 30 miles away in Midhurst, recent additions at Blatchington Mill and Waterhill have added to the wealth of under used floodlit all weather pitches, all within short distance of the proposed site. The money spent on this application would have been far better invested in the upkeep of DorothyStringers current facilities.
Do you honestly think there is enough to do for young people to do in Brighton, especially during the winter when school playing fields are rendered useless. What would you rather see in its place - a supermarket or giant car park on the school premises?
Err ....I thought football was a winter sport, played at school on sometimes wet and muddy pitches?

These pitches exclude poorer children whose parents cannot afford for them to pay to play, and they are socially divisive.

Stringer is another school that can afford to employ a business manager. That alone should ring the alarm bells as to whether their focus is on education or not.
[quote][p][bold]s&k[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]bholness[/bold] wrote: Does Brighton really need yet another of these pitches? Although the application claimed that the nearest equivalent pitch is located over 30 miles away in Midhurst, recent additions at Blatchington Mill and Waterhill have added to the wealth of under used floodlit all weather pitches, all within short distance of the proposed site. The money spent on this application would have been far better invested in the upkeep of DorothyStringers current facilities.[/p][/quote]Do you honestly think there is enough to do for young people to do in Brighton, especially during the winter when school playing fields are rendered useless. What would you rather see in its place - a supermarket or giant car park on the school premises?[/p][/quote]Err ....I thought football was a winter sport, played at school on sometimes wet and muddy pitches? These pitches exclude poorer children whose parents cannot afford for them to pay to play, and they are socially divisive. Stringer is another school that can afford to employ a business manager. That alone should ring the alarm bells as to whether their focus is on education or not. fredflintstone1

6:56pm Thu 12 Dec 13

Forrealist says...

Trying to get this approved on the grounds that it would tackle obesity was a cynical ploy. Does anyone really think that replacing a free recreation area with a paid-for pitch would cause hundreds of inactive, overweight kids to say, 'You know what, I'm not going to MacDonalds. I'm going to pick up a ball and eat only healthy food from now on'?

(Exercise doesn't fix obesity anyway: eating less does. Exercise actually increases your apetite for sugar foods.)

Even the school's own arboricultural consultants had admitted that the loss of the elms was 'regrettable', yet they stepped way beyond their brief in saying it was justified because the scheme would tackle obesity. Since when were tree experts qualified to make such a judgement?
Trying to get this approved on the grounds that it would tackle obesity was a cynical ploy. Does anyone really think that replacing a free recreation area with a paid-for pitch would cause hundreds of inactive, overweight kids to say, 'You know what, I'm not going to MacDonalds. I'm going to pick up a ball and eat only healthy food from now on'? (Exercise doesn't fix obesity anyway: eating less does. Exercise actually increases your apetite for sugar foods.) Even the school's own arboricultural consultants had admitted that the loss of the elms was 'regrettable', yet they stepped way beyond their brief in saying it was justified because the scheme would tackle obesity. Since when were tree experts qualified to make such a judgement? Forrealist

8:34pm Thu 12 Dec 13

marchyman01 says...

Err ....I thought football was a winter sport, played at school on sometimes wet and muddy pitches?

These pitches exclude poorer children whose parents cannot afford for them to pay to play, and they are socially divisive.

Stringer is another school that can afford to employ a business manager. That alone should ring the alarm bells as to whether their focus is on education or not.

One....Football is a team sport played all year round, Because of 3g you can also play numerous other sports on the facility. Two..The pitches would not exclude poorer children, you only have to look at the record Stringer had when running the school sport partnership, voted best in the UK .
Three..All schools now have a business manager whether they admit it or not, the role normally coincides with a bursar role. As for questioning whether the school focus is on education is simply pathetic, just look at the schools academic results.

As for the comment..(Exercise doesn't fix obesity anyway: eating less does. Exercise actually increases your apetite for sugar foods.)
You are obviously not very educated in this area. Exercise greatly helps with the fight against child obesity as does the education on food intake and what you can do to burn calories .
Err ....I thought football was a winter sport, played at school on sometimes wet and muddy pitches? These pitches exclude poorer children whose parents cannot afford for them to pay to play, and they are socially divisive. Stringer is another school that can afford to employ a business manager. That alone should ring the alarm bells as to whether their focus is on education or not. One....Football is a team sport played all year round, Because of 3g you can also play numerous other sports on the facility. Two..The pitches would not exclude poorer children, you only have to look at the record Stringer had when running the school sport partnership, voted best in the UK . Three..All schools now have a business manager whether they admit it or not, the role normally coincides with a bursar role. As for questioning whether the school focus is on education is simply pathetic, just look at the schools academic results. As for the comment..(Exercise doesn't fix obesity anyway: eating less does. Exercise actually increases your apetite for sugar foods.) You are obviously not very educated in this area. Exercise greatly helps with the fight against child obesity as does the education on food intake and what you can do to burn calories . marchyman01

9:00pm Thu 12 Dec 13

Evanna says...

Wow, would've been such a great asset to the school. Sad.
Wow, would've been such a great asset to the school. Sad. Evanna

9:51pm Thu 12 Dec 13

Forrealist says...

marchyman01 I have a degree in biochemistry and physiology, and studied and researched both for several years at postgraduate level. I stand by what I said. Exercise does not burn that many calories (as a glance at the readout on an treadmill after half an hour's running will tell you). If you really want to tackle obesity, you need to change what you eat. This pitch would have done little to tackle obesity.
marchyman01 I have a degree in biochemistry and physiology, and studied and researched both for several years at postgraduate level. I stand by what I said. Exercise does not burn that many calories (as a glance at the readout on an treadmill after half an hour's running will tell you). If you really want to tackle obesity, you need to change what you eat. This pitch would have done little to tackle obesity. Forrealist

10:04pm Thu 12 Dec 13

fredflintstone1 says...

marchyman01 wrote:
Err ....I thought football was a winter sport, played at school on sometimes wet and muddy pitches?

These pitches exclude poorer children whose parents cannot afford for them to pay to play, and they are socially divisive.

Stringer is another school that can afford to employ a business manager. That alone should ring the alarm bells as to whether their focus is on education or not.

One....Football is a team sport played all year round, Because of 3g you can also play numerous other sports on the facility. Two..The pitches would not exclude poorer children, you only have to look at the record Stringer had when running the school sport partnership, voted best in the UK .
Three..All schools now have a business manager whether they admit it or not, the role normally coincides with a bursar role. As for questioning whether the school focus is on education is simply pathetic, just look at the schools academic results.

As for the comment..(Exercise doesn't fix obesity anyway: eating less does. Exercise actually increases your apetite for sugar foods.)
You are obviously not very educated in this area. Exercise greatly helps with the fight against child obesity as does the education on food intake and what you can do to burn calories .
1. In response to a question, the head told the planning committee that the pitch was designed for playing football, and that it wasn't suitable for other sports like hockey.

2. Charging for the pitches would obviously prevent some children from poorer families being able to use such a facility. I know families that struggle to pay the parking in Preston Park in order to let their children carrying on playing regularly there. Do you live in the real world?

Have you thought that if the school employed a proper groundsman rather than a business manager, their pitches might be in better shape anyway?

3. If you actually look at the school's results, you will see the percentage of pupils gaining A*-C grades at Dorothy Stringer fell in 2013, as compared with 2012. (Not that I think results/league tables are the best indicator of education - you'd have thought that at an ecoschool, pupils would be taught as a priority not to drop so much litter that someone has to be paid to spend much of their time running around picking it up after them).

As regards to Forrealist's statement about exercise which you seemingly disagree with, you don't need private pitches surrounded by 4.5m fences to aid the fight against obesity.
[quote][p][bold]marchyman01[/bold] wrote: Err ....I thought football was a winter sport, played at school on sometimes wet and muddy pitches? These pitches exclude poorer children whose parents cannot afford for them to pay to play, and they are socially divisive. Stringer is another school that can afford to employ a business manager. That alone should ring the alarm bells as to whether their focus is on education or not. One....Football is a team sport played all year round, Because of 3g you can also play numerous other sports on the facility. Two..The pitches would not exclude poorer children, you only have to look at the record Stringer had when running the school sport partnership, voted best in the UK . Three..All schools now have a business manager whether they admit it or not, the role normally coincides with a bursar role. As for questioning whether the school focus is on education is simply pathetic, just look at the schools academic results. As for the comment..(Exercise doesn't fix obesity anyway: eating less does. Exercise actually increases your apetite for sugar foods.) You are obviously not very educated in this area. Exercise greatly helps with the fight against child obesity as does the education on food intake and what you can do to burn calories .[/p][/quote]1. In response to a question, the head told the planning committee that the pitch was designed for playing football, and that it wasn't suitable for other sports like hockey. 2. Charging for the pitches would obviously prevent some children from poorer families being able to use such a facility. I know families that struggle to pay the parking in Preston Park in order to let their children carrying on playing regularly there. Do you live in the real world? Have you thought that if the school employed a proper groundsman rather than a business manager, their pitches might be in better shape anyway? 3. If you actually look at the school's results, you will see the percentage of pupils gaining A*-C grades at Dorothy Stringer fell in 2013, as compared with 2012. (Not that I think results/league tables are the best indicator of education - you'd have thought that at an ecoschool, pupils would be taught as a priority not to drop so much litter that someone has to be paid to spend much of their time running around picking it up after them). As regards to Forrealist's statement about exercise which you seemingly disagree with, you don't need private pitches surrounded by 4.5m fences to aid the fight against obesity. fredflintstone1

10:16pm Thu 12 Dec 13

marchyman01 says...

So are you saying that exercise does not in any way tackle obesity ?. As for half an hour on a treadmill you will burn calories. I know for a fact that children at the school regularly do this to test to see what calories they burn off compared to what they eat during the day. Agree that you also have to educate what people should and should not eat and is vitally important.. It is however a fact that if people are provided the opportunity and facilities to take part in physical exercise it can only be a good thing.

It is very strange that Brighton council have taken over the running of the largest sports festival in the country and now take all the plaudits for it, in which it promotes that Physical exercise at any age is a good thing for the mind and body as well as building relationships. The council also bemoans the lack of facilities where children can take part due to travel constraints.

The actual quote from the council was the following..When i was at school none of the fat kids did sport so whats the point in having better sports facilities at schools.
So are you saying that exercise does not in any way tackle obesity ?. As for half an hour on a treadmill you will burn calories. I know for a fact that children at the school regularly do this to test to see what calories they burn off compared to what they eat during the day. Agree that you also have to educate what people should and should not eat and is vitally important.. It is however a fact that if people are provided the opportunity and facilities to take part in physical exercise it can only be a good thing. It is very strange that Brighton council have taken over the running of the largest sports festival in the country and now take all the plaudits for it, in which it promotes that Physical exercise at any age is a good thing for the mind and body as well as building relationships. The council also bemoans the lack of facilities where children can take part due to travel constraints. The actual quote from the council was the following..When i was at school none of the fat kids did sport so whats the point in having better sports facilities at schools. marchyman01

10:29pm Thu 12 Dec 13

marchyman01 says...

In reply to Fred Flintstone who obviously is to worried to put there proper name here, yes i very much live in the real world thankyou.

A proper groundsman ? They already do and also does a great job.

The pitch would be funded by the football federation which would also enable Rugby, and many many sports, not all of them have to be in mainstream.

As for poorer families i will once again stand by what the school sport partnership achieved at the school with thousands of children using the facilities for no cost. This facility would go a long way to helping this happen again. Of course there will be a fence, a council health and safety report states that it is a requirement.

There wasnt a cost for parking at the school to use the facilties.

Yep all children shouldnt drop litter - im afraid it is now you that doesnt live in the real world.
In reply to Fred Flintstone who obviously is to worried to put there proper name here, yes i very much live in the real world thankyou. A proper groundsman ? They already do and also does a great job. The pitch would be funded by the football federation which would also enable Rugby, and many many sports, not all of them have to be in mainstream. As for poorer families i will once again stand by what the school sport partnership achieved at the school with thousands of children using the facilities for no cost. This facility would go a long way to helping this happen again. Of course there will be a fence, a council health and safety report states that it is a requirement. There wasnt a cost for parking at the school to use the facilties. Yep all children shouldnt drop litter - im afraid it is now you that doesnt live in the real world. marchyman01

8:12am Fri 13 Dec 13

bholness says...

Evanna wrote:
Wow, would've been such a great asset to the school. Sad.
The natural environment that the school enjoys is arguably a greater and more precious asset, it won't pay the bills though. If the school believes that the only way to tackle obesity is on artificial turf then the sensible solution is to utilise the under used pitches nearby. The money saved could then be spent on the upkeep of the grass pitches. People have been playing sport on grass for hundreds of years, yet it is only recently that we seem to have an obesity problem. Rather like the spoilt teenager who claims that a new outfit will be the answer to all of their problems the claim that plastic grass is the answer to the nations obesity woes defies common sense.
[quote][p][bold]Evanna[/bold] wrote: Wow, would've been such a great asset to the school. Sad.[/p][/quote]The natural environment that the school enjoys is arguably a greater and more precious asset, it won't pay the bills though. If the school believes that the only way to tackle obesity is on artificial turf then the sensible solution is to utilise the under used pitches nearby. The money saved could then be spent on the upkeep of the grass pitches. People have been playing sport on grass for hundreds of years, yet it is only recently that we seem to have an obesity problem. Rather like the spoilt teenager who claims that a new outfit will be the answer to all of their problems the claim that plastic grass is the answer to the nations obesity woes defies common sense. bholness

10:57am Fri 13 Dec 13

Quiterie says...

marchyman01 wrote:
Err ....I thought football was a winter sport, played at school on sometimes wet and muddy pitches?

These pitches exclude poorer children whose parents cannot afford for them to pay to play, and they are socially divisive.

Stringer is another school that can afford to employ a business manager. That alone should ring the alarm bells as to whether their focus is on education or not.

One....Football is a team sport played all year round, Because of 3g you can also play numerous other sports on the facility. Two..The pitches would not exclude poorer children, you only have to look at the record Stringer had when running the school sport partnership, voted best in the UK .
Three..All schools now have a business manager whether they admit it or not, the role normally coincides with a bursar role. As for questioning whether the school focus is on education is simply pathetic, just look at the schools academic results.

As for the comment..(Exercise doesn't fix obesity anyway: eating less does. Exercise actually increases your apetite for sugar foods.)
You are obviously not very educated in this area. Exercise greatly helps with the fight against child obesity as does the education on food intake and what you can do to burn calories .
"Just look at the schools academic results"!?!

If you're a bright child there, yes you'll get good results. If you're a low or middle achiever the results are appalling. Well below the National Averages, or the Brighton and Hove Averages.

Most of the other Brighton and Hove schools have overtaken Stringer when the quality of the intake is taken into account.

It's a myth that Stringer is such a wonderful school. Which is why their 'Outstanding' Ofsted grade will be quite rightly downgraded after their recent Ofsted inspection.
[quote][p][bold]marchyman01[/bold] wrote: Err ....I thought football was a winter sport, played at school on sometimes wet and muddy pitches? These pitches exclude poorer children whose parents cannot afford for them to pay to play, and they are socially divisive. Stringer is another school that can afford to employ a business manager. That alone should ring the alarm bells as to whether their focus is on education or not. One....Football is a team sport played all year round, Because of 3g you can also play numerous other sports on the facility. Two..The pitches would not exclude poorer children, you only have to look at the record Stringer had when running the school sport partnership, voted best in the UK . Three..All schools now have a business manager whether they admit it or not, the role normally coincides with a bursar role. As for questioning whether the school focus is on education is simply pathetic, just look at the schools academic results. As for the comment..(Exercise doesn't fix obesity anyway: eating less does. Exercise actually increases your apetite for sugar foods.) You are obviously not very educated in this area. Exercise greatly helps with the fight against child obesity as does the education on food intake and what you can do to burn calories .[/p][/quote]"Just look at the schools academic results"!?! If you're a bright child there, yes you'll get good results. If you're a low or middle achiever the results are appalling. Well below the National Averages, or the Brighton and Hove Averages. Most of the other Brighton and Hove schools have overtaken Stringer when the quality of the intake is taken into account. It's a myth that Stringer is such a wonderful school. Which is why their 'Outstanding' Ofsted grade will be quite rightly downgraded after their recent Ofsted inspection. Quiterie

11:11am Fri 13 Dec 13

marchyman01 says...

Quiterie wrote:
marchyman01 wrote:
Err ....I thought football was a winter sport, played at school on sometimes wet and muddy pitches?

These pitches exclude poorer children whose parents cannot afford for them to pay to play, and they are socially divisive.

Stringer is another school that can afford to employ a business manager. That alone should ring the alarm bells as to whether their focus is on education or not.

One....Football is a team sport played all year round, Because of 3g you can also play numerous other sports on the facility. Two..The pitches would not exclude poorer children, you only have to look at the record Stringer had when running the school sport partnership, voted best in the UK .
Three..All schools now have a business manager whether they admit it or not, the role normally coincides with a bursar role. As for questioning whether the school focus is on education is simply pathetic, just look at the schools academic results.

As for the comment..(Exercise doesn't fix obesity anyway: eating less does. Exercise actually increases your apetite for sugar foods.)
You are obviously not very educated in this area. Exercise greatly helps with the fight against child obesity as does the education on food intake and what you can do to burn calories .
"Just look at the schools academic results"!?!

If you're a bright child there, yes you'll get good results. If you're a low or middle achiever the results are appalling. Well below the National Averages, or the Brighton and Hove Averages.

Most of the other Brighton and Hove schools have overtaken Stringer when the quality of the intake is taken into account.

It's a myth that Stringer is such a wonderful school. Which is why their 'Outstanding' Ofsted grade will be quite rightly downgraded after their recent Ofsted inspection.
Just looked at the academic results for the last 10 years and they are above ..well above the national average. So no most other schools are actually still behind Stringer. I know of many children who attend the school and it is no myth about it being a wonderful school at all. The school is one of the most requested schools in Brighton and is unfortunate to have to turn so many children away. It has been a pioneer of many subjects and have a lot of schools come to Stringer for advice on how to move forward. As the subject of PE has been brought up, they have once again been classed as outstanding and have a teacher of the year award and still lead the way in Brighton for diversity in sport and forward thinking as well as teaching outstanding lessons.
[quote][p][bold]Quiterie[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]marchyman01[/bold] wrote: Err ....I thought football was a winter sport, played at school on sometimes wet and muddy pitches? These pitches exclude poorer children whose parents cannot afford for them to pay to play, and they are socially divisive. Stringer is another school that can afford to employ a business manager. That alone should ring the alarm bells as to whether their focus is on education or not. One....Football is a team sport played all year round, Because of 3g you can also play numerous other sports on the facility. Two..The pitches would not exclude poorer children, you only have to look at the record Stringer had when running the school sport partnership, voted best in the UK . Three..All schools now have a business manager whether they admit it or not, the role normally coincides with a bursar role. As for questioning whether the school focus is on education is simply pathetic, just look at the schools academic results. As for the comment..(Exercise doesn't fix obesity anyway: eating less does. Exercise actually increases your apetite for sugar foods.) You are obviously not very educated in this area. Exercise greatly helps with the fight against child obesity as does the education on food intake and what you can do to burn calories .[/p][/quote]"Just look at the schools academic results"!?! If you're a bright child there, yes you'll get good results. If you're a low or middle achiever the results are appalling. Well below the National Averages, or the Brighton and Hove Averages. Most of the other Brighton and Hove schools have overtaken Stringer when the quality of the intake is taken into account. It's a myth that Stringer is such a wonderful school. Which is why their 'Outstanding' Ofsted grade will be quite rightly downgraded after their recent Ofsted inspection.[/p][/quote]Just looked at the academic results for the last 10 years and they are above ..well above the national average. So no most other schools are actually still behind Stringer. I know of many children who attend the school and it is no myth about it being a wonderful school at all. The school is one of the most requested schools in Brighton and is unfortunate to have to turn so many children away. It has been a pioneer of many subjects and have a lot of schools come to Stringer for advice on how to move forward. As the subject of PE has been brought up, they have once again been classed as outstanding and have a teacher of the year award and still lead the way in Brighton for diversity in sport and forward thinking as well as teaching outstanding lessons. marchyman01

12:49pm Fri 13 Dec 13

Quiterie says...

marchyman01 wrote:
Quiterie wrote:
marchyman01 wrote:
Err ....I thought football was a winter sport, played at school on sometimes wet and muddy pitches?

These pitches exclude poorer children whose parents cannot afford for them to pay to play, and they are socially divisive.

Stringer is another school that can afford to employ a business manager. That alone should ring the alarm bells as to whether their focus is on education or not.

One....Football is a team sport played all year round, Because of 3g you can also play numerous other sports on the facility. Two..The pitches would not exclude poorer children, you only have to look at the record Stringer had when running the school sport partnership, voted best in the UK .
Three..All schools now have a business manager whether they admit it or not, the role normally coincides with a bursar role. As for questioning whether the school focus is on education is simply pathetic, just look at the schools academic results.

As for the comment..(Exercise doesn't fix obesity anyway: eating less does. Exercise actually increases your apetite for sugar foods.)
You are obviously not very educated in this area. Exercise greatly helps with the fight against child obesity as does the education on food intake and what you can do to burn calories .
"Just look at the schools academic results"!?!

If you're a bright child there, yes you'll get good results. If you're a low or middle achiever the results are appalling. Well below the National Averages, or the Brighton and Hove Averages.


Most of the other Brighton and Hove schools have overtaken Stringer when the quality of the intake is taken into account.

It's a myth that Stringer is such a wonderful school. Which is why their 'Outstanding' Ofsted grade will be quite rightly downgraded after their recent Ofsted inspection.
Just looked at the academic results for the last 10 years and they are above ..well above the national average. So no most other schools are actually still behind Stringer. I know of many children who attend the school and it is no myth about it being a wonderful school at all. The school is one of the most requested schools in Brighton and is unfortunate to have to turn so many children away. It has been a pioneer of many subjects and have a lot of schools come to Stringer for advice on how to move forward. As the subject of PE has been brought up, they have once again been classed as outstanding and have a teacher of the year award and still lead the way in Brighton for diversity in sport and forward thinking as well as teaching outstanding lessons.
You don't understand the point I'm making. Their total results are only above the National Average because their intake is massively skewed towards bright children. Of course the overall results are going to be above the National Average. If they weren't the school would be placed under “special measures"!

But the outcomes for low and middle ability children are poor. If you don't believe me take a look at the performance tables on the Dept for Education website.
[quote][p][bold]marchyman01[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Quiterie[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]marchyman01[/bold] wrote: Err ....I thought football was a winter sport, played at school on sometimes wet and muddy pitches? These pitches exclude poorer children whose parents cannot afford for them to pay to play, and they are socially divisive. Stringer is another school that can afford to employ a business manager. That alone should ring the alarm bells as to whether their focus is on education or not. One....Football is a team sport played all year round, Because of 3g you can also play numerous other sports on the facility. Two..The pitches would not exclude poorer children, you only have to look at the record Stringer had when running the school sport partnership, voted best in the UK . Three..All schools now have a business manager whether they admit it or not, the role normally coincides with a bursar role. As for questioning whether the school focus is on education is simply pathetic, just look at the schools academic results. As for the comment..(Exercise doesn't fix obesity anyway: eating less does. Exercise actually increases your apetite for sugar foods.) You are obviously not very educated in this area. Exercise greatly helps with the fight against child obesity as does the education on food intake and what you can do to burn calories .[/p][/quote]"Just look at the schools academic results"!?! If you're a bright child there, yes you'll get good results. If you're a low or middle achiever the results are appalling. Well below the National Averages, or the Brighton and Hove Averages. Most of the other Brighton and Hove schools have overtaken Stringer when the quality of the intake is taken into account. It's a myth that Stringer is such a wonderful school. Which is why their 'Outstanding' Ofsted grade will be quite rightly downgraded after their recent Ofsted inspection.[/p][/quote]Just looked at the academic results for the last 10 years and they are above ..well above the national average. So no most other schools are actually still behind Stringer. I know of many children who attend the school and it is no myth about it being a wonderful school at all. The school is one of the most requested schools in Brighton and is unfortunate to have to turn so many children away. It has been a pioneer of many subjects and have a lot of schools come to Stringer for advice on how to move forward. As the subject of PE has been brought up, they have once again been classed as outstanding and have a teacher of the year award and still lead the way in Brighton for diversity in sport and forward thinking as well as teaching outstanding lessons.[/p][/quote]You don't understand the point I'm making. Their total results are only above the National Average because their intake is massively skewed towards bright children. Of course the overall results are going to be above the National Average. If they weren't the school would be placed under “special measures"! But the outcomes for low and middle ability children are poor. If you don't believe me take a look at the performance tables on the Dept for Education website. Quiterie

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