The ArgusBy Jupiter! Ideal conditions in Sussex for planet spotting say astronomers (From The Argus)

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By Jupiter! Ideal conditions in Sussex for planet spotting say astronomers

The Argus: By Jupiter! Ideal conditions in Sussex for planet spotting say astronomers (Pic: NASA) By Jupiter! Ideal conditions in Sussex for planet spotting say astronomers (Pic: NASA)

Look up at the sky on a clear night and you may be lucky enough to spot the largest planet in our solar system.

Viewing conditions for Jupiter are described by astronomers as “ideal” in Sussex over the next few weeks.

To celebrate, Foredown Tower Astronomers will have telescopes in the grounds of the Emmaus centre in Drove Road, Portslade, to show the public what all the fuss is about.

Galileo first spotted Jupiter's moons in 1610. Jupiter itself can be seen high in the sky between the constellations of Orion, familiarly recognised by spotting Orion’s Belt, and Gemini.

George Hurrion, of Foredown Tower Astronomers, said: “It’s almost directly overhead and the brightest thing you can see.

“If it’s clear you might be able to see some of its moons and the belt that goes round it.”

Anyone interested in viewing Jupiter can do so on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday, from 7pm to 9pm each evening.


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Comments (1)

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3:16pm Sat 1 Mar 14

RussellR says...

The constellation of Orion is not 'familiarly known as Orion’s Belt'. The belt is part of the constellation.

Orion is the Hunter, and Gemini is also known as the Twins.
Also - Galileo was not the first to spot Jupiter, as it had been known to the Babylonians as Marduk and Zeus to the Ancient Greeks.

In 1610 Galileo pointed his rudimentary telescope at Jupiter and realised that it had four large moons.

Not good for a six line paragraph - but full marks this time to The Argus for not confusing the science of Astronomy with Astrology!!
The constellation of Orion is not 'familiarly known as Orion’s Belt'. The belt is part of the constellation. Orion is the Hunter, and Gemini is also known as the Twins. Also - Galileo was not the first to spot Jupiter, as it had been known to the Babylonians as Marduk and Zeus to the Ancient Greeks. In 1610 Galileo pointed his rudimentary telescope at Jupiter and realised that it had four large moons. Not good for a six line paragraph - but full marks this time to The Argus for not confusing the science of Astronomy with Astrology!! RussellR
  • Score: 5

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