The ArgusLuke Maddran jailed for 14 years after attacking pair with baseball bat in Hove home (From The Argus)

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Luke Maddran jailed for 14 years after attacking pair with baseball bat in Hove home

The Argus: JAILED: Luke Maddran JAILED: Luke Maddran

Two people were left “fearing for their lives” after being attacked by two men who burst into their home armed with a baseball bat.

Now one of the offenders, Luke Maddran, has been jailed for 14 years while the other attacker remains at large.

Maddran, 27, of Brighton Road, Worthing, appeared at Lewes Crown Court for sentencing after being convicted of two counts of robbery following successful fingerprint identification.

While he pleaded guilty to the robbery, he did not reveal who committed it with him.

The court was told the victims, a man and a woman, were threatened in their flat in Portland Road, Hove, on September 14 last year by two men who forced their way in and assaulted the man.

The man suffered minor injuries and the robbers escaped with laptops, a camera, £1,500 in cash and a large amount of DJ equipment in suitcases.

Officers identified Maddran as one of those involved after finding his fingerprints at the scene.

The second robber is still to be identified.

Detective Constable Brad Lozynski said: “Maddran was a serial offender who had no problem using violence to get what he wanted.

“He and his accomplice, who we are still trying to identify, subjected their victims to a terrifying ordeal in which they feared for their lives.

“Good use of intelligence and forensic techniques helped us catch and convict Maddran, which makes sure we will not see him in Sussex for many years.”

Anyone with information about the second person should call 101 quoting serial 72 of 15/9/13, email 101@sussex.pnn. police.uk or call Crimestoppers anonymously on 0800 555111.

Comments (6)

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10:08am Tue 29 Apr 14

brightonaire says...

They should withold parole till he names his accomplice
They should withold parole till he names his accomplice brightonaire
  • Score: 7

10:14am Tue 29 Apr 14

JerryOnly says...

brightonaire wrote:
They should withold parole till he names his accomplice
They should withhold parole.
[quote][p][bold]brightonaire[/bold] wrote: They should withold parole till he names his accomplice[/p][/quote]They should withhold parole. JerryOnly
  • Score: 7

10:39am Tue 29 Apr 14

Bill in Hanover says...

brightonaire wrote:
They should withold parole till he names his accomplice
A few years ago he would have been sentenced to 'hard labour' for witholding the name, hard labour would have just meant that he served every day of the sentence.
[quote][p][bold]brightonaire[/bold] wrote: They should withold parole till he names his accomplice[/p][/quote]A few years ago he would have been sentenced to 'hard labour' for witholding the name, hard labour would have just meant that he served every day of the sentence. Bill in Hanover
  • Score: 3

10:17pm Tue 29 Apr 14

Maxwell's Ghost says...

What an appropriate surname for a madman.
What an appropriate surname for a madman. Maxwell's Ghost
  • Score: 0

10:23pm Tue 29 Apr 14

ghost bus driver says...

Bill in Hanover wrote:
brightonaire wrote:
They should withold parole till he names his accomplice
A few years ago he would have been sentenced to 'hard labour' for witholding the name, hard labour would have just meant that he served every day of the sentence.
Although when the term was first introduced it meant exactly that, the term being penal servitude, doing degrading, demeaning work, such as operating a treadmill with how hard it was to turn set by a tensioning screw set by the prison officer, hence where the term 'screw' came from.

Imprisonment with hard labour was abolished by section 1(2) of the Criminal Justice Act 1948, replacing it with Penal Servitude.
[quote][p][bold]Bill in Hanover[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]brightonaire[/bold] wrote: They should withold parole till he names his accomplice[/p][/quote]A few years ago he would have been sentenced to 'hard labour' for witholding the name, hard labour would have just meant that he served every day of the sentence.[/p][/quote]Although when the term was first introduced it meant exactly that, the term being penal servitude, doing degrading, demeaning work, such as operating a treadmill with how hard it was to turn set by a tensioning screw set by the prison officer, hence where the term 'screw' came from. Imprisonment with hard labour was abolished by section 1(2) of the Criminal Justice Act 1948, replacing it with Penal Servitude. ghost bus driver
  • Score: 0

10:29pm Tue 29 Apr 14

ghost bus driver says...

I just googled it, Wikipedia has this to say:

"Labour was sometimes useful. In Inveraray Jail from 1839 prisoners worked up to ten hours a day. Most male prisoners made herring nets or picked oakum (Inveraray was a busy herring port); those with skills were often employed where the skills could be used, such as shoemaking, tailoring or joinery. Female prisoners picked oakum, knitted stockings or sewed.

Forms of labour for punishment included the treadmill, shot drill, and the crank machine.

Treadmills for punishment were used in prisons in Britain from 1818; they were like 20-foot paddle wheels with 24 steps around a six-foot cylinder. Prisoners had to work six or more hours a day, climbing 5,000 to 14,000 vertical feet. While the purpose was mainly punitive, the mill could grind grain, pump water, or ventilate.

Shot drill involved stooping without bending the knees, lifting a heavy cannonball slowly to chest height, taking three steps to the right, replacing it on the ground, stepping back three paces, and repeating, moving cannonballs from one pile to another.

The crank machine was a machine with a handle that forced four large cups or ladles through sand inside a drum, doing nothing useful. Male prisoners had to turn the handle 14,400 times a day, as registered on a dial. The warder could make the task harder by tightening a screw, hence the slang term "screw" for prison warder."

So I was nearly right...
I just googled it, Wikipedia has this to say: "Labour was sometimes useful. In Inveraray Jail from 1839 prisoners worked up to ten hours a day. Most male prisoners made herring nets or picked oakum (Inveraray was a busy herring port); those with skills were often employed where the skills could be used, such as shoemaking, tailoring or joinery. Female prisoners picked oakum, knitted stockings or sewed.[1] Forms of labour for punishment included the treadmill, shot drill, and the crank machine.[1] Treadmills for punishment were used in prisons in Britain from 1818; they were like 20-foot paddle wheels with 24 steps around a six-foot cylinder. Prisoners had to work six or more hours a day, climbing 5,000 to 14,000 vertical feet. While the purpose was mainly punitive, the mill could grind grain, pump water, or ventilate.[2] Shot drill involved stooping without bending the knees, lifting a heavy cannonball slowly to chest height, taking three steps to the right, replacing it on the ground, stepping back three paces, and repeating, moving cannonballs from one pile to another.[1] The crank machine was a machine with a handle that forced four large cups or ladles through sand inside a drum, doing nothing useful. Male prisoners had to turn the handle 14,400 times a day, as registered on a dial. The warder could make the task harder by tightening a screw, hence the slang term "screw" for prison warder." So I was nearly right... ghost bus driver
  • Score: 0

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