Bullied pupils get lower grades

Bullied pupils get lower grades

Bullied pupils get lower grades

First published in News
Last updated
by , Health reporter

Bullying is having a significant impact on academic performance and is leading pupils to achieve lower grades at GCSE level, according to new research.

The Annual Bullying Survey, published by Brighton-based anti-bullying charity Ditch the Label, has highlighted a direct correlation between bullying and the negative impact it has on education.

The report points out areas of concern, those most at risk and the long-term impact bullying is having on the lives of millions of young people.

More than 30 schools and colleges around the country were involved in the study, which is based on the answers of 3,600 people aged 13 to 18.


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It showed 56% of bullied pupils felt it was having a detrimental impact on their education, and those experiencing bullying were more likely to achieve a grade D or below at GCSE level.

Pupils achieving an A* or A grade in English were more likely to have never been bullied, with 41% claiming they had received the top marks.

Only 26% of those being bullied received an A* or A grade, according to the report.

The trends were also similar across the subjects of science and maths.

The report found 45% of young people had experienced bullying before the age of 18, with the majority being mocked about their personal appearance.

A further 61% said they had been physically attacked, with 30% going on to self-harm and 10% saying they had attempted suicide.

Liam Hackett, founder and chief executive officer of Ditch the Label, said: “Our survey shows the profound effect bullying is having upon the studies, self-esteem and future prospects of millions of young people across the UK.

“It is my hope that our research, message and intervention programs will be used not only to raise awareness of the severity of bullying but will also help us to reframe the prejudices and perceptions within wider society.”

Professor Ian Rivers, an expert in human development and the head of the School of Sport and Education at Brunel University, said: “Very able pupils are disadvantaged by their constant experiences of bullying and this ultimately means that schools that fail to tackle bullying effectively will also face questions from Ofsted as grades decline.

“Taken cumulatively, this report shows that we have still got a great deal to do to ensure that our young people are safe in our schools and able to learn in a supportive educational environment.”

Ditch the Label works with schools and colleges and supports thousands of vulnerable young people, both online and offline.

Comments (3)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

9:00am Thu 17 Apr 14

puddingandpi says...

No sh1t, Sherlock.
No sh1t, Sherlock. puddingandpi
  • Score: 1

3:16pm Thu 17 Apr 14

GloriaR says...

To try to help combat bullying, songs can teach children about kindness and tolerance. The song “Be a Buddy, not a Bully” can be heard on YouTube:
http://www.youtube.c
om/watch?v=Or7WPUtUn
Ro
To try to help combat bullying, songs can teach children about kindness and tolerance. The song “Be a Buddy, not a Bully” can be heard on YouTube: http://www.youtube.c om/watch?v=Or7WPUtUn Ro GloriaR
  • Score: 0

1:17am Fri 18 Apr 14

whatevernext2013 says...

GloriaR wrote:
To try to help combat bullying, songs can teach children about kindness and tolerance. The song “Be a Buddy, not a Bully” can be heard on YouTube:
http://www.youtube.c

om/watch?v=Or7WPUtUn

Ro
what planet are you on ,as its clearly not planet earth
[quote][p][bold]GloriaR[/bold] wrote: To try to help combat bullying, songs can teach children about kindness and tolerance. The song “Be a Buddy, not a Bully” can be heard on YouTube: http://www.youtube.c om/watch?v=Or7WPUtUn Ro[/p][/quote]what planet are you on ,as its clearly not planet earth whatevernext2013
  • Score: 0

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