The ArgusBrighton hospital trust tells staff to keep quiet (From The Argus)

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Brighton hospital trust tells staff to keep quiet

The Argus: picture by Trontnort on Flickr picture by Trontnort on Flickr

Hospital workers are being encouraged to keep the noise down so patients can enjoy a good night's sleep.

The Shshshsh, it's night time campaign is being launched on wards at hospitals in Brighton and Haywards Heath.

It follows feedback from patient surveys which highlighted concerns raised by people about being kept awake at night.

Comments included noise in the corridors from trolleys and wheelchairs and noisy hand driers in the toilets.

There were also concerns about bleeps going off, doors banging and waste bins clanging shut.

In a message to staff, Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals NHS Trust chief nurse Sherree Fagge (crct) said: “One pledge we want to introduce across the whole trust involves trying to reduce the noise on inpatient areas at night.

“We want all staff who work at night to play their part in keeping the noise at night down.

“This campaign comes as a result of feedback we received through Patients' Voice.

“Over the last 14 months, noise at night has been mentioned 59 times, so this is something we really do need to focus on improving.

“Are the bins in your ward or department soft closing? Do you always wear soft sole shoes? Are doors to areas where people talk kept closed?

“Some noise cannot be helped but it only takes a few minor adjustments to ensure that it is kept to a minimum.”

The trust runs the Royal Sussex County Hospital and the Sussex Eye Hospital in Brighton and Princess Royal Hospital in Haywards Heath among others.

A similar campaign introduced by Western Sussex Hospitals NHS Trust last year led to a marked improvement on the wards for patients at Worthing Hospital and St Richard's Hospital in Chichester.

The trust said a patient survey reported that 64% of inpatients said they were able to sleep without noticing any noise, compared to fewer than 50% when the trust's survey first started in early 2012.

Comments (2)

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6:58am Wed 12 Mar 14

We are the 99% says...

Following an accident a few years ago, I ended up in hospital!
During the night, I was woken every few hours (seemed liked hourly), for blood pressure checks or whatever!
Then there was the constant banging and crashing of staff which seemed to go on all night!
In the morning when we had no choice about waking, and those capable of getting out of bed, sat in chair by their beds!
I used to put my pillow on the bed side dinner table that slid over the bed, and try tried to get some sleep!
Nursing staff, noticed I was drowsy, so I was kept in for days!
I wasn't drowsy!
I just wanted to get some sleep that I wasn't getting at night!
Following an accident a few years ago, I ended up in hospital! During the night, I was woken every few hours (seemed liked hourly), for blood pressure checks or whatever! Then there was the constant banging and crashing of staff which seemed to go on all night! In the morning when we had no choice about waking, and those capable of getting out of bed, sat in chair by their beds! I used to put my pillow on the bed side dinner table that slid over the bed, and try tried to get some sleep! Nursing staff, noticed I was drowsy, so I was kept in for days! I wasn't drowsy! I just wanted to get some sleep that I wasn't getting at night! We are the 99%
  • Score: 6

8:49am Wed 12 Mar 14

Morpheus says...

Nothing changes. Fortunately I have only needed one stay in hospital and than was in the 70's. A good night's sleep is what we all need at any time and especially if we are ill. There is only one way to achieve this in hospital and that is with a private room. The NHS still operates as if it was Victorian times.
Nothing changes. Fortunately I have only needed one stay in hospital and than was in the 70's. A good night's sleep is what we all need at any time and especially if we are ill. There is only one way to achieve this in hospital and that is with a private room. The NHS still operates as if it was Victorian times. Morpheus
  • Score: 5

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