The ArgusSea of blue spotted off one of Sussex’s busiest roads (From The Argus)

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Sea of blue spotted off one of Sussex’s busiest roads

The Argus: Sea of blue spotted off one of Sussex’s busiest roads Sea of blue spotted off one of Sussex’s busiest roads

This sea of blue has appeared off one of Sussex’s busiest roads.

The flowers have bloomed to create the colourful covering just north of the A27 on the outskirts of Brighton.

The purple patch, visible from Ditchling Road, is thought to be flax flowers – a plant first used by pre-historic man 30,000 years ago to help fight infections.

Last year, researchers found that fibres from the common flax plant can kill bacteria efficiently when treated with special light- sensitive dyes and exposed to red light.

Academics at the University of Brighton said the approach could, for example, reduce contamination on bed linen and patients’ clothes from bacteria including MRSA.

Flax absorbs some light-sensitive dyes with a greater capacity than the most commonly used material, cotton.

After stimulation with red light, the dyes produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) that kill bacteria.

ROS – chemically – reactive molecules containing oxygen - attack in several different ways, which means bacteria is less likely to develop resistance to the treatment, unlike antibiotics.

Comments (6)

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5:57pm Tue 1 Jul 14

stevo!! says...

"Last year, researchers found that fibres from the common flax plant can kill bacteria efficiently when treated with special light- sensitive dyes and exposed to red light. "

And pre-historic man could do that without fancy lights and special dyes...

Isn't progress lovely?
"Last year, researchers found that fibres from the common flax plant can kill bacteria efficiently when treated with special light- sensitive dyes and exposed to red light. " And pre-historic man could do that without fancy lights and special dyes... Isn't progress lovely? stevo!!
  • Score: -2

8:30pm Tue 1 Jul 14

Morpheus says...

So who planted the flax?
So who planted the flax? Morpheus
  • Score: 5

9:34am Wed 2 Jul 14

hubby says...

Very pretty as well!
Very pretty as well! hubby
  • Score: 3

10:14am Wed 2 Jul 14

Mrs Newcastle says...

Morpheus wrote:
So who planted the flax?
I have a recipe for using flax seed oil, make a dressing with lemon juice, vinegar and flax seed oil and then add raw grated beetroot,mixed together and sprinkle on top of salads etc, Far to many to list all the health benefits of flax seed oil or beetroot
[quote][p][bold]Morpheus[/bold] wrote: So who planted the flax?[/p][/quote]I have a recipe for using flax seed oil, make a dressing with lemon juice, vinegar and flax seed oil and then add raw grated beetroot,mixed together and sprinkle on top of salads etc, Far to many to list all the health benefits of flax seed oil or beetroot Mrs Newcastle
  • Score: 0

11:33am Wed 2 Jul 14

flaxland says...

It is likely to be a field of linseed - grown for the oil content of the seeds. The flax fibre comes from the stalks and is from a different variety to the seed type (grows taller and less seed bolls). Where is it exactly? have a look at website: www.flaxland.co.uk for more information on flax for fibre and www.thelinseedfarm.c
o.uk for oil and seed.
It is likely to be a field of linseed - grown for the oil content of the seeds. The flax fibre comes from the stalks and is from a different variety to the seed type (grows taller and less seed bolls). Where is it exactly? have a look at website: www.flaxland.co.uk for more information on flax for fibre and www.thelinseedfarm.c o.uk for oil and seed. flaxland
  • Score: 0

12:56pm Wed 2 Jul 14

Mrs Newcastle says...

flaxland wrote:
It is likely to be a field of linseed - grown for the oil content of the seeds. The flax fibre comes from the stalks and is from a different variety to the seed type (grows taller and less seed bolls). Where is it exactly? have a look at website: www.flaxland.co.uk for more information on flax for fibre and www.thelinseedfarm.c

o.uk for oil and seed.
Another thing i like is Linseed tea , really easily to make just heat up a couple a tea spoon of seeds with a litre of water simmer for about 10 mins and drain, helps with gall bladder problems, heat sensitivities ,re-hydrating for the body, sore mouth hot flushes, itchy skin, tiredness and makes my hair and skin shinning and soft
[quote][p][bold]flaxland[/bold] wrote: It is likely to be a field of linseed - grown for the oil content of the seeds. The flax fibre comes from the stalks and is from a different variety to the seed type (grows taller and less seed bolls). Where is it exactly? have a look at website: www.flaxland.co.uk for more information on flax for fibre and www.thelinseedfarm.c o.uk for oil and seed.[/p][/quote]Another thing i like is Linseed tea , really easily to make just heat up a couple a tea spoon of seeds with a litre of water simmer for about 10 mins and drain, helps with gall bladder problems, heat sensitivities ,re-hydrating for the body, sore mouth hot flushes, itchy skin, tiredness and makes my hair and skin shinning and soft Mrs Newcastle
  • Score: -2
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