The ArgusPatcham residents being told to prepare for possible evacuation over flooding (From The Argus)

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Patcham residents being told to prepare for possible evacuation over flooding

The Argus: Patcham residents being told to prepare for possible evacuation over flooding Patcham residents being told to prepare for possible evacuation over flooding

Patcham residents are being advised to prepare to possibly evacuate their homes due to flooding.

Brighton and Hove City Council has said the groundwater level in the area has risen sharply due to the heavy rain.

It has sent a letter to residents saying groundwater level had reached 40m AOD (Above Ordnance Datum) and advised affected residents to take some precautions as information from the Environment Agency suggests the water level may rise further. 

If the level reaches 45m AOD, local basements will be flooded and there will be some ground floor flooding.

 


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At these levels the risk is confined to properties along the north end of Old London Road and the lower part of the Ladies’ Mile Road. If levels rise further the area affected could extend.

The council is advising residents to make plans to stay with friends or relatives in case people need to leave their house.

They should prepare a bag with clothing, medicines and any other essentials and consider pets and move personal or sentimental items to safety.

During the flooding the electricty could fail, sewage might not drain away and accessing properties might be difficult.

Patcham councillor Geoffrey Theobald said: "I am not aware of residents evacuating at the moment but obviously there is considerable concern.

"It is more likely that we will reach a stage where we may need to evacuate next week, if the levels rise it is usually a few days after that the water comes down over the hills."

Engineers are giving out sandbags to those who are most likely to be affected by the flooding.

The council's environmental health team will monitor the risk of any water contamination.

Its adult social care team is in contact with known vulnerable adults in the area, and will establish a rest centre in the event that evacuation is required.

Further information and advice on what to do before or during a flood is available on the Environment Agency website or by calling the Floodline on 0845 988 1188.

Comments (18)

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7:13pm Fri 31 Jan 14

Falmer Wizard says...

Well done to the Council for giving prior advice of flooding plus helpful tips
Well done to the Council for giving prior advice of flooding plus helpful tips Falmer Wizard
  • Score: 10

8:45pm Fri 31 Jan 14

HJarrs says...

Good luck to those affected, but reading the Environmental Agency website, this could go on for some time.
Good luck to those affected, but reading the Environmental Agency website, this could go on for some time. HJarrs
  • Score: 1

8:47pm Fri 31 Jan 14

Nosfaratu says...

Well, so much for living in a place with re-occurring flooding. Move !

On a more serious note, 'pse' watch 'Inside-Out' at 7pm BBC1 Monday 3rd Feb.
The reason why the residents of the South East have constant traffic jams, accidents and appalling road conditions compared to the rest of the country.
Well, so much for living in a place with re-occurring flooding. Move ! On a more serious note, 'pse' watch 'Inside-Out' at 7pm BBC1 Monday 3rd Feb. The reason why the residents of the South East have constant traffic jams, accidents and appalling road conditions compared to the rest of the country. Nosfaratu
  • Score: -3

10:24pm Fri 31 Jan 14

ourcoalition says...

Nosfaratu wrote:
Well, so much for living in a place with re-occurring flooding. Move !

On a more serious note, 'pse' watch 'Inside-Out' at 7pm BBC1 Monday 3rd Feb.
The reason why the residents of the South East have constant traffic jams, accidents and appalling road conditions compared to the rest of the country.
And who will buy their house - YOU!!!??? Such a caring comment.
[quote][p][bold]Nosfaratu[/bold] wrote: Well, so much for living in a place with re-occurring flooding. Move ! On a more serious note, 'pse' watch 'Inside-Out' at 7pm BBC1 Monday 3rd Feb. The reason why the residents of the South East have constant traffic jams, accidents and appalling road conditions compared to the rest of the country.[/p][/quote]And who will buy their house - YOU!!!??? Such a caring comment. ourcoalition
  • Score: 7

11:07pm Fri 31 Jan 14

Athena says...

London Road was built over Brighton's hidden river, the Wellesbourne, which used to flow out of Pool Valley from a spring at Patcham. It was intermittent and would be dry in the summer but could flood in the winter, so it was buried underground in pipes. But it is still there and is still liable to flooding.
London Road was built over Brighton's hidden river, the Wellesbourne, which used to flow out of Pool Valley from a spring at Patcham. It was intermittent and would be dry in the summer but could flood in the winter, so it was buried underground in pipes. But it is still there and is still liable to flooding. Athena
  • Score: 5

9:17am Sat 1 Feb 14

Telscombe Cliffy says...

What is the Ordnance Datum? How is it fixed?
What is the Ordnance Datum? How is it fixed? Telscombe Cliffy
  • Score: 2

10:51am Sat 1 Feb 14

getThisCoalitionOut says...

Athena wrote:
London Road was built over Brighton's hidden river, the Wellesbourne, which used to flow out of Pool Valley from a spring at Patcham. It was intermittent and would be dry in the summer but could flood in the winter, so it was buried underground in pipes. But it is still there and is still liable to flooding.
Aren't those the sewers? They come out in the gardens around Pool Valley, I did a school trip when I was a kid and we ended up coming up a ladder into the middle of the gardens where the fountain is!
[quote][p][bold]Athena[/bold] wrote: London Road was built over Brighton's hidden river, the Wellesbourne, which used to flow out of Pool Valley from a spring at Patcham. It was intermittent and would be dry in the summer but could flood in the winter, so it was buried underground in pipes. But it is still there and is still liable to flooding.[/p][/quote]Aren't those the sewers? They come out in the gardens around Pool Valley, I did a school trip when I was a kid and we ended up coming up a ladder into the middle of the gardens where the fountain is! getThisCoalitionOut
  • Score: 0

11:33am Sat 1 Feb 14

Daisyb2uk says...

I remember the floods in the 50s or 60s, Patcham Place was under water for a long time, and the properties in Old London Road were flooded out. As children we thought it was great as we didn't realise the hardship it caused. I remember it came over my Wellingtons.
I remember the floods in the 50s or 60s, Patcham Place was under water for a long time, and the properties in Old London Road were flooded out. As children we thought it was great as we didn't realise the hardship it caused. I remember it came over my Wellingtons. Daisyb2uk
  • Score: 8

11:54am Sat 1 Feb 14

Fight_Back says...

getThisCoalitionOut wrote:
Athena wrote:
London Road was built over Brighton's hidden river, the Wellesbourne, which used to flow out of Pool Valley from a spring at Patcham. It was intermittent and would be dry in the summer but could flood in the winter, so it was buried underground in pipes. But it is still there and is still liable to flooding.
Aren't those the sewers? They come out in the gardens around Pool Valley, I did a school trip when I was a kid and we ended up coming up a ladder into the middle of the gardens where the fountain is!
In some places the pipes and sewers do connect. The hidden river used to flow into a dew pond outside All Saints Church in Patcham ( where there is now a little green. In really wet weather the green becomes rather swamp like. The river then flows down Church Hill and under the Black Lion ( the cellar often used to flood and you could see the plastic crates bobbing about around the beer casks ). The river then makes it's way down the valley floor ( now built over with the Old London Road in Patcham and then the London Road.

Given the river doesn't show up on searches when people buy properties in the area I think it's somewhat naive of anyone to be suggesting it's the residents fault for buying a house there. If anyone is to blame it's those that decided to fill in the dew pond and build over the river.
[quote][p][bold]getThisCoalitionOut[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Athena[/bold] wrote: London Road was built over Brighton's hidden river, the Wellesbourne, which used to flow out of Pool Valley from a spring at Patcham. It was intermittent and would be dry in the summer but could flood in the winter, so it was buried underground in pipes. But it is still there and is still liable to flooding.[/p][/quote]Aren't those the sewers? They come out in the gardens around Pool Valley, I did a school trip when I was a kid and we ended up coming up a ladder into the middle of the gardens where the fountain is![/p][/quote]In some places the pipes and sewers do connect. The hidden river used to flow into a dew pond outside All Saints Church in Patcham ( where there is now a little green. In really wet weather the green becomes rather swamp like. The river then flows down Church Hill and under the Black Lion ( the cellar often used to flood and you could see the plastic crates bobbing about around the beer casks ). The river then makes it's way down the valley floor ( now built over with the Old London Road in Patcham and then the London Road. Given the river doesn't show up on searches when people buy properties in the area I think it's somewhat naive of anyone to be suggesting it's the residents fault for buying a house there. If anyone is to blame it's those that decided to fill in the dew pond and build over the river. Fight_Back
  • Score: 12

6:00pm Sat 1 Feb 14

tez1959 says...

whether its patcham surrey or somerset its not nice getting flooded so have a bit of dignity to those who suffer.
whether its patcham surrey or somerset its not nice getting flooded so have a bit of dignity to those who suffer. tez1959
  • Score: 8

7:51pm Sat 1 Feb 14

PAHCA1 says...

Telscombe Cliffy wrote:
What is the Ordnance Datum? How is it fixed?
It is the average (mean) sea level, taken from readings in Liverpool and Cornwall. AOD means above sea level.
[quote][p][bold]Telscombe Cliffy[/bold] wrote: What is the Ordnance Datum? How is it fixed?[/p][/quote]It is the average (mean) sea level, taken from readings in Liverpool and Cornwall. AOD means above sea level. PAHCA1
  • Score: 2

9:57pm Sat 1 Feb 14

jugglingmoonfish says...

That's why they have not built along the road from the Level (apart from formally St Peters Church) to the pier because of the water... people forgetor are not told about their own local history. Shame...
That's why they have not built along the road from the Level (apart from formally St Peters Church) to the pier because of the water... people forgetor are not told about their own local history. Shame... jugglingmoonfish
  • Score: 5

10:01pm Sat 1 Feb 14

jugglingmoonfish says...

The land has not been built upon from the level. Level ground is the clue...( apart from formally St Peters Church), to the Pier, because of the water. It's a shame we are not taught about our own history and geography, it's interesting...
The land has not been built upon from the level. Level ground is the clue...( apart from formally St Peters Church), to the Pier, because of the water. It's a shame we are not taught about our own history and geography, it's interesting... jugglingmoonfish
  • Score: 6

10:15pm Sat 1 Feb 14

Richada says...

Having, this morning, met a member of the council's adult social care team im my mother's sheltered housing block, I have to say that the council are doing well in order to protect the vulnerable at this very (for senior citezens & other residents alike) stressful time.

We faced the same situation last Christmas when, mercifully, the water level did not rise above its current level. This time however, due to the heavy rain last night and torrential showers today, it looks as though the water levels will continue to rise next week - probably peaking on Wednesday, providing that we do not have more heavy rain during the coming days.

Apparently it takes three days for the rain to percolate to the Patcham area and, specifically, the Wellesbourne stream which runs under the village.

The council is doing everything that it could reasonably be expected to here - the nature of the flooding in the village - i.e. from rising ground water - means that sand bags are of little practical use as they are more likely to trap water in than allow it to flow away.
Having, this morning, met a member of the council's adult social care team im my mother's sheltered housing block, I have to say that the council are doing well in order to protect the vulnerable at this very (for senior citezens & other residents alike) stressful time. We faced the same situation last Christmas when, mercifully, the water level did not rise above its current level. This time however, due to the heavy rain last night and torrential showers today, it looks as though the water levels will continue to rise next week - probably peaking on Wednesday, providing that we do not have more heavy rain during the coming days. Apparently it takes three days for the rain to percolate to the Patcham area and, specifically, the Wellesbourne stream which runs under the village. The council is doing everything that it could reasonably be expected to here - the nature of the flooding in the village - i.e. from rising ground water - means that sand bags are of little practical use as they are more likely to trap water in than allow it to flow away. Richada
  • Score: 1

10:24pm Sat 1 Feb 14

Richada says...

HJarrs wrote:
Good luck to those affected, but reading the Environmental Agency website, this could go on for some time.
Thanks, we appreciate that, I am really pleased to see you taking an interest in a non political issue here. (The first thumbs up youi've had from me!)

Local residents and concerned relaitives like us, can get daily updates of the ground water level from the Patcham Post Office in Old London Road - it is currently being posted in the window there three times a day - a local takes readings and updates the Environment Agency, sadly their website is updated rather less frequently.

And yes, sadly this is going to be a cloud hanging over the residents there for some time - many of whom are very elderly.
[quote][p][bold]HJarrs[/bold] wrote: Good luck to those affected, but reading the Environmental Agency website, this could go on for some time.[/p][/quote]Thanks, we appreciate that, I am really pleased to see you taking an interest in a non political issue here. (The first thumbs up youi've had from me!) Local residents and concerned relaitives like us, can get daily updates of the ground water level from the Patcham Post Office in Old London Road - it is currently being posted in the window there three times a day - a local takes readings and updates the Environment Agency, sadly their website is updated rather less frequently. And yes, sadly this is going to be a cloud hanging over the residents there for some time - many of whom are very elderly. Richada
  • Score: 3

3:18am Sun 2 Feb 14

Athena says...

Fight_Back wrote:
getThisCoalitionOut wrote:
Athena wrote:
London Road was built over Brighton's hidden river, the Wellesbourne, which used to flow out of Pool Valley from a spring at Patcham. It was intermittent and would be dry in the summer but could flood in the winter, so it was buried underground in pipes. But it is still there and is still liable to flooding.
Aren't those the sewers? They come out in the gardens around Pool Valley, I did a school trip when I was a kid and we ended up coming up a ladder into the middle of the gardens where the fountain is!
In some places the pipes and sewers do connect. The hidden river used to flow into a dew pond outside All Saints Church in Patcham ( where there is now a little green. In really wet weather the green becomes rather swamp like. The river then flows down Church Hill and under the Black Lion ( the cellar often used to flood and you could see the plastic crates bobbing about around the beer casks ). The river then makes it's way down the valley floor ( now built over with the Old London Road in Patcham and then the London Road.

Given the river doesn't show up on searches when people buy properties in the area I think it's somewhat naive of anyone to be suggesting it's the residents fault for buying a house there. If anyone is to blame it's those that decided to fill in the dew pond and build over the river.
The decision was made by the Prince Regent, who was fed up with his marshy garden in front of the Pavilion. So he had the river hidden away.
[quote][p][bold]Fight_Back[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]getThisCoalitionOut[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Athena[/bold] wrote: London Road was built over Brighton's hidden river, the Wellesbourne, which used to flow out of Pool Valley from a spring at Patcham. It was intermittent and would be dry in the summer but could flood in the winter, so it was buried underground in pipes. But it is still there and is still liable to flooding.[/p][/quote]Aren't those the sewers? They come out in the gardens around Pool Valley, I did a school trip when I was a kid and we ended up coming up a ladder into the middle of the gardens where the fountain is![/p][/quote]In some places the pipes and sewers do connect. The hidden river used to flow into a dew pond outside All Saints Church in Patcham ( where there is now a little green. In really wet weather the green becomes rather swamp like. The river then flows down Church Hill and under the Black Lion ( the cellar often used to flood and you could see the plastic crates bobbing about around the beer casks ). The river then makes it's way down the valley floor ( now built over with the Old London Road in Patcham and then the London Road. Given the river doesn't show up on searches when people buy properties in the area I think it's somewhat naive of anyone to be suggesting it's the residents fault for buying a house there. If anyone is to blame it's those that decided to fill in the dew pond and build over the river.[/p][/quote]The decision was made by the Prince Regent, who was fed up with his marshy garden in front of the Pavilion. So he had the river hidden away. Athena
  • Score: 2

3:24am Sun 2 Feb 14

Athena says...

What people seem to forget, is that in concreting over our Brighton and Hove cliffs, we are forcing the water to go somewhere else. Rivers, valleys. The same is happening all over the world where concrete displaces water. Think Dubai, Barcelona, Monaco, or anywhere else where a lovely seafront promenade or marina has been created for the benefit of money-spending tourists. All that water should power its way through the shore, but has been moved away, displaced by man, and it has to go somewhere. Somewhere else. NIMBY.
What people seem to forget, is that in concreting over our Brighton and Hove cliffs, we are forcing the water to go somewhere else. Rivers, valleys. The same is happening all over the world where concrete displaces water. Think Dubai, Barcelona, Monaco, or anywhere else where a lovely seafront promenade or marina has been created for the benefit of money-spending tourists. All that water should power its way through the shore, but has been moved away, displaced by man, and it has to go somewhere. Somewhere else. NIMBY. Athena
  • Score: 0

10:04am Sun 2 Feb 14

L bailey says...

The Dew pond in Church Hill dried up when Patcham Pumping station started to abstract water from a water adit north of Patcham. When water started being abstracted it was taken away and as a result the pond dried up. Patcham and Hollingbury Conservation Association have been fighting the Council since June 2012. Our aim is to stop further inappropriate development immediately over the adit and to stop the pollution of one of our main water supplies. When the water is so polluted they will shut down the pumping and all the water will once again flow into the city. The pond in Church Hill will return and Patcham village and the A23 corridor in Patcham will flood on a more regular basis. This is not scaremongering but an actual fact. BHCC are not listening despite having all the facts and concerns made by us known to them..
The Dew pond in Church Hill dried up when Patcham Pumping station started to abstract water from a water adit north of Patcham. When water started being abstracted it was taken away and as a result the pond dried up. Patcham and Hollingbury Conservation Association have been fighting the Council since June 2012. Our aim is to stop further inappropriate development immediately over the adit and to stop the pollution of one of our main water supplies. When the water is so polluted they will shut down the pumping and all the water will once again flow into the city. The pond in Church Hill will return and Patcham village and the A23 corridor in Patcham will flood on a more regular basis. This is not scaremongering but an actual fact. BHCC are not listening despite having all the facts and concerns made by us known to them.. L bailey
  • Score: 7

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