The ArgusFewer Brighton and Hove parents get primary school place of choice (From The Argus)

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Fewer Brighton and Hove parents get primary school place of choice

The Argus: Fewer Brighton and Hove parents get primary school place of choice Fewer Brighton and Hove parents get primary school place of choice

Thousands of parents find out if their child has a place at their preferred primary school today.

In Brighton and Hove more than 94% of schoolchildren have been offered one of their three preferred schools in this year's primary age admissions round.

A total of 82.5% were offered their first preference, down from 84% last year.

And 169 children have not been offered any of their three preferences, representing 5.8% - up from 4.85% last year.

Their parents must now wait for the council to find their closest school with places.

Pressure areas include the south of Hove and Saltdean.

The council said it had created 345 new reception class places since 2005 in areas of greatest demand to try and combat the problem.

And this year will see a new form of entry at West Hove Infant School as well as a controversial bulge class at Davigdor Infant School.

This year the city saw an increase in applicants from 2,763 in 2013/14 to 2,933.

The rise was expected with the number of children at primary school age in Brighton and Hove likely to peak in 2015.

Pinaki Ghoshal, Brighton and Hove City Council's director of children's services, , said: “I'm pleased that we have been able to offer such a high proportion of parents one of their preferred schools, particularly given that the number of applications is up by 170 this year.”

In East Sussex 86% of pupils got their first choice, down from 87.7% last year, while 5% got none of their choices, up from 4.8% last year.

East Sussex saw a rise in applications from 5,311 last year to 5,590.

In West Sussex, 89.96% of applicants - including those made late - were offered their first choice, down slightly from 90% last year, while 97.15% were offered one of their three preferences - down from 97.3% last year.

In total West Sussex offered 11,216 places, up from 11,099 places in 2013. Of these 10,890 were applications made on time, 295 were late applications and 31 children have been allocated a place though no application was received.

Today is the first so-called “national offer day” for primary schools when parents across the country find out about their applications.

Have you got your preferred school? If not, how far will your child have to travel to school?

We want to hear how the primary school places issue has affected you. Call reporter Peter Truman on 01273 544682 or email peter.truman@theargus.co.uk.

Comments (10)

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9:53am Wed 16 Apr 14

rayellerton says...

I went to the nearest school, and chose the nearest for my kids. A lot of parents are snobbish about which school they choose but its not about them. By going to the nearest children can be walked to school which is better for them, they get to be friends with other kids who also live in the same area as well. The Ofsted league table have a lot to answer for imo..
I went to the nearest school, and chose the nearest for my kids. A lot of parents are snobbish about which school they choose but its not about them. By going to the nearest children can be walked to school which is better for them, they get to be friends with other kids who also live in the same area as well. The Ofsted league table have a lot to answer for imo.. rayellerton
  • Score: 9

10:09am Wed 16 Apr 14

Twilekswg says...

Sorry but this is 2014 NOT 1954. Most parents commute to work and yes WOMAN actually work so the closest school is not the best for their children or families. This is an ancient system that does not meet the needs of the modern family.
Sorry but this is 2014 NOT 1954. Most parents commute to work and yes WOMAN actually work so the closest school is not the best for their children or families. This is an ancient system that does not meet the needs of the modern family. Twilekswg
  • Score: -13

10:13am Wed 16 Apr 14

rayellerton says...

Twilekswg wrote:
Sorry but this is 2014 NOT 1954. Most parents commute to work and yes WOMAN actually work so the closest school is not the best for their children or families. This is an ancient system that does not meet the needs of the modern family.
But did you see..i chose the nearest in the 90's when my kids started. If you are a parent your kids should come first, and you should do what is best for them not your career!
[quote][p][bold]Twilekswg[/bold] wrote: Sorry but this is 2014 NOT 1954. Most parents commute to work and yes WOMAN actually work so the closest school is not the best for their children or families. This is an ancient system that does not meet the needs of the modern family.[/p][/quote]But did you see..i chose the nearest in the 90's when my kids started. If you are a parent your kids should come first, and you should do what is best for them not your career! rayellerton
  • Score: 5

11:23am Wed 16 Apr 14

andrewedmondson says...

Bearing in mind that around 37% of primary schools are religious, many parents have to choose between their local religious school and a remote community school.

I sympathise with rayeallerton. In our village of Balcombe there is a single primary Church of England school. No choice here. This should be a fully inclusive community school that can serve the needs of all residents. Many parents would like their children to attend the local school, with all of the associated benefits.

Instead, parents are forced to travel, all in the name of choice, which is ironic because there is no choice in most villages.
Bearing in mind that around 37% of primary schools are religious, many parents have to choose between their local religious school and a remote community school. I sympathise with rayeallerton. In our village of Balcombe there is a single primary Church of England school. No choice here. This should be a fully inclusive community school that can serve the needs of all residents. Many parents would like their children to attend the local school, with all of the associated benefits. Instead, parents are forced to travel, all in the name of choice, which is ironic because there is no choice in most villages. andrewedmondson
  • Score: -1

2:29pm Wed 16 Apr 14

rayellerton says...

Well Andrew, although i support the right of anyones beliefs....schooling should be secular and equal for all, when kids grow up to adults then it should be their own informed decision to decide what religion to follow, or not. I am not keen on indoctrination from a young age...it is almost a form of bullying.
Well Andrew, although i support the right of anyones beliefs....schooling should be secular and equal for all, when kids grow up to adults then it should be their own informed decision to decide what religion to follow, or not. I am not keen on indoctrination from a young age...it is almost a form of bullying. rayellerton
  • Score: 1

6:44pm Wed 16 Apr 14

Sir Prised says...

rayellerton wrote:
Well Andrew, although i support the right of anyones beliefs....schooling should be secular and equal for all, when kids grow up to adults then it should be their own informed decision to decide what religion to follow, or not. I am not keen on indoctrination from a young age...it is almost a form of bullying.
Couldn't agree more. Religion is a purely personal thing and should be kept out of general education. Having said that, there should be classes on good citizenship and personal responsibility. Also all schools should be under State control and have no parental influence whatsioever. All parents do is favour activities which advantage their own children, which means children of disinterested parents are further disadvantaged. Neither should we tolerate good schools and bad schools. For God's sake we've been running an education system here for long enough to know what comprises a good education. If the teachers can't provide it, they should go, as should be the case in any other job. We once had it so right but threw it all away on the altar of political correctness, where no one could be seen to fail! Some people aren't a clever as others, fact and to pretend otherwise betrays both the individual and the country's economy.
[quote][p][bold]rayellerton[/bold] wrote: Well Andrew, although i support the right of anyones beliefs....schooling should be secular and equal for all, when kids grow up to adults then it should be their own informed decision to decide what religion to follow, or not. I am not keen on indoctrination from a young age...it is almost a form of bullying.[/p][/quote]Couldn't agree more. Religion is a purely personal thing and should be kept out of general education. Having said that, there should be classes on good citizenship and personal responsibility. Also all schools should be under State control and have no parental influence whatsioever. All parents do is favour activities which advantage their own children, which means children of disinterested parents are further disadvantaged. Neither should we tolerate good schools and bad schools. For God's sake we've been running an education system here for long enough to know what comprises a good education. If the teachers can't provide it, they should go, as should be the case in any other job. We once had it so right but threw it all away on the altar of political correctness, where no one could be seen to fail! Some people aren't a clever as others, fact and to pretend otherwise betrays both the individual and the country's economy. Sir Prised
  • Score: 1

9:28pm Wed 16 Apr 14

Brighton Living says...

OH NO Really ...... sign of the times I'm afraid 'house prices up and wages down comes to mind'
OH NO Really ...... sign of the times I'm afraid 'house prices up and wages down comes to mind' Brighton Living
  • Score: 1

6:42am Thu 17 Apr 14

Plantpot says...

You are not given a choice about where your child goes to school, you are invited to express a preference.

If you desperately want a certain school for your kids, if they aren't special needs or a sibling already in a certain school, you need to move to give yourself the best chance.

The real issue of course is why school quality varies from school to school such that parents feel desperate if their kids don't get to a certain school. And very often that difference isn't down to teaching, it's the parents that send their kids to a certain school that really make the difference.
You are not given a choice about where your child goes to school, you are invited to express a preference. If you desperately want a certain school for your kids, if they aren't special needs or a sibling already in a certain school, you need to move to give yourself the best chance. The real issue of course is why school quality varies from school to school such that parents feel desperate if their kids don't get to a certain school. And very often that difference isn't down to teaching, it's the parents that send their kids to a certain school that really make the difference. Plantpot
  • Score: 1

9:40am Thu 17 Apr 14

bythepark says...

We live near Hove park and got none of our 3 choices whice were Goldstone (0.789 miles away), Hangleton (1.047 miles away) and West Hove which is also under a mile away. The others near us are faith schools so we had very little chance of getting into those. We have been allocated West Blatchington which I believe has the 2nd worst primary record in Brighton & Hove. We are now going private, not because we are snobbish but we got none of our choices which were the 3 closest to us and have ended up being given a school that others don't want to go to because of its record and is further away than the private school.
We live near Hove park and got none of our 3 choices whice were Goldstone (0.789 miles away), Hangleton (1.047 miles away) and West Hove which is also under a mile away. The others near us are faith schools so we had very little chance of getting into those. We have been allocated West Blatchington which I believe has the 2nd worst primary record in Brighton & Hove. We are now going private, not because we are snobbish but we got none of our choices which were the 3 closest to us and have ended up being given a school that others don't want to go to because of its record and is further away than the private school. bythepark
  • Score: 0

9:49am Thu 17 Apr 14

andrewedmondson says...

There must be many stories like bythepark's.

Faith schools distort the allocation of school places and increase pressure on local resources.

The Fair Admissions Campaign is well underway now. The aim is to get rid of religious discrimination in school admissions. This is national campaign that is also encouraging local people start local campaigns. You can visit it here http://fairadmission
s.org.uk/

Yesterday David Cameron said this is a Christian country. No wonder 37% of publicly funded primary schools are religious and on the rise. It's time to stop this abuse of power and make all publicly funded schools fully inclusive.

I don't want my hard-earned taxes paying for religious organisations to promote their religions and discriminate against us.
There must be many stories like bythepark's. Faith schools distort the allocation of school places and increase pressure on local resources. The Fair Admissions Campaign is well underway now. The aim is to get rid of religious discrimination in school admissions. This is national campaign that is also encouraging local people start local campaigns. You can visit it here http://fairadmission s.org.uk/ Yesterday David Cameron said this is a Christian country. No wonder 37% of publicly funded primary schools are religious and on the rise. It's time to stop this abuse of power and make all publicly funded schools fully inclusive. I don't want my hard-earned taxes paying for religious organisations to promote their religions and discriminate against us. andrewedmondson
  • Score: 0

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