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Strike action to close scores of Sussex schools

The Argus: Strike action to close scores of schools Strike action to close scores of schools

Here is the list of schools that have announced that they are to close or partially close tomorrow due to strike action by the NUT, GMB, UNISON, UNITE, FBU and PCS.

Parents are being advised to contact the relevant school for further confirmation of openings.

 

In Brighton and Hove:

 

Secondary and special schools

Blatchington Mill School and Sixth Form College 

Brighton and Hove Pupil Referral Unit 

Cardinal Newman Catholic School

Dorothy Stringer School

Downs Park School

Downs View Special School

Hillside School

Homewood College

Hove Park School and Sixth Form Centre

Longhill High School

Patcham High School

Patcham House Special School

The Cedar Centre

The Connected Hub

Varndean School

Primary schools

Aldrington CofE Primary School

Balfour Primary School

Bevendean Primary School

Brackenbury Primary School

Carden Primary School

Carlton Hill Primary School

Coombe Road Primary School

Cottesmore St Mary's Catholic Primary School

Davigdor Infant School

Downs Infant School

Downs Junior School

Elm Grove Primary School

Fairlight Primary School (Reception class will be open)

Goldstone Primary School

Hangleton Infant School

Hangleton Junior School

Hertford Infant and Nursery School

Hertford Junior School

Middle Street Primary School

Mile Oak Primary School

Moulsecoomb Primary School

Our Lady of Lourdes RC School

Patcham Infant School

Patcham Junior School

Peter Gladwin Primary School

Queen's Park Primary School

Royal Spa Nursery School

Rudyard Kipling Primary School

Saltdean Primary School

Somerhill Junior School

St Andrew's CofE (Aided) Primary School

St Bartholomew's CofE Primary School

St Bernadette's Catholic Primary School

St John the Baptist Catholic Primary School

St Joseph's Catholic Primary School

St Luke's Primary School

St Margaret's CofE Primary School, Rottingdean

St Mark's CofE Primary School

St Martin's CofE Primary School

St Mary Magdalen Catholic Primary School

St Mary's Catholic Primary School (open to year 1 and year 6 pupils)

St Nicolas' CofE Primary School

St Paul's CofE Primary School and Nursery

St Peter's Community Primary School

Stanford Infant School

Stanford Junior School

Tarnerland Nursery School

West Blatchington Primary and Nursery School (the Year 2 and Year 6 school trips will go ahead as planned)

West Hove Infant School

West Hove Junior School

Westdene Primary School

Woodingdean Primary School

 

In West Sussex: 

 

Aldingbourne Primary School

Arunside School (Horsham) Partial Closure

Billingshurst Primary School P/C

Birdham CofE Primary School P/C

Bosham Primary School

Buckingham Park Primary School

Chichester Nursery School

Downlands Community School

Downsbrook Middle School

Durrington First School

Durrington High School P/C

Durrington Middle School

Felpham Community College P/C

Field Place First School

Fordwater School (Chichester) P/C

Glebe Primary School, The

Hassocks Infant School P/C

Heene CofE First School

Herons Dale Primary School

Holy Trinity CofE Secondary School (Crawley)

Imberhorne School P/C

Laurels First School, The (Worthing)

London Meed Community Primary School P/C

Lyndhurst First School

Manor Field Primary School

Northgate Primary School P/C

Seaside Primary School P/C

Slindon CofE Primary School P/C

South Bersted CofE Primary School P/C

Southgate Primary School

Southway Junior School (Burgess Hill)

St Anthony's School P/C

St Margaret's CofE Primary School (Angmering) P/C

St Peter's CofE Primary School (Henfield) P/C

St Philip's Catholic Primary School (Arundel) P/C

St Wilfrid's Catholic Primary School (Burgess Hill) P/C

Storrington First School P/C

Swiss Gardens Primary School

Upper Beeding Primary School

Vale First and Middle School (Worthing) P/C

Weald School, The

West Green Primary School

Windmills Junior School, The

Woodlands Meed School

 

In East Sussex:

 

Partly closed schools: 

 

All Saints C of E Primary School 

Chantry Community Primary School, Bexhill 

Chiddingly Primary School

Churchwood Community Primary School, St Leonards 

Chyngton School, Seaford 

Framfield Church of England Primary School 

Grove Park School, Crowborough 

Grovelands Community School, Hailsham 

Hailsham Community College Academy Trust 

Harbour Primary & Nursery School, Newhaven 

Heathfield Community College 

Langney Primary School 

Laughton Community Primary School 

Pashley Down Infant School, Eastbourne 

Pevensey and Westham Church of England Primary School 

Ratton School Academy Trust, Eastbourne 

Robertsbridge Community College 

Saxon Mount School, St Leonards

Sir Henry Fermor Church of England Primary School, Crowborough 

St Mary the Virgin Church of England Primary School, Hartfield 

St Mary's School Horam, Maynards Green 

St Michael's Church of England Primary School, Playden 

St Michael's Primary School, Withyham

The Lindfield School, Eastbourne 

The St Leonards Academy, St Leonards

The St Leonards Academy 

Uckfield Community Technology College

West Rise Community Infant School, Eastbourne 

West Rise Junior School, Eastbourne 

Willingdon Community School, Eastbourne 

 


Closed tomorrow:

 

Alfriston School

Annecy Catholic Primary School, Seaford 

Battle and Langton Church of England Primary School

Blacklands Primary School, Hastings 

Bourne Primary School, Eastbourne

Brede Primary School, Broad Oak 

Catsfield Church of England Primary School 

Chailey School, South Chailey 

Claverham Community College, Battle 

Cradle Hill Community Primary School, Seaford 

Crowhurst Church of England Primary School 

Denton Community School, Newhaven closed

Ditchling (St Margaret's) Church of England Primary School

Dudley Infant Academy, Hastings 

Hawkes Farm Primary School, Hailsham 

Hellingly Community Primary School 

Herstmonceux Church of England Primary School

Little Ridge Community Primary School, St Leonards

Marshlands Primary School, Hailsham 

Meridian Primary School, Peacehaven 

Motcombe Community School, Eastbourne 

Ocklynge Junior School, Eastbourne

Park Mead Primary School, Hailsham 

Peacehaven Community School 

Peacehaven Heights Primary School

Pells Church of England Primary School, Lewes 

Plumpton Primary School, Plumpton Green 

Priory School, Lewes 

Ringmer Primary School 

Robsack Wood Community Primary School, St Leonards

Rye College 

Rye Community Primary School 

Seahaven Academy, Newhaven 

Shinewater Primary School, Eastbourne 

Silverdale Primary School, St Leonards

South Malling Church of England Primary School, Lewes 

Southover Church of England Primary School, Lewes 

St Andrew's Church of England Infant School, Eastbourne

St Mary Magdalene Catholic Primary School, Bexhill

St Mary's Catholic Primary School, Crowborough

St Paul's Church Of England Primary School, St Leonards

St Philip's Catholic Primary School, Uckfield 

Stafford Junior School, Eastbourne 

Staplecross Methodist Primary School, Robertsbridge

Stone Cross School 

Telscombe Cliffs Community Primary School 

The Bishop Bell Church Of England School, Eastbourne 

The South Downs Community Special School, Eastbourne

Tollgate Community Junior School, Eastbourne 

Torfield School, Hastings 

Uplands Community College, Wadhurst 

Wallands Community Primary School, Lewes

 

 

Comments (66)

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10:17am Wed 9 Jul 14

Bluebeef says...

When thinking about this never forget who these unions sponsor: yes it's Ed the Marxist genes Milliband
When thinking about this never forget who these unions sponsor: yes it's Ed the Marxist genes Milliband Bluebeef
  • Score: -24

10:31am Wed 9 Jul 14

spa301 says...

Who will this harm other than the children's education?
Who will this harm other than the children's education? spa301
  • Score: -17

11:00am Wed 9 Jul 14

TROY44 says...

Its time too put teachers on a 12 month contract. Sack them if they strike.
Sack them if they cant cope with the part time hours.

Its really time now the government took a firm hand. Bring back Thatcher.

All teachers would struggle too do a full time job.

I Would love too see them cope on a minimum wage.

A 12 MONTH CONTRACT Would sort them out.
Its time too put teachers on a 12 month contract. Sack them if they strike. Sack them if they cant cope with the part time hours. Its really time now the government took a firm hand. Bring back Thatcher. All teachers would struggle too do a full time job. I Would love too see them cope on a minimum wage. A 12 MONTH CONTRACT Would sort them out. TROY44
  • Score: -43

11:06am Wed 9 Jul 14

matlock says...

What hypocrisy. Taking kids on holiday harms their education, but it's ok for schools to close for strike action, apparently?
What hypocrisy. Taking kids on holiday harms their education, but it's ok for schools to close for strike action, apparently? matlock
  • Score: 24

11:09am Wed 9 Jul 14

cookie_brighton says...

now will these teachers who close schools be fined as we, the parents are, if we take our children out of school for 1 day or more....
now will these teachers who close schools be fined as we, the parents are, if we take our children out of school for 1 day or more.... cookie_brighton
  • Score: 19

11:11am Wed 9 Jul 14

richardpowell40 says...

If we take out our kids in term time we get fined, but when the teachers take strike action we have to accept it ! We,the parents then have to take time off or find care for our children. What with all the inset days and school holidays they must get about 5 months off a year !!!
If we take out our kids in term time we get fined, but when the teachers take strike action we have to accept it ! We,the parents then have to take time off or find care for our children. What with all the inset days and school holidays they must get about 5 months off a year !!! richardpowell40
  • Score: 15

12:01pm Wed 9 Jul 14

wexler53 says...

Striking is the last resort of the mentally challenged...

These people don't know when they are well off. The reality is that they are still far from catching up with real life. With a few exceptions, none of them would cut it in the private sector.

And it's the private sector that provides the tax revenues to pay for their superb job conditions. It's a long time since we've seen any pay rises, certainly no job security for sure.

And before anyone goes on about public workers paying tax too, well they might but it's only recycling private tax revenues. No new money from them.

But in a politically correct work environment where turning up is enough, they're alright, nice and secure with good pensions to look forward to. Striking really is an easy option.
Striking is the last resort of the mentally challenged... These people don't know when they are well off. The reality is that they are still far from catching up with real life. With a few exceptions, none of them would cut it in the private sector. And it's the private sector that provides the tax revenues to pay for their superb job conditions. It's a long time since we've seen any pay rises, certainly no job security for sure. And before anyone goes on about public workers paying tax too, well they might but it's only recycling private tax revenues. No new money from them. But in a politically correct work environment where turning up is enough, they're alright, nice and secure with good pensions to look forward to. Striking really is an easy option. wexler53
  • Score: -27

12:13pm Wed 9 Jul 14

her professional says...

Bluebeef wrote:
When thinking about this never forget who these unions sponsor: yes it's Ed the Marxist genes Milliband
These unions are all that's left to protect peoples' working conditions. Remember who is backing the Tories, shady tax avoiding "businessmen" lobbying for their own interests. at least the Unions represent the people who voted for them, Tory backers represent only themselves.
As for the "Marxist Genes" tag, absolutely pathetic.
[quote][p][bold]Bluebeef[/bold] wrote: When thinking about this never forget who these unions sponsor: yes it's Ed the Marxist genes Milliband[/p][/quote]These unions are all that's left to protect peoples' working conditions. Remember who is backing the Tories, shady tax avoiding "businessmen" lobbying for their own interests. at least the Unions represent the people who voted for them, Tory backers represent only themselves. As for the "Marxist Genes" tag, absolutely pathetic. her professional
  • Score: 22

12:16pm Wed 9 Jul 14

s&k says...

TROY44 wrote:
Its time too put teachers on a 12 month contract. Sack them if they strike. Sack them if they cant cope with the part time hours. Its really time now the government took a firm hand. Bring back Thatcher. All teachers would struggle too do a full time job. I Would love too see them cope on a minimum wage. A 12 MONTH CONTRACT Would sort them out.
You really want to bring back a PM that decimated our national industries and manufacturing base?
[quote][p][bold]TROY44[/bold] wrote: Its time too put teachers on a 12 month contract. Sack them if they strike. Sack them if they cant cope with the part time hours. Its really time now the government took a firm hand. Bring back Thatcher. All teachers would struggle too do a full time job. I Would love too see them cope on a minimum wage. A 12 MONTH CONTRACT Would sort them out.[/p][/quote]You really want to bring back a PM that decimated our national industries and manufacturing base? s&k
  • Score: 27

12:19pm Wed 9 Jul 14

Fight_Back says...

matlock wrote:
What hypocrisy. Taking kids on holiday harms their education, but it's ok for schools to close for strike action, apparently?
Agreed. Let's add to that hypocrisy - a certain senior school in Hove currently has a number of pupils on a trip to France. Not all pupils could go as places were limited. The rest still have to go to school each day ( tomorrow excepted ! ). So how come those students that have been allowed on the trip aren't losing out on their education but when a parent does exactly the same they are ? Obviously the cynic in me suggests that teachers would miss their free foreign holiday paid for by parents so all of sudden there is justification for the trip.
[quote][p][bold]matlock[/bold] wrote: What hypocrisy. Taking kids on holiday harms their education, but it's ok for schools to close for strike action, apparently?[/p][/quote]Agreed. Let's add to that hypocrisy - a certain senior school in Hove currently has a number of pupils on a trip to France. Not all pupils could go as places were limited. The rest still have to go to school each day ( tomorrow excepted ! ). So how come those students that have been allowed on the trip aren't losing out on their education but when a parent does exactly the same they are ? Obviously the cynic in me suggests that teachers would miss their free foreign holiday paid for by parents so all of sudden there is justification for the trip. Fight_Back
  • Score: -9

12:25pm Wed 9 Jul 14

Bluebeef says...

her professional wrote:
Bluebeef wrote:
When thinking about this never forget who these unions sponsor: yes it's Ed the Marxist genes Milliband
These unions are all that's left to protect peoples' working conditions. Remember who is backing the Tories, shady tax avoiding "businessmen" lobbying for their own interests. at least the Unions represent the people who voted for them, Tory backers represent only themselves.
As for the "Marxist Genes" tag, absolutely pathetic.
Correction: the unions are there to protect their MEMBERS ( and officers)working conditions and to hell with the rest of the populace. I feel rather more sorry for the single mother who has to work to make ends meet and who will have to get childcare for the day of this unnecessary strike than for most teachers who despite the fuss they make do not exactly have a highly stressful or risky life.
[quote][p][bold]her professional[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Bluebeef[/bold] wrote: When thinking about this never forget who these unions sponsor: yes it's Ed the Marxist genes Milliband[/p][/quote]These unions are all that's left to protect peoples' working conditions. Remember who is backing the Tories, shady tax avoiding "businessmen" lobbying for their own interests. at least the Unions represent the people who voted for them, Tory backers represent only themselves. As for the "Marxist Genes" tag, absolutely pathetic.[/p][/quote]Correction: the unions are there to protect their MEMBERS ( and officers)working conditions and to hell with the rest of the populace. I feel rather more sorry for the single mother who has to work to make ends meet and who will have to get childcare for the day of this unnecessary strike than for most teachers who despite the fuss they make do not exactly have a highly stressful or risky life. Bluebeef
  • Score: -13

12:25pm Wed 9 Jul 14

stevo!! says...

Fight_Back wrote:
matlock wrote:
What hypocrisy. Taking kids on holiday harms their education, but it's ok for schools to close for strike action, apparently?
Agreed. Let's add to that hypocrisy - a certain senior school in Hove currently has a number of pupils on a trip to France. Not all pupils could go as places were limited. The rest still have to go to school each day ( tomorrow excepted ! ). So how come those students that have been allowed on the trip aren't losing out on their education but when a parent does exactly the same they are ? Obviously the cynic in me suggests that teachers would miss their free foreign holiday paid for by parents so all of sudden there is justification for the trip.
It was an educational trip, so technically the kids were still being educated.
[quote][p][bold]Fight_Back[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]matlock[/bold] wrote: What hypocrisy. Taking kids on holiday harms their education, but it's ok for schools to close for strike action, apparently?[/p][/quote]Agreed. Let's add to that hypocrisy - a certain senior school in Hove currently has a number of pupils on a trip to France. Not all pupils could go as places were limited. The rest still have to go to school each day ( tomorrow excepted ! ). So how come those students that have been allowed on the trip aren't losing out on their education but when a parent does exactly the same they are ? Obviously the cynic in me suggests that teachers would miss their free foreign holiday paid for by parents so all of sudden there is justification for the trip.[/p][/quote]It was an educational trip, so technically the kids were still being educated. stevo!!
  • Score: 11

12:28pm Wed 9 Jul 14

Bluebeef says...

her professional wrote:
Bluebeef wrote:
When thinking about this never forget who these unions sponsor: yes it's Ed the Marxist genes Milliband
These unions are all that's left to protect peoples' working conditions. Remember who is backing the Tories, shady tax avoiding "businessmen" lobbying for their own interests. at least the Unions represent the people who voted for them, Tory backers represent only themselves.
As for the "Marxist Genes" tag, absolutely pathetic.
Were you alive in the 70s: this country was nearly brought to its knees by the activities of politically motivated, Communist, Trotskyist, Marxist dominated unions who amongst other little gems forced a three-day week.
Pathetic: Do you actually listen to Miliband's messages he wants to take as much further to the left.
[quote][p][bold]her professional[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Bluebeef[/bold] wrote: When thinking about this never forget who these unions sponsor: yes it's Ed the Marxist genes Milliband[/p][/quote]These unions are all that's left to protect peoples' working conditions. Remember who is backing the Tories, shady tax avoiding "businessmen" lobbying for their own interests. at least the Unions represent the people who voted for them, Tory backers represent only themselves. As for the "Marxist Genes" tag, absolutely pathetic.[/p][/quote]Were you alive in the 70s: this country was nearly brought to its knees by the activities of politically motivated, Communist, Trotskyist, Marxist dominated unions who amongst other little gems forced a three-day week. Pathetic: Do you actually listen to Miliband's messages he wants to take as much further to the left. Bluebeef
  • Score: -9

12:52pm Wed 9 Jul 14

Fight_Back says...

stevo!! wrote:
Fight_Back wrote:
matlock wrote:
What hypocrisy. Taking kids on holiday harms their education, but it's ok for schools to close for strike action, apparently?
Agreed. Let's add to that hypocrisy - a certain senior school in Hove currently has a number of pupils on a trip to France. Not all pupils could go as places were limited. The rest still have to go to school each day ( tomorrow excepted ! ). So how come those students that have been allowed on the trip aren't losing out on their education but when a parent does exactly the same they are ? Obviously the cynic in me suggests that teachers would miss their free foreign holiday paid for by parents so all of sudden there is justification for the trip.
It was an educational trip, so technically the kids were still being educated.
That may well be the case but it overlooks to key things :

1. A family holiday really can be educational

2. Have a guess what the pupils left behind have been doing in lessons ? Watching movies !!!!!
[quote][p][bold]stevo!![/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Fight_Back[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]matlock[/bold] wrote: What hypocrisy. Taking kids on holiday harms their education, but it's ok for schools to close for strike action, apparently?[/p][/quote]Agreed. Let's add to that hypocrisy - a certain senior school in Hove currently has a number of pupils on a trip to France. Not all pupils could go as places were limited. The rest still have to go to school each day ( tomorrow excepted ! ). So how come those students that have been allowed on the trip aren't losing out on their education but when a parent does exactly the same they are ? Obviously the cynic in me suggests that teachers would miss their free foreign holiday paid for by parents so all of sudden there is justification for the trip.[/p][/quote]It was an educational trip, so technically the kids were still being educated.[/p][/quote]That may well be the case but it overlooks to key things : 1. A family holiday really can be educational 2. Have a guess what the pupils left behind have been doing in lessons ? Watching movies !!!!! Fight_Back
  • Score: 8

12:56pm Wed 9 Jul 14

stevo!! says...

Bluebeef wrote:
her professional wrote:
Bluebeef wrote:
When thinking about this never forget who these unions sponsor: yes it's Ed the Marxist genes Milliband
These unions are all that's left to protect peoples' working conditions. Remember who is backing the Tories, shady tax avoiding "businessmen" lobbying for their own interests. at least the Unions represent the people who voted for them, Tory backers represent only themselves.
As for the "Marxist Genes" tag, absolutely pathetic.
Were you alive in the 70s: this country was nearly brought to its knees by the activities of politically motivated, Communist, Trotskyist, Marxist dominated unions who amongst other little gems forced a three-day week.
Pathetic: Do you actually listen to Miliband's messages he wants to take as much further to the left.
And were the movies the '2 Fast 2 Furious' series?

Family holidays, educational or not, are not allowed in term-time. The trips in question aren't holidays.
[quote][p][bold]Bluebeef[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]her professional[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Bluebeef[/bold] wrote: When thinking about this never forget who these unions sponsor: yes it's Ed the Marxist genes Milliband[/p][/quote]These unions are all that's left to protect peoples' working conditions. Remember who is backing the Tories, shady tax avoiding "businessmen" lobbying for their own interests. at least the Unions represent the people who voted for them, Tory backers represent only themselves. As for the "Marxist Genes" tag, absolutely pathetic.[/p][/quote]Were you alive in the 70s: this country was nearly brought to its knees by the activities of politically motivated, Communist, Trotskyist, Marxist dominated unions who amongst other little gems forced a three-day week. Pathetic: Do you actually listen to Miliband's messages he wants to take as much further to the left.[/p][/quote]And were the movies the '2 Fast 2 Furious' series? Family holidays, educational or not, are not allowed in term-time. The trips in question aren't holidays. stevo!!
  • Score: -9

12:58pm Wed 9 Jul 14

fredaj says...

Fight_Back wrote:
stevo!! wrote:
Fight_Back wrote:
matlock wrote:
What hypocrisy. Taking kids on holiday harms their education, but it's ok for schools to close for strike action, apparently?
Agreed. Let's add to that hypocrisy - a certain senior school in Hove currently has a number of pupils on a trip to France. Not all pupils could go as places were limited. The rest still have to go to school each day ( tomorrow excepted ! ). So how come those students that have been allowed on the trip aren't losing out on their education but when a parent does exactly the same they are ? Obviously the cynic in me suggests that teachers would miss their free foreign holiday paid for by parents so all of sudden there is justification for the trip.
It was an educational trip, so technically the kids were still being educated.
That may well be the case but it overlooks to key things :

1. A family holiday really can be educational

2. Have a guess what the pupils left behind have been doing in lessons ? Watching movies !!!!!
Taking kids out of school so Mum and Dad get a cheap holiday lounging by the pool is NOT educational and will never be educational.

And any suggestion that taking kids out of school for holidays is anything other than to save cash is not telling the truth.
[quote][p][bold]Fight_Back[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]stevo!![/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Fight_Back[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]matlock[/bold] wrote: What hypocrisy. Taking kids on holiday harms their education, but it's ok for schools to close for strike action, apparently?[/p][/quote]Agreed. Let's add to that hypocrisy - a certain senior school in Hove currently has a number of pupils on a trip to France. Not all pupils could go as places were limited. The rest still have to go to school each day ( tomorrow excepted ! ). So how come those students that have been allowed on the trip aren't losing out on their education but when a parent does exactly the same they are ? Obviously the cynic in me suggests that teachers would miss their free foreign holiday paid for by parents so all of sudden there is justification for the trip.[/p][/quote]It was an educational trip, so technically the kids were still being educated.[/p][/quote]That may well be the case but it overlooks to key things : 1. A family holiday really can be educational 2. Have a guess what the pupils left behind have been doing in lessons ? Watching movies !!!!![/p][/quote]Taking kids out of school so Mum and Dad get a cheap holiday lounging by the pool is NOT educational and will never be educational. And any suggestion that taking kids out of school for holidays is anything other than to save cash is not telling the truth. fredaj
  • Score: 10

1:07pm Wed 9 Jul 14

IsaJ says...

Fight_Back wrote:
stevo!! wrote:
Fight_Back wrote:
matlock wrote:
What hypocrisy. Taking kids on holiday harms their education, but it's ok for schools to close for strike action, apparently?
Agreed. Let's add to that hypocrisy - a certain senior school in Hove currently has a number of pupils on a trip to France. Not all pupils could go as places were limited. The rest still have to go to school each day ( tomorrow excepted ! ). So how come those students that have been allowed on the trip aren't losing out on their education but when a parent does exactly the same they are ? Obviously the cynic in me suggests that teachers would miss their free foreign holiday paid for by parents so all of sudden there is justification for the trip.
It was an educational trip, so technically the kids were still being educated.
That may well be the case but it overlooks to key things :

1. A family holiday really can be educational

2. Have a guess what the pupils left behind have been doing in lessons ? Watching movies !!!!!
My daughter is in the same year and in the same school you're talking about, Fight_Back, and I can assure you they're not watching movies. This time of year is always dedicated to non-academic time, with KS3 in activity week (or school trip) and year 10 in work experience.
The kids who are not on the school trip get to talk about other topics than school subjects, their place in society, the roles of charities, the place of fashion, etc. After all, schooling is more than learning maths and English.

In my experience from my own schooldays in France, the British system is much more rounded, encompassing a pastoral care which doesn't exist in French education. Good or bad, I can't tell, but I know my daughter is quite disappointed she has to miss one day of Activity Week because of the strike!
[quote][p][bold]Fight_Back[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]stevo!![/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Fight_Back[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]matlock[/bold] wrote: What hypocrisy. Taking kids on holiday harms their education, but it's ok for schools to close for strike action, apparently?[/p][/quote]Agreed. Let's add to that hypocrisy - a certain senior school in Hove currently has a number of pupils on a trip to France. Not all pupils could go as places were limited. The rest still have to go to school each day ( tomorrow excepted ! ). So how come those students that have been allowed on the trip aren't losing out on their education but when a parent does exactly the same they are ? Obviously the cynic in me suggests that teachers would miss their free foreign holiday paid for by parents so all of sudden there is justification for the trip.[/p][/quote]It was an educational trip, so technically the kids were still being educated.[/p][/quote]That may well be the case but it overlooks to key things : 1. A family holiday really can be educational 2. Have a guess what the pupils left behind have been doing in lessons ? Watching movies !!!!![/p][/quote]My daughter is in the same year and in the same school you're talking about, Fight_Back, and I can assure you they're not watching movies. This time of year is always dedicated to non-academic time, with KS3 in activity week (or school trip) and year 10 in work experience. The kids who are not on the school trip get to talk about other topics than school subjects, their place in society, the roles of charities, the place of fashion, etc. After all, schooling is more than learning maths and English. In my experience from my own schooldays in France, the British system is much more rounded, encompassing a pastoral care which doesn't exist in French education. Good or bad, I can't tell, but I know my daughter is quite disappointed she has to miss one day of Activity Week because of the strike! IsaJ
  • Score: 11

1:12pm Wed 9 Jul 14

Fight_Back says...

IsaJ wrote:
Fight_Back wrote:
stevo!! wrote:
Fight_Back wrote:
matlock wrote:
What hypocrisy. Taking kids on holiday harms their education, but it's ok for schools to close for strike action, apparently?
Agreed. Let's add to that hypocrisy - a certain senior school in Hove currently has a number of pupils on a trip to France. Not all pupils could go as places were limited. The rest still have to go to school each day ( tomorrow excepted ! ). So how come those students that have been allowed on the trip aren't losing out on their education but when a parent does exactly the same they are ? Obviously the cynic in me suggests that teachers would miss their free foreign holiday paid for by parents so all of sudden there is justification for the trip.
It was an educational trip, so technically the kids were still being educated.
That may well be the case but it overlooks to key things :

1. A family holiday really can be educational

2. Have a guess what the pupils left behind have been doing in lessons ? Watching movies !!!!!
My daughter is in the same year and in the same school you're talking about, Fight_Back, and I can assure you they're not watching movies. This time of year is always dedicated to non-academic time, with KS3 in activity week (or school trip) and year 10 in work experience.
The kids who are not on the school trip get to talk about other topics than school subjects, their place in society, the roles of charities, the place of fashion, etc. After all, schooling is more than learning maths and English.

In my experience from my own schooldays in France, the British system is much more rounded, encompassing a pastoral care which doesn't exist in French education. Good or bad, I can't tell, but I know my daughter is quite disappointed she has to miss one day of Activity Week because of the strike!
Possibly different years then because I can assure you my daughter spent most of yesterday watching movies in various lessons.
[quote][p][bold]IsaJ[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Fight_Back[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]stevo!![/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Fight_Back[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]matlock[/bold] wrote: What hypocrisy. Taking kids on holiday harms their education, but it's ok for schools to close for strike action, apparently?[/p][/quote]Agreed. Let's add to that hypocrisy - a certain senior school in Hove currently has a number of pupils on a trip to France. Not all pupils could go as places were limited. The rest still have to go to school each day ( tomorrow excepted ! ). So how come those students that have been allowed on the trip aren't losing out on their education but when a parent does exactly the same they are ? Obviously the cynic in me suggests that teachers would miss their free foreign holiday paid for by parents so all of sudden there is justification for the trip.[/p][/quote]It was an educational trip, so technically the kids were still being educated.[/p][/quote]That may well be the case but it overlooks to key things : 1. A family holiday really can be educational 2. Have a guess what the pupils left behind have been doing in lessons ? Watching movies !!!!![/p][/quote]My daughter is in the same year and in the same school you're talking about, Fight_Back, and I can assure you they're not watching movies. This time of year is always dedicated to non-academic time, with KS3 in activity week (or school trip) and year 10 in work experience. The kids who are not on the school trip get to talk about other topics than school subjects, their place in society, the roles of charities, the place of fashion, etc. After all, schooling is more than learning maths and English. In my experience from my own schooldays in France, the British system is much more rounded, encompassing a pastoral care which doesn't exist in French education. Good or bad, I can't tell, but I know my daughter is quite disappointed she has to miss one day of Activity Week because of the strike![/p][/quote]Possibly different years then because I can assure you my daughter spent most of yesterday watching movies in various lessons. Fight_Back
  • Score: -10

1:19pm Wed 9 Jul 14

Number Six says...

Oh goody. I can have a few more minutes in bed so I won't have to contend with the school run
Oh goody. I can have a few more minutes in bed so I won't have to contend with the school run Number Six
  • Score: 23

1:33pm Wed 9 Jul 14

her professional says...

Bluebeef wrote:
her professional wrote:
Bluebeef wrote:
When thinking about this never forget who these unions sponsor: yes it's Ed the Marxist genes Milliband
These unions are all that's left to protect peoples' working conditions. Remember who is backing the Tories, shady tax avoiding "businessmen" lobbying for their own interests. at least the Unions represent the people who voted for them, Tory backers represent only themselves.
As for the "Marxist Genes" tag, absolutely pathetic.
Were you alive in the 70s: this country was nearly brought to its knees by the activities of politically motivated, Communist, Trotskyist, Marxist dominated unions who amongst other little gems forced a three-day week.
Pathetic: Do you actually listen to Miliband's messages he wants to take as much further to the left.
Yes I was alive and employed during the 70s. Just because the unions were arguably too powerful then doesn't make them inherently bad, the pendulum has swung back too far the other way. And whilst parroting the "red Ed backed by the Unions" mantra, you fail to address my point regarding the shady backers of the Tories ( and UKIP for that matter). Of course he'll take us to the left, he leads the Labour Party, get the idea. That way you have a choice of people on the political spectrum to vote for, and a significant proportion of voters would like something a bit more radical, just how many will be revealed at the election.
The only way to avoid patronage of political parties and the subsequent influence of their backers would be to have all parties funded from taxation, probably not a popular idea in the current climate!
[quote][p][bold]Bluebeef[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]her professional[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Bluebeef[/bold] wrote: When thinking about this never forget who these unions sponsor: yes it's Ed the Marxist genes Milliband[/p][/quote]These unions are all that's left to protect peoples' working conditions. Remember who is backing the Tories, shady tax avoiding "businessmen" lobbying for their own interests. at least the Unions represent the people who voted for them, Tory backers represent only themselves. As for the "Marxist Genes" tag, absolutely pathetic.[/p][/quote]Were you alive in the 70s: this country was nearly brought to its knees by the activities of politically motivated, Communist, Trotskyist, Marxist dominated unions who amongst other little gems forced a three-day week. Pathetic: Do you actually listen to Miliband's messages he wants to take as much further to the left.[/p][/quote]Yes I was alive and employed during the 70s. Just because the unions were arguably too powerful then doesn't make them inherently bad, the pendulum has swung back too far the other way. And whilst parroting the "red Ed backed by the Unions" mantra, you fail to address my point regarding the shady backers of the Tories ( and UKIP for that matter). Of course he'll take us to the left, he leads the Labour Party, get the idea. That way you have a choice of people on the political spectrum to vote for, and a significant proportion of voters would like something a bit more radical, just how many will be revealed at the election. The only way to avoid patronage of political parties and the subsequent influence of their backers would be to have all parties funded from taxation, probably not a popular idea in the current climate! her professional
  • Score: 4

1:39pm Wed 9 Jul 14

scottishb;ue says...

her professional wrote:
Bluebeef wrote:
When thinking about this never forget who these unions sponsor: yes it's Ed the Marxist genes Milliband
These unions are all that's left to protect peoples' working conditions. Remember who is backing the Tories, shady tax avoiding "businessmen" lobbying for their own interests. at least the Unions represent the people who voted for them, Tory backers represent only themselves.
As for the "Marxist Genes" tag, absolutely pathetic.
Then why are these union bosses getting massive pay increases plus all the percs they get ,I was once in a union only to see that the people at the top got what they wanted whilst we lost out on a days wage for striking and in the end nothing improved apart from their wages
[quote][p][bold]her professional[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Bluebeef[/bold] wrote: When thinking about this never forget who these unions sponsor: yes it's Ed the Marxist genes Milliband[/p][/quote]These unions are all that's left to protect peoples' working conditions. Remember who is backing the Tories, shady tax avoiding "businessmen" lobbying for their own interests. at least the Unions represent the people who voted for them, Tory backers represent only themselves. As for the "Marxist Genes" tag, absolutely pathetic.[/p][/quote]Then why are these union bosses getting massive pay increases plus all the percs they get ,I was once in a union only to see that the people at the top got what they wanted whilst we lost out on a days wage for striking and in the end nothing improved apart from their wages scottishb;ue
  • Score: -5

1:40pm Wed 9 Jul 14

PenPushingPauper says...

Predictably bigoted, ignorant comments from the Argus readers... You only have to watch the news or look out the window once in a while to know that teachers are being squeezed to the point of ridiculousness.

Striking is a last resort... It doesn't benefit anyone but it serves to open the ears of those at the top who have thus far refused to listen. We should be supporting the teachers.

And if you have a problem with it... Maybe take it up with the people ACTUALLY causing the problem instead of making vile comments on a local news site.
Predictably bigoted, ignorant comments from the Argus readers... You only have to watch the news or look out the window once in a while to know that teachers are being squeezed to the point of ridiculousness. Striking is a last resort... It doesn't benefit anyone but it serves to open the ears of those at the top who have thus far refused to listen. We should be supporting the teachers. And if you have a problem with it... Maybe take it up with the people ACTUALLY causing the problem instead of making vile comments on a local news site. PenPushingPauper
  • Score: 27

3:06pm Wed 9 Jul 14

TROY44 says...

Watch out all the part time half witted flip flopped waste of space teachers will be marching in the streets of Brighton.

What would a teacher do if faced with a real working week?

You should be ashamed of yourselfs.
Watch out all the part time half witted flip flopped waste of space teachers will be marching in the streets of Brighton. What would a teacher do if faced with a real working week? You should be ashamed of yourselfs. TROY44
  • Score: -24

3:08pm Wed 9 Jul 14

the red head says...

I do not take my child out of school during term time for holidays. To all those commenters who think it's justifiable because of teachers taking one day to try to protect the education of all our children... Ours, not theirs... I say, do what you want. Take them on holiday, it's only your child that will suffer. Meanwhile I will support those in the education system and ensure my child gets the best chance possible by supporting her and encouraging her studies...

It's such an idiotic response to compare your own selfishness to across the board action. We adults are not supposed to be in some kind of playground of but miss, he did this so why can't i do that? . Get real.
I do not take my child out of school during term time for holidays. To all those commenters who think it's justifiable because of teachers taking one day to try to protect the education of all our children... Ours, not theirs... I say, do what you want. Take them on holiday, it's only your child that will suffer. Meanwhile I will support those in the education system and ensure my child gets the best chance possible by supporting her and encouraging her studies... It's such an idiotic response to compare your own selfishness to across the board action. We adults are not supposed to be in some kind of playground of but miss, he did this so why can't i do that? . Get real. the red head
  • Score: 12

3:09pm Wed 9 Jul 14

TROY44 says...

PenPushingPauper wrote:
Predictably bigoted, ignorant comments from the Argus readers... You only have to watch the news or look out the window once in a while to know that teachers are being squeezed to the point of ridiculousness.

Striking is a last resort... It doesn't benefit anyone but it serves to open the ears of those at the top who have thus far refused to listen. We should be supporting the teachers.

And if you have a problem with it... Maybe take it up with the people ACTUALLY causing the problem instead of making vile comments on a local news site.
No one would care if you striked every week.
Its getting Oh so .............yawn Boring
[quote][p][bold]PenPushingPauper[/bold] wrote: Predictably bigoted, ignorant comments from the Argus readers... You only have to watch the news or look out the window once in a while to know that teachers are being squeezed to the point of ridiculousness. Striking is a last resort... It doesn't benefit anyone but it serves to open the ears of those at the top who have thus far refused to listen. We should be supporting the teachers. And if you have a problem with it... Maybe take it up with the people ACTUALLY causing the problem instead of making vile comments on a local news site.[/p][/quote]No one would care if you striked every week. Its getting Oh so .............yawn Boring TROY44
  • Score: -21

3:53pm Wed 9 Jul 14

Jules boy says...

matlock wrote:
What hypocrisy. Taking kids on holiday harms their education, but it's ok for schools to close for strike action, apparently?
Too right, one rule for one, one rule for another
[quote][p][bold]matlock[/bold] wrote: What hypocrisy. Taking kids on holiday harms their education, but it's ok for schools to close for strike action, apparently?[/p][/quote]Too right, one rule for one, one rule for another Jules boy
  • Score: -16

3:55pm Wed 9 Jul 14

Jules boy says...

cookie_brighton wrote:
now will these teachers who close schools be fined as we, the parents are, if we take our children out of school for 1 day or more....
teachers showing no respect for their jobs in tough economic times
[quote][p][bold]cookie_brighton[/bold] wrote: now will these teachers who close schools be fined as we, the parents are, if we take our children out of school for 1 day or more....[/p][/quote]teachers showing no respect for their jobs in tough economic times Jules boy
  • Score: -20

3:58pm Wed 9 Jul 14

Jules boy says...

TROY44 wrote:
Watch out all the part time half witted flip flopped waste of space teachers will be marching in the streets of Brighton.

What would a teacher do if faced with a real working week?

You should be ashamed of yourselfs.
Well said, total disgrace - get with the REAL world teachers.
[quote][p][bold]TROY44[/bold] wrote: Watch out all the part time half witted flip flopped waste of space teachers will be marching in the streets of Brighton. What would a teacher do if faced with a real working week? You should be ashamed of yourselfs.[/p][/quote]Well said, total disgrace - get with the REAL world teachers. Jules boy
  • Score: -16

4:10pm Wed 9 Jul 14

Jules boy says...

Such a tough job, weekends off, don't work nights, bank holidays off, every Christmas and Easter off, long break in Summer etc etc etc - people out there working all kinda shifts just to make ends meet would be grateful for just some of these benefits, oh hold on I've got tomorrow off, why? because I have to be at home to cover childcare when I should be earning rather than letting my place of work down - yes I do take pride in my employment and respect my job which is more than could be said for the teachers - just about to have 6 weeks off ain't u? - hang your heads in shame.
Such a tough job, weekends off, don't work nights, bank holidays off, every Christmas and Easter off, long break in Summer etc etc etc - people out there working all kinda shifts just to make ends meet would be grateful for just some of these benefits, oh hold on I've got tomorrow off, why? because I have to be at home to cover childcare when I should be earning rather than letting my place of work down - yes I do take pride in my employment and respect my job which is more than could be said for the teachers - just about to have 6 weeks off ain't u? - hang your heads in shame. Jules boy
  • Score: -19

4:27pm Wed 9 Jul 14

MileOaker2014 says...

Jules boy wrote:
Such a tough job, weekends off, don't work nights, bank holidays off, every Christmas and Easter off, long break in Summer etc etc etc - people out there working all kinda shifts just to make ends meet would be grateful for just some of these benefits, oh hold on I've got tomorrow off, why? because I have to be at home to cover childcare when I should be earning rather than letting my place of work down - yes I do take pride in my employment and respect my job which is more than could be said for the teachers - just about to have 6 weeks off ain't u? - hang your heads in shame.
Top post there, sums it up totally. Teachers are a waste of. My eldest has been bullied for over a year and the bully gets special treatment because they have "anger issues" and my child gets left to fend for herself WTF. The world of teaching has gone to pot. My bill for my day off with be with the headteacher on Friday morning.
No respect to any teachers anymore - everyone is in the same boat, it's a struggle, it's life. Get on with it like we have to.
[quote][p][bold]Jules boy[/bold] wrote: Such a tough job, weekends off, don't work nights, bank holidays off, every Christmas and Easter off, long break in Summer etc etc etc - people out there working all kinda shifts just to make ends meet would be grateful for just some of these benefits, oh hold on I've got tomorrow off, why? because I have to be at home to cover childcare when I should be earning rather than letting my place of work down - yes I do take pride in my employment and respect my job which is more than could be said for the teachers - just about to have 6 weeks off ain't u? - hang your heads in shame.[/p][/quote]Top post there, sums it up totally. Teachers are a waste of. My eldest has been bullied for over a year and the bully gets special treatment because they have "anger issues" and my child gets left to fend for herself WTF. The world of teaching has gone to pot. My bill for my day off with be with the headteacher on Friday morning. No respect to any teachers anymore - everyone is in the same boat, it's a struggle, it's life. Get on with it like we have to. MileOaker2014
  • Score: -5

5:09pm Wed 9 Jul 14

her professional says...

TROY44 wrote:
PenPushingPauper wrote:
Predictably bigoted, ignorant comments from the Argus readers... You only have to watch the news or look out the window once in a while to know that teachers are being squeezed to the point of ridiculousness.

Striking is a last resort... It doesn't benefit anyone but it serves to open the ears of those at the top who have thus far refused to listen. We should be supporting the teachers.

And if you have a problem with it... Maybe take it up with the people ACTUALLY causing the problem instead of making vile comments on a local news site.
No one would care if you striked every week.
Its getting Oh so .............yawn Boring
Killer argument from Troy. Bet you were a joy to teach.
[quote][p][bold]TROY44[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]PenPushingPauper[/bold] wrote: Predictably bigoted, ignorant comments from the Argus readers... You only have to watch the news or look out the window once in a while to know that teachers are being squeezed to the point of ridiculousness. Striking is a last resort... It doesn't benefit anyone but it serves to open the ears of those at the top who have thus far refused to listen. We should be supporting the teachers. And if you have a problem with it... Maybe take it up with the people ACTUALLY causing the problem instead of making vile comments on a local news site.[/p][/quote]No one would care if you striked every week. Its getting Oh so .............yawn Boring[/p][/quote]Killer argument from Troy. Bet you were a joy to teach. her professional
  • Score: 16

5:12pm Wed 9 Jul 14

her professional says...

Jules boy wrote:
cookie_brighton wrote:
now will these teachers who close schools be fined as we, the parents are, if we take our children out of school for 1 day or more....
teachers showing no respect for their jobs in tough economic times
Unlike the saintly bankers and the rest of the financial sector presumably.
[quote][p][bold]Jules boy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]cookie_brighton[/bold] wrote: now will these teachers who close schools be fined as we, the parents are, if we take our children out of school for 1 day or more....[/p][/quote]teachers showing no respect for their jobs in tough economic times[/p][/quote]Unlike the saintly bankers and the rest of the financial sector presumably. her professional
  • Score: 17

6:14pm Wed 9 Jul 14

TROY44 says...

her professional wrote:
TROY44 wrote:
PenPushingPauper wrote:
Predictably bigoted, ignorant comments from the Argus readers... You only have to watch the news or look out the window once in a while to know that teachers are being squeezed to the point of ridiculousness.

Striking is a last resort... It doesn't benefit anyone but it serves to open the ears of those at the top who have thus far refused to listen. We should be supporting the teachers.

And if you have a problem with it... Maybe take it up with the people ACTUALLY causing the problem instead of making vile comments on a local news site.
No one would care if you striked every week.
Its getting Oh so .............yawn Boring
Killer argument from Troy. Bet you were a joy to teach.
I Had respect for my teachers, they never went on strike. They were not softie days.
We went too shool when it snowed. The school never closed for snowflakes or insect days.

Teachers have it far too easy. Its now time to change lets get teachers in that can do the job.
Bring in 12 month contracts. Then weed out the trouble makers and the softies.
Keep schools open till 6pm and reduce the holidays to 4 weeks per year. Like the rest of the working class.
[quote][p][bold]her professional[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]TROY44[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]PenPushingPauper[/bold] wrote: Predictably bigoted, ignorant comments from the Argus readers... You only have to watch the news or look out the window once in a while to know that teachers are being squeezed to the point of ridiculousness. Striking is a last resort... It doesn't benefit anyone but it serves to open the ears of those at the top who have thus far refused to listen. We should be supporting the teachers. And if you have a problem with it... Maybe take it up with the people ACTUALLY causing the problem instead of making vile comments on a local news site.[/p][/quote]No one would care if you striked every week. Its getting Oh so .............yawn Boring[/p][/quote]Killer argument from Troy. Bet you were a joy to teach.[/p][/quote]I Had respect for my teachers, they never went on strike. They were not softie days. We went too shool when it snowed. The school never closed for snowflakes or insect days. Teachers have it far too easy. Its now time to change lets get teachers in that can do the job. Bring in 12 month contracts. Then weed out the trouble makers and the softies. Keep schools open till 6pm and reduce the holidays to 4 weeks per year. Like the rest of the working class. TROY44
  • Score: -27

6:14pm Wed 9 Jul 14

Bluebeef says...

her professional wrote:
Bluebeef wrote:
her professional wrote:
Bluebeef wrote:
When thinking about this never forget who these unions sponsor: yes it's Ed the Marxist genes Milliband
These unions are all that's left to protect peoples' working conditions. Remember who is backing the Tories, shady tax avoiding "businessmen" lobbying for their own interests. at least the Unions represent the people who voted for them, Tory backers represent only themselves.
As for the "Marxist Genes" tag, absolutely pathetic.
Were you alive in the 70s: this country was nearly brought to its knees by the activities of politically motivated, Communist, Trotskyist, Marxist dominated unions who amongst other little gems forced a three-day week.
Pathetic: Do you actually listen to Miliband's messages he wants to take as much further to the left.
Yes I was alive and employed during the 70s. Just because the unions were arguably too powerful then doesn't make them inherently bad, the pendulum has swung back too far the other way. And whilst parroting the "red Ed backed by the Unions" mantra, you fail to address my point regarding the shady backers of the Tories ( and UKIP for that matter). Of course he'll take us to the left, he leads the Labour Party, get the idea. That way you have a choice of people on the political spectrum to vote for, and a significant proportion of voters would like something a bit more radical, just how many will be revealed at the election.
The only way to avoid patronage of political parties and the subsequent influence of their backers would be to have all parties funded from taxation, probably not a popular idea in the current climate!
What a silly patronising response: the point I keep trying to make is that Ed wants to take us far to the left of our previous New Labour government but a distressing percentage of potential voters don't realise that. I really don't think I need to respond to your limp shady backers for Tories point every time I want to criticise Red Ed.
I also happen to have dealt with unions in a number of circumstances and at an individual support level consider them worthwhile and intelligent:it is when they start flexing their political muscles with nothing remotely approaching a majority of the members in favour of strike action that I am reminded of the grim days of the 70s.

As it happens I agree with you; removing patronage from political parties would be a tremendous idea and relative to the overall burden of taxation cost would be negligible
[quote][p][bold]her professional[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Bluebeef[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]her professional[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Bluebeef[/bold] wrote: When thinking about this never forget who these unions sponsor: yes it's Ed the Marxist genes Milliband[/p][/quote]These unions are all that's left to protect peoples' working conditions. Remember who is backing the Tories, shady tax avoiding "businessmen" lobbying for their own interests. at least the Unions represent the people who voted for them, Tory backers represent only themselves. As for the "Marxist Genes" tag, absolutely pathetic.[/p][/quote]Were you alive in the 70s: this country was nearly brought to its knees by the activities of politically motivated, Communist, Trotskyist, Marxist dominated unions who amongst other little gems forced a three-day week. Pathetic: Do you actually listen to Miliband's messages he wants to take as much further to the left.[/p][/quote]Yes I was alive and employed during the 70s. Just because the unions were arguably too powerful then doesn't make them inherently bad, the pendulum has swung back too far the other way. And whilst parroting the "red Ed backed by the Unions" mantra, you fail to address my point regarding the shady backers of the Tories ( and UKIP for that matter). Of course he'll take us to the left, he leads the Labour Party, get the idea. That way you have a choice of people on the political spectrum to vote for, and a significant proportion of voters would like something a bit more radical, just how many will be revealed at the election. The only way to avoid patronage of political parties and the subsequent influence of their backers would be to have all parties funded from taxation, probably not a popular idea in the current climate![/p][/quote]What a silly patronising response: the point I keep trying to make is that Ed wants to take us far to the left of our previous New Labour government but a distressing percentage of potential voters don't realise that. I really don't think I need to respond to your limp shady backers for Tories point every time I want to criticise Red Ed. I also happen to have dealt with unions in a number of circumstances and at an individual support level consider them worthwhile and intelligent:it is when they start flexing their political muscles with nothing remotely approaching a majority of the members in favour of strike action that I am reminded of the grim days of the 70s. As it happens I agree with you; removing patronage from political parties would be a tremendous idea and relative to the overall burden of taxation cost would be negligible Bluebeef
  • Score: -4

6:17pm Wed 9 Jul 14

TROY44 says...

MileOaker2014 wrote:
Jules boy wrote:
Such a tough job, weekends off, don't work nights, bank holidays off, every Christmas and Easter off, long break in Summer etc etc etc - people out there working all kinda shifts just to make ends meet would be grateful for just some of these benefits, oh hold on I've got tomorrow off, why? because I have to be at home to cover childcare when I should be earning rather than letting my place of work down - yes I do take pride in my employment and respect my job which is more than could be said for the teachers - just about to have 6 weeks off ain't u? - hang your heads in shame.
Top post there, sums it up totally. Teachers are a waste of. My eldest has been bullied for over a year and the bully gets special treatment because they have "anger issues" and my child gets left to fend for herself WTF. The world of teaching has gone to pot. My bill for my day off with be with the headteacher on Friday morning.
No respect to any teachers anymore - everyone is in the same boat, it's a struggle, it's life. Get on with it like we have to.
Brillant totally says it all well said.
[quote][p][bold]MileOaker2014[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Jules boy[/bold] wrote: Such a tough job, weekends off, don't work nights, bank holidays off, every Christmas and Easter off, long break in Summer etc etc etc - people out there working all kinda shifts just to make ends meet would be grateful for just some of these benefits, oh hold on I've got tomorrow off, why? because I have to be at home to cover childcare when I should be earning rather than letting my place of work down - yes I do take pride in my employment and respect my job which is more than could be said for the teachers - just about to have 6 weeks off ain't u? - hang your heads in shame.[/p][/quote]Top post there, sums it up totally. Teachers are a waste of. My eldest has been bullied for over a year and the bully gets special treatment because they have "anger issues" and my child gets left to fend for herself WTF. The world of teaching has gone to pot. My bill for my day off with be with the headteacher on Friday morning. No respect to any teachers anymore - everyone is in the same boat, it's a struggle, it's life. Get on with it like we have to.[/p][/quote]Brillant totally says it all well said. TROY44
  • Score: -30

6:45pm Wed 9 Jul 14

Quiterie says...

TROY44 wrote:
Its time too put teachers on a 12 month contract. Sack them if they strike.
Sack them if they cant cope with the part time hours.

Its really time now the government took a firm hand. Bring back Thatcher.

All teachers would struggle too do a full time job.

I Would love too see them cope on a minimum wage.

A 12 MONTH CONTRACT Would sort them out.
I think you'll find Thatcher's dead.

She certainly shook things up when she was Prime Minster, but I think she'll be largely ineffective in her current state.
[quote][p][bold]TROY44[/bold] wrote: Its time too put teachers on a 12 month contract. Sack them if they strike. Sack them if they cant cope with the part time hours. Its really time now the government took a firm hand. Bring back Thatcher. All teachers would struggle too do a full time job. I Would love too see them cope on a minimum wage. A 12 MONTH CONTRACT Would sort them out.[/p][/quote]I think you'll find Thatcher's dead. She certainly shook things up when she was Prime Minster, but I think she'll be largely ineffective in her current state. Quiterie
  • Score: 23

7:00pm Wed 9 Jul 14

Quiterie says...

TROY44 wrote:
Watch out all the part time half witted flip flopped waste of space teachers will be marching in the streets of Brighton.

What would a teacher do if faced with a real working week?

You should be ashamed of yourselfs.
The Department for Education runs an annual survey which was recently published and suggests teachers work an average of a 60 hour week.

That's a "real working week" in anybody's book. Many have to deal with disruptive children who get very little educational support from their parents at home and who really struggle with numeracy and literacy.

By the way I think the word you were looking for was "yourselves" rather than "yourselfs".
[quote][p][bold]TROY44[/bold] wrote: Watch out all the part time half witted flip flopped waste of space teachers will be marching in the streets of Brighton. What would a teacher do if faced with a real working week? You should be ashamed of yourselfs.[/p][/quote]The Department for Education runs an annual survey which was recently published and suggests teachers work an average of a 60 hour week. That's a "real working week" in anybody's book. Many have to deal with disruptive children who get very little educational support from their parents at home and who really struggle with numeracy and literacy. By the way I think the word you were looking for was "yourselves" rather than "yourselfs". Quiterie
  • Score: 27

7:07pm Wed 9 Jul 14

Youlikemyjugs says...

Appalling. Greedy, disgusting animals.

Now decent , innocent HARD-WORKING parents have to take a day off work to look after their children so their teachers can swan about Brighton waving placards about pay and pensions.

Wish I could have 13 weeks paid holiday a year. I really think these striking teachers should be arrested.
Appalling. Greedy, disgusting animals. Now decent , innocent HARD-WORKING parents have to take a day off work to look after their children so their teachers can swan about Brighton waving placards about pay and pensions. Wish I could have 13 weeks paid holiday a year. I really think these striking teachers should be arrested. Youlikemyjugs
  • Score: -26

9:18pm Wed 9 Jul 14

Wageslavemum says...

Though I don't necessarily agree with the strike, most of you don't know what you are talking about. Teachers DO work to 6pm and well beyond, most days AND. Weekends. Week in week out. For frozen pay. Paperwork is monstrous-targets,tr
acking, lesson preparation, marking . There is NO paid overtime but increasing number of late meetings/weekend duties AND educational trips that run into the holidays. During these 'luxurious'holidays teachers are often marking exam papers for 100's ofif kids,or being required to go in to help with 're purposing' of classrooms or checking if resources and materials. Teachers have 100's of interactions and demands every day, with YOUR children ,each one requiring something particular that needs to be followed through. Teachers teach class after class often not able to take a loo break and during 'breaks' are still on duty supervising kids in the playground for example. Teaching is physically demanding -carrying heavy books and equipment AND being on your feet /on the move all day, as well as needing to talk and respond constantly to young children , rather than some professions where you can hide behind a computer or telephone. Teachers ARE effectively on 12month contracts as allocation of classes and teaching schedules -especially for part timers,are decided on a annual basis with no guarantee of who or what you might be teaching. There is relentless scrutiny -external inspections, internal appraisals, lesson observations against monstrous criteria that most people would struggle to fulfil once ket alone on multiple occasions. And how would you like your appraisal to be 'informed' by the opinion of an11,13,15year old given the power to slam their teachers if they simply don't like the subject or aren't getting good marks. This is 'student voice' . So why bother. Well more and more aren't and are leaving the profession with burn out/exhaustion,or dismissed. Most teachers are professionals. They are driven by passion for their subjects and a desire to transmit, share and foster this. They have studied to gain expertise in their subjects. They have to constantly adapt to new syllabuses -there have been changes every few years for each Key Stage.
And to distill the information to find the best way to work within the pathetically narrow government vision of what constitutes a rounded education, to try to bring this alive for their pupils. Unless you've been a teacher, and seen through a number of years you really don't know enough to comment with any credibility. Nursery workers would have similar experiences. How many of you could walk into a class of 30kids, keep and hold their attention, get them to learn something. Hour after hour, day after day. Then have to jump to with demands from managers and parents. Doubt you could. If you disrespect teaching and teachers you are doing a disservice to future generations.
Though I don't necessarily agree with the strike, most of you don't know what you are talking about. Teachers DO work to 6pm and well beyond, most days AND. Weekends. Week in week out. For frozen pay. Paperwork is monstrous-targets,tr acking, lesson preparation, marking . There is NO paid overtime but increasing number of late meetings/weekend duties AND educational trips that run into the holidays. During these 'luxurious'holidays teachers are often marking exam papers for 100's ofif kids,or being required to go in to help with 're purposing' of classrooms or checking if resources and materials. Teachers have 100's of interactions and demands every day, with YOUR children ,each one requiring something particular that needs to be followed through. Teachers teach class after class often not able to take a loo break and during 'breaks' are still on duty supervising kids in the playground for example. Teaching is physically demanding -carrying heavy books and equipment AND being on your feet /on the move all day, as well as needing to talk and respond constantly to young children , rather than some professions where you can hide behind a computer or telephone. Teachers ARE effectively on 12month contracts as allocation of classes and teaching schedules -especially for part timers,are decided on a annual basis with no guarantee of who or what you might be teaching. There is relentless scrutiny -external inspections, internal appraisals, lesson observations against monstrous criteria that most people would struggle to fulfil once ket alone on multiple occasions. And how would you like your appraisal to be 'informed' by the opinion of an11,13,15year old given the power to slam their teachers if they simply don't like the subject or aren't getting good marks. This is 'student voice' . So why bother. Well more and more aren't and are leaving the profession with burn out/exhaustion,or dismissed. Most teachers are professionals. They are driven by passion for their subjects and a desire to transmit, share and foster this. They have studied to gain expertise in their subjects. They have to constantly adapt to new syllabuses -there have been changes every few years for each Key Stage. And to distill the information to find the best way to work within the pathetically narrow government vision of what constitutes a rounded education, to try to bring this alive for their pupils. Unless you've been a teacher, and seen through a number of years you really don't know enough to comment with any credibility. Nursery workers would have similar experiences. How many of you could walk into a class of 30kids, keep and hold their attention, get them to learn something. Hour after hour, day after day. Then have to jump to with demands from managers and parents. Doubt you could. If you disrespect teaching and teachers you are doing a disservice to future generations. Wageslavemum
  • Score: 29

9:31pm Wed 9 Jul 14

Bluebeef says...

Wageslavemum wrote:
Though I don't necessarily agree with the strike, most of you don't know what you are talking about. Teachers DO work to 6pm and well beyond, most days AND. Weekends. Week in week out. For frozen pay. Paperwork is monstrous-targets,tr

acking, lesson preparation, marking . There is NO paid overtime but increasing number of late meetings/weekend duties AND educational trips that run into the holidays. During these 'luxurious'holidays teachers are often marking exam papers for 100's ofif kids,or being required to go in to help with 're purposing' of classrooms or checking if resources and materials. Teachers have 100's of interactions and demands every day, with YOUR children ,each one requiring something particular that needs to be followed through. Teachers teach class after class often not able to take a loo break and during 'breaks' are still on duty supervising kids in the playground for example. Teaching is physically demanding -carrying heavy books and equipment AND being on your feet /on the move all day, as well as needing to talk and respond constantly to young children , rather than some professions where you can hide behind a computer or telephone. Teachers ARE effectively on 12month contracts as allocation of classes and teaching schedules -especially for part timers,are decided on a annual basis with no guarantee of who or what you might be teaching. There is relentless scrutiny -external inspections, internal appraisals, lesson observations against monstrous criteria that most people would struggle to fulfil once ket alone on multiple occasions. And how would you like your appraisal to be 'informed' by the opinion of an11,13,15year old given the power to slam their teachers if they simply don't like the subject or aren't getting good marks. This is 'student voice' . So why bother. Well more and more aren't and are leaving the profession with burn out/exhaustion,or dismissed. Most teachers are professionals. They are driven by passion for their subjects and a desire to transmit, share and foster this. They have studied to gain expertise in their subjects. They have to constantly adapt to new syllabuses -there have been changes every few years for each Key Stage.
And to distill the information to find the best way to work within the pathetically narrow government vision of what constitutes a rounded education, to try to bring this alive for their pupils. Unless you've been a teacher, and seen through a number of years you really don't know enough to comment with any credibility. Nursery workers would have similar experiences. How many of you could walk into a class of 30kids, keep and hold their attention, get them to learn something. Hour after hour, day after day. Then have to jump to with demands from managers and parents. Doubt you could. If you disrespect teaching and teachers you are doing a disservice to future generations.
Ah bless
[quote][p][bold]Wageslavemum[/bold] wrote: Though I don't necessarily agree with the strike, most of you don't know what you are talking about. Teachers DO work to 6pm and well beyond, most days AND. Weekends. Week in week out. For frozen pay. Paperwork is monstrous-targets,tr acking, lesson preparation, marking . There is NO paid overtime but increasing number of late meetings/weekend duties AND educational trips that run into the holidays. During these 'luxurious'holidays teachers are often marking exam papers for 100's ofif kids,or being required to go in to help with 're purposing' of classrooms or checking if resources and materials. Teachers have 100's of interactions and demands every day, with YOUR children ,each one requiring something particular that needs to be followed through. Teachers teach class after class often not able to take a loo break and during 'breaks' are still on duty supervising kids in the playground for example. Teaching is physically demanding -carrying heavy books and equipment AND being on your feet /on the move all day, as well as needing to talk and respond constantly to young children , rather than some professions where you can hide behind a computer or telephone. Teachers ARE effectively on 12month contracts as allocation of classes and teaching schedules -especially for part timers,are decided on a annual basis with no guarantee of who or what you might be teaching. There is relentless scrutiny -external inspections, internal appraisals, lesson observations against monstrous criteria that most people would struggle to fulfil once ket alone on multiple occasions. And how would you like your appraisal to be 'informed' by the opinion of an11,13,15year old given the power to slam their teachers if they simply don't like the subject or aren't getting good marks. This is 'student voice' . So why bother. Well more and more aren't and are leaving the profession with burn out/exhaustion,or dismissed. Most teachers are professionals. They are driven by passion for their subjects and a desire to transmit, share and foster this. They have studied to gain expertise in their subjects. They have to constantly adapt to new syllabuses -there have been changes every few years for each Key Stage. And to distill the information to find the best way to work within the pathetically narrow government vision of what constitutes a rounded education, to try to bring this alive for their pupils. Unless you've been a teacher, and seen through a number of years you really don't know enough to comment with any credibility. Nursery workers would have similar experiences. How many of you could walk into a class of 30kids, keep and hold their attention, get them to learn something. Hour after hour, day after day. Then have to jump to with demands from managers and parents. Doubt you could. If you disrespect teaching and teachers you are doing a disservice to future generations.[/p][/quote]Ah bless Bluebeef
  • Score: -24

6:35am Thu 10 Jul 14

DCCCCCC says...

richardpowell40 wrote:
If we take out our kids in term time we get fined, but when the teachers take strike action we have to accept it ! We,the parents then have to take time off or find care for our children. What with all the inset days and school holidays they must get about 5 months off a year !!!
Same old, same old. Person with no clue......again,
[quote][p][bold]richardpowell40[/bold] wrote: If we take out our kids in term time we get fined, but when the teachers take strike action we have to accept it ! We,the parents then have to take time off or find care for our children. What with all the inset days and school holidays they must get about 5 months off a year !!![/p][/quote]Same old, same old. Person with no clue......again, DCCCCCC
  • Score: 14

6:46am Thu 10 Jul 14

DCCCCCC says...

Wageslavemum wrote:
Though I don't necessarily agree with the strike, most of you don't know what you are talking about. Teachers DO work to 6pm and well beyond, most days AND. Weekends. Week in week out. For frozen pay. Paperwork is monstrous-targets,tr

acking, lesson preparation, marking . There is NO paid overtime but increasing number of late meetings/weekend duties AND educational trips that run into the holidays. During these 'luxurious'holidays teachers are often marking exam papers for 100's ofif kids,or being required to go in to help with 're purposing' of classrooms or checking if resources and materials. Teachers have 100's of interactions and demands every day, with YOUR children ,each one requiring something particular that needs to be followed through. Teachers teach class after class often not able to take a loo break and during 'breaks' are still on duty supervising kids in the playground for example. Teaching is physically demanding -carrying heavy books and equipment AND being on your feet /on the move all day, as well as needing to talk and respond constantly to young children , rather than some professions where you can hide behind a computer or telephone. Teachers ARE effectively on 12month contracts as allocation of classes and teaching schedules -especially for part timers,are decided on a annual basis with no guarantee of who or what you might be teaching. There is relentless scrutiny -external inspections, internal appraisals, lesson observations against monstrous criteria that most people would struggle to fulfil once ket alone on multiple occasions. And how would you like your appraisal to be 'informed' by the opinion of an11,13,15year old given the power to slam their teachers if they simply don't like the subject or aren't getting good marks. This is 'student voice' . So why bother. Well more and more aren't and are leaving the profession with burn out/exhaustion,or dismissed. Most teachers are professionals. They are driven by passion for their subjects and a desire to transmit, share and foster this. They have studied to gain expertise in their subjects. They have to constantly adapt to new syllabuses -there have been changes every few years for each Key Stage.
And to distill the information to find the best way to work within the pathetically narrow government vision of what constitutes a rounded education, to try to bring this alive for their pupils. Unless you've been a teacher, and seen through a number of years you really don't know enough to comment with any credibility. Nursery workers would have similar experiences. How many of you could walk into a class of 30kids, keep and hold their attention, get them to learn something. Hour after hour, day after day. Then have to jump to with demands from managers and parents. Doubt you could. If you disrespect teaching and teachers you are doing a disservice to future generations.
No, I'm not a teacher but I know many who are and you, in my opinion have summed up their role very well. I know several who are leaving to work elsewhere due to the pressure they are under and what the job has become. It is sad that many ignorant public see their kids going to school 8.30 to 3 and having the long holidays and believe that teachers do the same. No I don't agree with parents being fined if they take their kids out of school for holidays, this is the only way many parents can afford to holiday but the teachers didn't make this rule. Teachers are damned if they do and damned if they don't.
[quote][p][bold]Wageslavemum[/bold] wrote: Though I don't necessarily agree with the strike, most of you don't know what you are talking about. Teachers DO work to 6pm and well beyond, most days AND. Weekends. Week in week out. For frozen pay. Paperwork is monstrous-targets,tr acking, lesson preparation, marking . There is NO paid overtime but increasing number of late meetings/weekend duties AND educational trips that run into the holidays. During these 'luxurious'holidays teachers are often marking exam papers for 100's ofif kids,or being required to go in to help with 're purposing' of classrooms or checking if resources and materials. Teachers have 100's of interactions and demands every day, with YOUR children ,each one requiring something particular that needs to be followed through. Teachers teach class after class often not able to take a loo break and during 'breaks' are still on duty supervising kids in the playground for example. Teaching is physically demanding -carrying heavy books and equipment AND being on your feet /on the move all day, as well as needing to talk and respond constantly to young children , rather than some professions where you can hide behind a computer or telephone. Teachers ARE effectively on 12month contracts as allocation of classes and teaching schedules -especially for part timers,are decided on a annual basis with no guarantee of who or what you might be teaching. There is relentless scrutiny -external inspections, internal appraisals, lesson observations against monstrous criteria that most people would struggle to fulfil once ket alone on multiple occasions. And how would you like your appraisal to be 'informed' by the opinion of an11,13,15year old given the power to slam their teachers if they simply don't like the subject or aren't getting good marks. This is 'student voice' . So why bother. Well more and more aren't and are leaving the profession with burn out/exhaustion,or dismissed. Most teachers are professionals. They are driven by passion for their subjects and a desire to transmit, share and foster this. They have studied to gain expertise in their subjects. They have to constantly adapt to new syllabuses -there have been changes every few years for each Key Stage. And to distill the information to find the best way to work within the pathetically narrow government vision of what constitutes a rounded education, to try to bring this alive for their pupils. Unless you've been a teacher, and seen through a number of years you really don't know enough to comment with any credibility. Nursery workers would have similar experiences. How many of you could walk into a class of 30kids, keep and hold their attention, get them to learn something. Hour after hour, day after day. Then have to jump to with demands from managers and parents. Doubt you could. If you disrespect teaching and teachers you are doing a disservice to future generations.[/p][/quote]No, I'm not a teacher but I know many who are and you, in my opinion have summed up their role very well. I know several who are leaving to work elsewhere due to the pressure they are under and what the job has become. It is sad that many ignorant public see their kids going to school 8.30 to 3 and having the long holidays and believe that teachers do the same. No I don't agree with parents being fined if they take their kids out of school for holidays, this is the only way many parents can afford to holiday but the teachers didn't make this rule. Teachers are damned if they do and damned if they don't. DCCCCCC
  • Score: 33

7:03am Thu 10 Jul 14

her professional says...

TROY44 wrote:
her professional wrote:
TROY44 wrote:
PenPushingPauper wrote:
Predictably bigoted, ignorant comments from the Argus readers... You only have to watch the news or look out the window once in a while to know that teachers are being squeezed to the point of ridiculousness.

Striking is a last resort... It doesn't benefit anyone but it serves to open the ears of those at the top who have thus far refused to listen. We should be supporting the teachers.

And if you have a problem with it... Maybe take it up with the people ACTUALLY causing the problem instead of making vile comments on a local news site.
No one would care if you striked every week.
Its getting Oh so .............yawn Boring
Killer argument from Troy. Bet you were a joy to teach.
I Had respect for my teachers, they never went on strike. They were not softie days.
We went too shool when it snowed. The school never closed for snowflakes or insect days.

Teachers have it far too easy. Its now time to change lets get teachers in that can do the job.
Bring in 12 month contracts. Then weed out the trouble makers and the softies.
Keep schools open till 6pm and reduce the holidays to 4 weeks per year. Like the rest of the working class.
Shame they didn't teach you English.
[quote][p][bold]TROY44[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]her professional[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]TROY44[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]PenPushingPauper[/bold] wrote: Predictably bigoted, ignorant comments from the Argus readers... You only have to watch the news or look out the window once in a while to know that teachers are being squeezed to the point of ridiculousness. Striking is a last resort... It doesn't benefit anyone but it serves to open the ears of those at the top who have thus far refused to listen. We should be supporting the teachers. And if you have a problem with it... Maybe take it up with the people ACTUALLY causing the problem instead of making vile comments on a local news site.[/p][/quote]No one would care if you striked every week. Its getting Oh so .............yawn Boring[/p][/quote]Killer argument from Troy. Bet you were a joy to teach.[/p][/quote]I Had respect for my teachers, they never went on strike. They were not softie days. We went too shool when it snowed. The school never closed for snowflakes or insect days. Teachers have it far too easy. Its now time to change lets get teachers in that can do the job. Bring in 12 month contracts. Then weed out the trouble makers and the softies. Keep schools open till 6pm and reduce the holidays to 4 weeks per year. Like the rest of the working class.[/p][/quote]Shame they didn't teach you English. her professional
  • Score: 24

7:15am Thu 10 Jul 14

her professional says...

Bluebeef wrote:
her professional wrote:
Bluebeef wrote:
her professional wrote:
Bluebeef wrote:
When thinking about this never forget who these unions sponsor: yes it's Ed the Marxist genes Milliband
These unions are all that's left to protect peoples' working conditions. Remember who is backing the Tories, shady tax avoiding "businessmen" lobbying for their own interests. at least the Unions represent the people who voted for them, Tory backers represent only themselves.
As for the "Marxist Genes" tag, absolutely pathetic.
Were you alive in the 70s: this country was nearly brought to its knees by the activities of politically motivated, Communist, Trotskyist, Marxist dominated unions who amongst other little gems forced a three-day week.
Pathetic: Do you actually listen to Miliband's messages he wants to take as much further to the left.
Yes I was alive and employed during the 70s. Just because the unions were arguably too powerful then doesn't make them inherently bad, the pendulum has swung back too far the other way. And whilst parroting the "red Ed backed by the Unions" mantra, you fail to address my point regarding the shady backers of the Tories ( and UKIP for that matter). Of course he'll take us to the left, he leads the Labour Party, get the idea. That way you have a choice of people on the political spectrum to vote for, and a significant proportion of voters would like something a bit more radical, just how many will be revealed at the election.
The only way to avoid patronage of political parties and the subsequent influence of their backers would be to have all parties funded from taxation, probably not a popular idea in the current climate!
What a silly patronising response: the point I keep trying to make is that Ed wants to take us far to the left of our previous New Labour government but a distressing percentage of potential voters don't realise that. I really don't think I need to respond to your limp shady backers for Tories point every time I want to criticise Red Ed.
I also happen to have dealt with unions in a number of circumstances and at an individual support level consider them worthwhile and intelligent:it is when they start flexing their political muscles with nothing remotely approaching a majority of the members in favour of strike action that I am reminded of the grim days of the 70s.

As it happens I agree with you; removing patronage from political parties would be a tremendous idea and relative to the overall burden of taxation cost would be negligible
So saying that most voters don't realise what red Ed's up to isn't patronising?
I have also spent many years dealing with unions in my workplace. Some excellent TU reps, some not so good and some plain disruptive - all part of the cut and thrust and up to management to win the arguments.
Tory backers? If you don't want to discuss, fair enough, let others draw their own conclusions.
[quote][p][bold]Bluebeef[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]her professional[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Bluebeef[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]her professional[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Bluebeef[/bold] wrote: When thinking about this never forget who these unions sponsor: yes it's Ed the Marxist genes Milliband[/p][/quote]These unions are all that's left to protect peoples' working conditions. Remember who is backing the Tories, shady tax avoiding "businessmen" lobbying for their own interests. at least the Unions represent the people who voted for them, Tory backers represent only themselves. As for the "Marxist Genes" tag, absolutely pathetic.[/p][/quote]Were you alive in the 70s: this country was nearly brought to its knees by the activities of politically motivated, Communist, Trotskyist, Marxist dominated unions who amongst other little gems forced a three-day week. Pathetic: Do you actually listen to Miliband's messages he wants to take as much further to the left.[/p][/quote]Yes I was alive and employed during the 70s. Just because the unions were arguably too powerful then doesn't make them inherently bad, the pendulum has swung back too far the other way. And whilst parroting the "red Ed backed by the Unions" mantra, you fail to address my point regarding the shady backers of the Tories ( and UKIP for that matter). Of course he'll take us to the left, he leads the Labour Party, get the idea. That way you have a choice of people on the political spectrum to vote for, and a significant proportion of voters would like something a bit more radical, just how many will be revealed at the election. The only way to avoid patronage of political parties and the subsequent influence of their backers would be to have all parties funded from taxation, probably not a popular idea in the current climate![/p][/quote]What a silly patronising response: the point I keep trying to make is that Ed wants to take us far to the left of our previous New Labour government but a distressing percentage of potential voters don't realise that. I really don't think I need to respond to your limp shady backers for Tories point every time I want to criticise Red Ed. I also happen to have dealt with unions in a number of circumstances and at an individual support level consider them worthwhile and intelligent:it is when they start flexing their political muscles with nothing remotely approaching a majority of the members in favour of strike action that I am reminded of the grim days of the 70s. As it happens I agree with you; removing patronage from political parties would be a tremendous idea and relative to the overall burden of taxation cost would be negligible[/p][/quote]So saying that most voters don't realise what red Ed's up to isn't patronising? I have also spent many years dealing with unions in my workplace. Some excellent TU reps, some not so good and some plain disruptive - all part of the cut and thrust and up to management to win the arguments. Tory backers? If you don't want to discuss, fair enough, let others draw their own conclusions. her professional
  • Score: -2

7:48am Thu 10 Jul 14

RK_Brighton says...

matlock wrote:
What hypocrisy. Taking kids on holiday harms their education, but it's ok for schools to close for strike action, apparently?
The Government are the ones who have allowed and pushed for fines for people who take children out of school.

The same government who are causing this strike by treating teachers badly.

Classroom teachers just have to follow rules when it comes to term time holidays.

So don't let the Governemtn drive a wedge between teachers and parents. You're issues are both caused by the same group. Unite and fight the government, not each other.
[quote][p][bold]matlock[/bold] wrote: What hypocrisy. Taking kids on holiday harms their education, but it's ok for schools to close for strike action, apparently?[/p][/quote]The Government are the ones who have allowed and pushed for fines for people who take children out of school. The same government who are causing this strike by treating teachers badly. Classroom teachers just have to follow rules when it comes to term time holidays. So don't let the Governemtn drive a wedge between teachers and parents. You're issues are both caused by the same group. Unite and fight the government, not each other. RK_Brighton
  • Score: 16

8:44am Thu 10 Jul 14

Maxwell's Ghost says...

The spelling and grammar in many of the posts criticising teachers is very poor. Perhaps these individuals failed to thrive at school and are now taking it out on teachers. I particularly enjoyed the post by the person who stated: "We even went too school when it snowed."
For those who think teachers have a good deal, why not get a teaching job? Academies will now employ non-qualified staff to teach.
For those moaning about unions and the Marxist state, we are in a free market and you have the choice to send your children to private school. They aren't that expensive.
The spelling and grammar in many of the posts criticising teachers is very poor. Perhaps these individuals failed to thrive at school and are now taking it out on teachers. I particularly enjoyed the post by the person who stated: "We even went too school when it snowed." For those who think teachers have a good deal, why not get a teaching job? Academies will now employ non-qualified staff to teach. For those moaning about unions and the Marxist state, we are in a free market and you have the choice to send your children to private school. They aren't that expensive. Maxwell's Ghost
  • Score: 14

9:01am Thu 10 Jul 14

pun master says...

Ok, some facts and opinions:

(and for the record, I am most definitely no left winger)

1) The Government made the rule about no holidays during term time, not the schools - most schools hate it because of the conflict it causes with parents

2) Yes - teachers do have a lot of holiday time - this is mainly historical and in line with many other countries - and not as much as private schools where many of the politicians were educated. However, surveys about school holiday tend to have the majority of parents in favour because of the time they get to spend with their children

3) No - teachers are not the only ones that work really long weeks, and we have the benefit of more holidays - but why are so many trying to make this a race to the bottom rather than a race to the top - this is exactly what this Government's agenda is - to drive a wedge between private and public sector workers - when in fact we should all be fighting together against the Government to make sure every worker in this country gets a fair deal in terms of a good pension, decent living wage, protected working hours, etc.

4) Yes, it does seem as though teachers are always moaning about their working conditions; however, virtually every teacher I know is passionate about education and the quality of education they are able to deliver, which is largely what they are striking about - however, it is illegal to strike on the basis of the 'idealogy of education' because it has to be to do with pay and conditions. Again, I don't know of any teachers who are against inspection and public accountability - it is the narrow mindedness of the Government and the Inspectorate that is causing the most friction.

5) Yes, some teachers don't run a great classroom - but over the last twenty years schools have increasingly been seen as the cure to society's ills - its schools that are supposed to make good citizens of their students, look out for potential terrorists, stop knife crime, be on the lookout for FGM, teach the children how to behave, and so on. The biggest problem in the classroom is behaviour - school's have no choice but to be 'inclusive,' and unfortunately that means that the kids with anger issues, challenging behaviour and the like have to be allowed into the classroom, and there is very little the schools can do about that. When was the last time you heard the Prime Minister of any Government speak up against the poor quality of some parenting - poorly behaved children are the responsibility of their parents, so it is those parents who take no responsibility for their children's behaviour, those parents who never support schools with sanctions, those parents who empower their children to laugh in the face of any authority figure that are causing just as many issues and damaging the quality of education.

So I urge you all - and even the posters on here against the teachers clearly have an interest in education - to think about the real problems behind this strike, and get onto your MP's to sort the root problems of education in this country out, and to make sure that every worker in this country gets decent working rights, rather than trying to bring down those that are standing up for theirs - because that plays right into the hands of the political establishment...
Ok, some facts and opinions: (and for the record, I am most definitely no left winger) 1) The Government made the rule about no holidays during term time, not the schools - most schools hate it because of the conflict it causes with parents 2) Yes - teachers do have a lot of holiday time - this is mainly historical and in line with many other countries - and not as much as private schools where many of the politicians were educated. However, surveys about school holiday tend to have the majority of parents in favour because of the time they get to spend with their children 3) No - teachers are not the only ones that work really long weeks, and we have the benefit of more holidays - but why are so many trying to make this a race to the bottom rather than a race to the top - this is exactly what this Government's agenda is - to drive a wedge between private and public sector workers - when in fact we should all be fighting together against the Government to make sure every worker in this country gets a fair deal in terms of a good pension, decent living wage, protected working hours, etc. 4) Yes, it does seem as though teachers are always moaning about their working conditions; however, virtually every teacher I know is passionate about education and the quality of education they are able to deliver, which is largely what they are striking about - however, it is illegal to strike on the basis of the 'idealogy of education' because it has to be to do with pay and conditions. Again, I don't know of any teachers who are against inspection and public accountability - it is the narrow mindedness of the Government and the Inspectorate that is causing the most friction. 5) Yes, some teachers don't run a great classroom - but over the last twenty years schools have increasingly been seen as the cure to society's ills - its schools that are supposed to make good citizens of their students, look out for potential terrorists, stop knife crime, be on the lookout for FGM, teach the children how to behave, and so on. The biggest problem in the classroom is behaviour - school's have no choice but to be 'inclusive,' and unfortunately that means that the kids with anger issues, challenging behaviour and the like have to be allowed into the classroom, and there is very little the schools can do about that. When was the last time you heard the Prime Minister of any Government speak up against the poor quality of some parenting - poorly behaved children are the responsibility of their parents, so it is those parents who take no responsibility for their children's behaviour, those parents who never support schools with sanctions, those parents who empower their children to laugh in the face of any authority figure that are causing just as many issues and damaging the quality of education. So I urge you all - and even the posters on here against the teachers clearly have an interest in education - to think about the real problems behind this strike, and get onto your MP's to sort the root problems of education in this country out, and to make sure that every worker in this country gets decent working rights, rather than trying to bring down those that are standing up for theirs - because that plays right into the hands of the political establishment... pun master
  • Score: 23

9:04am Thu 10 Jul 14

Quiterie says...

Maxwell's Ghost wrote:
The spelling and grammar in many of the posts criticising teachers is very poor. Perhaps these individuals failed to thrive at school and are now taking it out on teachers. I particularly enjoyed the post by the person who stated: "We even went too school when it snowed."
For those who think teachers have a good deal, why not get a teaching job? Academies will now employ non-qualified staff to teach.
For those moaning about unions and the Marxist state, we are in a free market and you have the choice to send your children to private school. They aren't that expensive.
Exactly. When you see people calling teachers "disgusting animals" or emphasising their point with "WTF" you know you've got the moral high ground.....
[quote][p][bold]Maxwell's Ghost[/bold] wrote: The spelling and grammar in many of the posts criticising teachers is very poor. Perhaps these individuals failed to thrive at school and are now taking it out on teachers. I particularly enjoyed the post by the person who stated: "We even went too school when it snowed." For those who think teachers have a good deal, why not get a teaching job? Academies will now employ non-qualified staff to teach. For those moaning about unions and the Marxist state, we are in a free market and you have the choice to send your children to private school. They aren't that expensive.[/p][/quote]Exactly. When you see people calling teachers "disgusting animals" or emphasising their point with "WTF" you know you've got the moral high ground..... Quiterie
  • Score: 8

9:12am Thu 10 Jul 14

Max Ripple says...

wexler53 wrote:
Striking is the last resort of the mentally challenged...

These people don't know when they are well off. The reality is that they are still far from catching up with real life. With a few exceptions, none of them would cut it in the private sector.

And it's the private sector that provides the tax revenues to pay for their superb job conditions. It's a long time since we've seen any pay rises, certainly no job security for sure.

And before anyone goes on about public workers paying tax too, well they might but it's only recycling private tax revenues. No new money from them.

But in a politically correct work environment where turning up is enough, they're alright, nice and secure with good pensions to look forward to. Striking really is an easy option.
You are obviously someone who works in an industry with decent working conditions, the right to paid holidays, maternity pay for women, health and safety measures (which you are probably not even aware of), maybe a reasonable level of pay and the right to claim unfair dismissal if you are thrown out of your job. Do you think these workers rights grew on trees or were handed down on tablets of stone from the man on high? NO - these rights which you so blithely ignore and forget about we're fought for by workers who had to stand up for themselves and sometimes that involves striking. People in this country have forgotten what unions have done for workers in the past and how they continue to stand up for their rights and conditions now. Maggie Thatcher destroyed unions in this country and successive governments (including Labour in some ways) have whittled down their abilities to negotiate on our behalf.
Next time you need someone to stand up for you, or your son or daughter needs someone to help them with working conditions remember that trade unions are the ones who help in these instances.
[quote][p][bold]wexler53[/bold] wrote: Striking is the last resort of the mentally challenged... These people don't know when they are well off. The reality is that they are still far from catching up with real life. With a few exceptions, none of them would cut it in the private sector. And it's the private sector that provides the tax revenues to pay for their superb job conditions. It's a long time since we've seen any pay rises, certainly no job security for sure. And before anyone goes on about public workers paying tax too, well they might but it's only recycling private tax revenues. No new money from them. But in a politically correct work environment where turning up is enough, they're alright, nice and secure with good pensions to look forward to. Striking really is an easy option.[/p][/quote]You are obviously someone who works in an industry with decent working conditions, the right to paid holidays, maternity pay for women, health and safety measures (which you are probably not even aware of), maybe a reasonable level of pay and the right to claim unfair dismissal if you are thrown out of your job. Do you think these workers rights grew on trees or were handed down on tablets of stone from the man on high? NO - these rights which you so blithely ignore and forget about we're fought for by workers who had to stand up for themselves and sometimes that involves striking. People in this country have forgotten what unions have done for workers in the past and how they continue to stand up for their rights and conditions now. Maggie Thatcher destroyed unions in this country and successive governments (including Labour in some ways) have whittled down their abilities to negotiate on our behalf. Next time you need someone to stand up for you, or your son or daughter needs someone to help them with working conditions remember that trade unions are the ones who help in these instances. Max Ripple
  • Score: 5

9:16am Thu 10 Jul 14

brightoncorsadriver says...

Jules boy wrote:
cookie_brighton wrote:
now will these teachers who close schools be fined as we, the parents are, if we take our children out of school for 1 day or more....
teachers showing no respect for their jobs in tough economic times
So the teachers that are striking for better working conditions aren't respecting their jobs? Surely better working conditions for the teachers will directly result in better resources, lessons, learning environment and therefore education for your children? Do you not want that?

I would LOVE to see all the people on here that are so quick to put down the teachers, actually teach for a week. Planning, marking, teaching, differentiating and observations,
[quote][p][bold]Jules boy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]cookie_brighton[/bold] wrote: now will these teachers who close schools be fined as we, the parents are, if we take our children out of school for 1 day or more....[/p][/quote]teachers showing no respect for their jobs in tough economic times[/p][/quote]So the teachers that are striking for better working conditions aren't respecting their jobs? Surely better working conditions for the teachers will directly result in better resources, lessons, learning environment and therefore education for your children? Do you not want that? I would LOVE to see all the people on here that are so quick to put down the teachers, actually teach for a week. Planning, marking, teaching, differentiating and observations, brightoncorsadriver
  • Score: 7

9:17am Thu 10 Jul 14

Bluebeef says...

her professional wrote:
Bluebeef wrote:
her professional wrote:
Bluebeef wrote:
her professional wrote:
Bluebeef wrote:
When thinking about this never forget who these unions sponsor: yes it's Ed the Marxist genes Milliband
These unions are all that's left to protect peoples' working conditions. Remember who is backing the Tories, shady tax avoiding "businessmen" lobbying for their own interests. at least the Unions represent the people who voted for them, Tory backers represent only themselves.
As for the "Marxist Genes" tag, absolutely pathetic.
Were you alive in the 70s: this country was nearly brought to its knees by the activities of politically motivated, Communist, Trotskyist, Marxist dominated unions who amongst other little gems forced a three-day week.
Pathetic: Do you actually listen to Miliband's messages he wants to take as much further to the left.
Yes I was alive and employed during the 70s. Just because the unions were arguably too powerful then doesn't make them inherently bad, the pendulum has swung back too far the other way. And whilst parroting the "red Ed backed by the Unions" mantra, you fail to address my point regarding the shady backers of the Tories ( and UKIP for that matter). Of course he'll take us to the left, he leads the Labour Party, get the idea. That way you have a choice of people on the political spectrum to vote for, and a significant proportion of voters would like something a bit more radical, just how many will be revealed at the election.
The only way to avoid patronage of political parties and the subsequent influence of their backers would be to have all parties funded from taxation, probably not a popular idea in the current climate!
What a silly patronising response: the point I keep trying to make is that Ed wants to take us far to the left of our previous New Labour government but a distressing percentage of potential voters don't realise that. I really don't think I need to respond to your limp shady backers for Tories point every time I want to criticise Red Ed.
I also happen to have dealt with unions in a number of circumstances and at an individual support level consider them worthwhile and intelligent:it is when they start flexing their political muscles with nothing remotely approaching a majority of the members in favour of strike action that I am reminded of the grim days of the 70s.

As it happens I agree with you; removing patronage from political parties would be a tremendous idea and relative to the overall burden of taxation cost would be negligible
So saying that most voters don't realise what red Ed's up to isn't patronising?
I have also spent many years dealing with unions in my workplace. Some excellent TU reps, some not so good and some plain disruptive - all part of the cut and thrust and up to management to win the arguments.
Tory backers? If you don't want to discuss, fair enough, let others draw their own conclusions.
no it isn't patronising: Red Ed's hard left tendencies are concealed under a patina of sweetness and light PR spin.
Having agreed that unions have an important place in the workplace, and also very much agreeing with your assessment of TU reps, it worries me that you imply the closure of schools and loss of education for innocent children 'the cut and thrust' . I don't think so........

Tory backers: as far as I'm concerned this post is about Red Ed, teachers and unions: it is a rather juvenile method of arguing much used by politicians that when any criticism is made, mud is thrown back instead of intelligible counter arguments.

Very happy to have the argument based on facts on a completely separate day: the two should not be co-mingled.
[quote][p][bold]her professional[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Bluebeef[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]her professional[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Bluebeef[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]her professional[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Bluebeef[/bold] wrote: When thinking about this never forget who these unions sponsor: yes it's Ed the Marxist genes Milliband[/p][/quote]These unions are all that's left to protect peoples' working conditions. Remember who is backing the Tories, shady tax avoiding "businessmen" lobbying for their own interests. at least the Unions represent the people who voted for them, Tory backers represent only themselves. As for the "Marxist Genes" tag, absolutely pathetic.[/p][/quote]Were you alive in the 70s: this country was nearly brought to its knees by the activities of politically motivated, Communist, Trotskyist, Marxist dominated unions who amongst other little gems forced a three-day week. Pathetic: Do you actually listen to Miliband's messages he wants to take as much further to the left.[/p][/quote]Yes I was alive and employed during the 70s. Just because the unions were arguably too powerful then doesn't make them inherently bad, the pendulum has swung back too far the other way. And whilst parroting the "red Ed backed by the Unions" mantra, you fail to address my point regarding the shady backers of the Tories ( and UKIP for that matter). Of course he'll take us to the left, he leads the Labour Party, get the idea. That way you have a choice of people on the political spectrum to vote for, and a significant proportion of voters would like something a bit more radical, just how many will be revealed at the election. The only way to avoid patronage of political parties and the subsequent influence of their backers would be to have all parties funded from taxation, probably not a popular idea in the current climate![/p][/quote]What a silly patronising response: the point I keep trying to make is that Ed wants to take us far to the left of our previous New Labour government but a distressing percentage of potential voters don't realise that. I really don't think I need to respond to your limp shady backers for Tories point every time I want to criticise Red Ed. I also happen to have dealt with unions in a number of circumstances and at an individual support level consider them worthwhile and intelligent:it is when they start flexing their political muscles with nothing remotely approaching a majority of the members in favour of strike action that I am reminded of the grim days of the 70s. As it happens I agree with you; removing patronage from political parties would be a tremendous idea and relative to the overall burden of taxation cost would be negligible[/p][/quote]So saying that most voters don't realise what red Ed's up to isn't patronising? I have also spent many years dealing with unions in my workplace. Some excellent TU reps, some not so good and some plain disruptive - all part of the cut and thrust and up to management to win the arguments. Tory backers? If you don't want to discuss, fair enough, let others draw their own conclusions.[/p][/quote]no it isn't patronising: Red Ed's hard left tendencies are concealed under a patina of sweetness and light PR spin. Having agreed that unions have an important place in the workplace, and also very much agreeing with your assessment of TU reps, it worries me that you imply the closure of schools and loss of education for innocent children 'the cut and thrust' . I don't think so........ Tory backers: as far as I'm concerned this post is about Red Ed, teachers and unions: it is a rather juvenile method of arguing much used by politicians that when any criticism is made, mud is thrown back instead of intelligible counter arguments. Very happy to have the argument based on facts on a completely separate day: the two should not be co-mingled. Bluebeef
  • Score: -2

10:15am Thu 10 Jul 14

mhaiti says...

For those that say teacher's couldn't hack it in the private sector, where do you get the evidence of this from?

If what you say is true then what does that say about you, that you are willing to allow your children / grandchildren to be educated and prepared for life by someone who couldn't work in let's say middle management at a bank?

That is absolute rubbish, teaching is a hard career that pays considerably less that a role with the equivalent responsibility in the private sector, the hours are long (not 8-4) and their comparable percentage of salary for pension contributions are much higher than those in the private sector . Everyone I know who has gone in to teaching has done so out of passion for the job, not for the final salary pension (doesn't exist anymore) or the salary.

I have worked in both the public and provate sector and have found no real variance in the skills or professionalism of workers in either, the main difference is the layering of middle management and ultimately decision makers in the public sector. These are the people that are happy to sell off our kids' education to the highest bidder to make a profit out of their development. You expect that in the private sector as it's all about the shareholder but how can anyone justify making a profit out of teaching children??
For those that say teacher's couldn't hack it in the private sector, where do you get the evidence of this from? If what you say is true then what does that say about you, that you are willing to allow your children / grandchildren to be educated and prepared for life by someone who couldn't work in let's say middle management at a bank? That is absolute rubbish, teaching is a hard career that pays considerably less that a role with the equivalent responsibility in the private sector, the hours are long (not 8-4) and their comparable percentage of salary for pension contributions are much higher than those in the private sector . Everyone I know who has gone in to teaching has done so out of passion for the job, not for the final salary pension (doesn't exist anymore) or the salary. I have worked in both the public and provate sector and have found no real variance in the skills or professionalism of workers in either, the main difference is the layering of middle management and ultimately decision makers in the public sector. These are the people that are happy to sell off our kids' education to the highest bidder to make a profit out of their development. You expect that in the private sector as it's all about the shareholder but how can anyone justify making a profit out of teaching children?? mhaiti
  • Score: 5

12:30pm Thu 10 Jul 14

menton says...

Sack the lot of them useless, lazy s*ds.
Sack the lot of them useless, lazy s*ds. menton
  • Score: -4

12:33pm Thu 10 Jul 14

Tippy Toes says...

fredaj wrote:
Fight_Back wrote:
stevo!! wrote:
Fight_Back wrote:
matlock wrote:
What hypocrisy. Taking kids on holiday harms their education, but it's ok for schools to close for strike action, apparently?
Agreed. Let's add to that hypocrisy - a certain senior school in Hove currently has a number of pupils on a trip to France. Not all pupils could go as places were limited. The rest still have to go to school each day ( tomorrow excepted ! ). So how come those students that have been allowed on the trip aren't losing out on their education but when a parent does exactly the same they are ? Obviously the cynic in me suggests that teachers would miss their free foreign holiday paid for by parents so all of sudden there is justification for the trip.
It was an educational trip, so technically the kids were still being educated.
That may well be the case but it overlooks to key things :

1. A family holiday really can be educational

2. Have a guess what the pupils left behind have been doing in lessons ? Watching movies !!!!!
Taking kids out of school so Mum and Dad get a cheap holiday lounging by the pool is NOT educational and will never be educational.

And any suggestion that taking kids out of school for holidays is anything other than to save cash is not telling the truth.
Maybe the kind of holidays you have aren't educational but the ones I take my kids on are. I encourage my kids to try to speak the language, eat the local food and go and visit historical places. And what is your issue with families saving the cash? So basically its a case the have and the have not’s. People with money are able take their kids on holiday but the rest cant. Seems a little unfair to me. And ultimately the kids are missing out on family time together. I’m not suggesting that people make a habit of it, and it also depends on the children in involved ie are they well behaved hard working kids. But I think a bit of flexibility is good. What you are also forgetting is that not everyone can take time off during the term time.
[quote][p][bold]fredaj[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Fight_Back[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]stevo!![/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Fight_Back[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]matlock[/bold] wrote: What hypocrisy. Taking kids on holiday harms their education, but it's ok for schools to close for strike action, apparently?[/p][/quote]Agreed. Let's add to that hypocrisy - a certain senior school in Hove currently has a number of pupils on a trip to France. Not all pupils could go as places were limited. The rest still have to go to school each day ( tomorrow excepted ! ). So how come those students that have been allowed on the trip aren't losing out on their education but when a parent does exactly the same they are ? Obviously the cynic in me suggests that teachers would miss their free foreign holiday paid for by parents so all of sudden there is justification for the trip.[/p][/quote]It was an educational trip, so technically the kids were still being educated.[/p][/quote]That may well be the case but it overlooks to key things : 1. A family holiday really can be educational 2. Have a guess what the pupils left behind have been doing in lessons ? Watching movies !!!!![/p][/quote]Taking kids out of school so Mum and Dad get a cheap holiday lounging by the pool is NOT educational and will never be educational. And any suggestion that taking kids out of school for holidays is anything other than to save cash is not telling the truth.[/p][/quote]Maybe the kind of holidays you have aren't educational but the ones I take my kids on are. I encourage my kids to try to speak the language, eat the local food and go and visit historical places. And what is your issue with families saving the cash? So basically its a case the have and the have not’s. People with money are able take their kids on holiday but the rest cant. Seems a little unfair to me. And ultimately the kids are missing out on family time together. I’m not suggesting that people make a habit of it, and it also depends on the children in involved ie are they well behaved hard working kids. But I think a bit of flexibility is good. What you are also forgetting is that not everyone can take time off during the term time. Tippy Toes
  • Score: 0

12:43pm Thu 10 Jul 14

GJ12345 says...

Get back to work and stop wasting peoples time and money. you will never make a difference so what is the point.
Get back to work and stop wasting peoples time and money. you will never make a difference so what is the point. GJ12345
  • Score: -5

12:47pm Thu 10 Jul 14

stevo!! says...

"Surely better working conditions for the teachers will directly result in better resources, lessons, learning environment and therefore education for your children? "

How do better working conditions for teachers lead to better resources for the children?
"Surely better working conditions for the teachers will directly result in better resources, lessons, learning environment and therefore education for your children? " How do better working conditions for teachers lead to better resources for the children? stevo!!
  • Score: 0

3:05pm Thu 10 Jul 14

brightoncorsadriver says...

stevo!! wrote:
"Surely better working conditions for the teachers will directly result in better resources, lessons, learning environment and therefore education for your children? "

How do better working conditions for teachers lead to better resources for the children?
You are telling me that you would be more productive in your line of work with poorer working conditions than better working conditions?
[quote][p][bold]stevo!![/bold] wrote: "Surely better working conditions for the teachers will directly result in better resources, lessons, learning environment and therefore education for your children? " How do better working conditions for teachers lead to better resources for the children?[/p][/quote]You are telling me that you would be more productive in your line of work with poorer working conditions than better working conditions? brightoncorsadriver
  • Score: 1

3:57pm Thu 10 Jul 14

Jules boy says...

Really constructive day for the economy today, me and millions others not being able to work and provide a service for our country because of the strike.

Not to worry, the teachers will be back tomorrow nattering on their backsides in the staff room dunking biscuits into their mugs of tea, saying how wonderful they are and comparing plans for the weekend and summer holiday.
Really constructive day for the economy today, me and millions others not being able to work and provide a service for our country because of the strike. Not to worry, the teachers will be back tomorrow nattering on their backsides in the staff room dunking biscuits into their mugs of tea, saying how wonderful they are and comparing plans for the weekend and summer holiday. Jules boy
  • Score: 0

4:41pm Thu 10 Jul 14

stevo!! says...

brightoncorsadriver wrote:
stevo!! wrote:
"Surely better working conditions for the teachers will directly result in better resources, lessons, learning environment and therefore education for your children? "

How do better working conditions for teachers lead to better resources for the children?
You are telling me that you would be more productive in your line of work with poorer working conditions than better working conditions?
My comment referred to 'resources'.

Shame I had to point that out.
[quote][p][bold]brightoncorsadriver[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]stevo!![/bold] wrote: "Surely better working conditions for the teachers will directly result in better resources, lessons, learning environment and therefore education for your children? " How do better working conditions for teachers lead to better resources for the children?[/p][/quote]You are telling me that you would be more productive in your line of work with poorer working conditions than better working conditions?[/p][/quote]My comment referred to 'resources'. Shame I had to point that out. stevo!!
  • Score: -6

4:55pm Thu 10 Jul 14

DCCCCCC says...

Jules boy wrote:
Really constructive day for the economy today, me and millions others not being able to work and provide a service for our country because of the strike.

Not to worry, the teachers will be back tomorrow nattering on their backsides in the staff room dunking biscuits into their mugs of tea, saying how wonderful they are and comparing plans for the weekend and summer holiday.
You've been watching too much tv!
[quote][p][bold]Jules boy[/bold] wrote: Really constructive day for the economy today, me and millions others not being able to work and provide a service for our country because of the strike. Not to worry, the teachers will be back tomorrow nattering on their backsides in the staff room dunking biscuits into their mugs of tea, saying how wonderful they are and comparing plans for the weekend and summer holiday.[/p][/quote]You've been watching too much tv! DCCCCCC
  • Score: 0

9:31pm Thu 10 Jul 14

her professional says...

Bluebeef wrote:
her professional wrote:
Bluebeef wrote:
her professional wrote:
Bluebeef wrote:
her professional wrote:
Bluebeef wrote:
When thinking about this never forget who these unions sponsor: yes it's Ed the Marxist genes Milliband
These unions are all that's left to protect peoples' working conditions. Remember who is backing the Tories, shady tax avoiding "businessmen" lobbying for their own interests. at least the Unions represent the people who voted for them, Tory backers represent only themselves.
As for the "Marxist Genes" tag, absolutely pathetic.
Were you alive in the 70s: this country was nearly brought to its knees by the activities of politically motivated, Communist, Trotskyist, Marxist dominated unions who amongst other little gems forced a three-day week.
Pathetic: Do you actually listen to Miliband's messages he wants to take as much further to the left.
Yes I was alive and employed during the 70s. Just because the unions were arguably too powerful then doesn't make them inherently bad, the pendulum has swung back too far the other way. And whilst parroting the "red Ed backed by the Unions" mantra, you fail to address my point regarding the shady backers of the Tories ( and UKIP for that matter). Of course he'll take us to the left, he leads the Labour Party, get the idea. That way you have a choice of people on the political spectrum to vote for, and a significant proportion of voters would like something a bit more radical, just how many will be revealed at the election.
The only way to avoid patronage of political parties and the subsequent influence of their backers would be to have all parties funded from taxation, probably not a popular idea in the current climate!
What a silly patronising response: the point I keep trying to make is that Ed wants to take us far to the left of our previous New Labour government but a distressing percentage of potential voters don't realise that. I really don't think I need to respond to your limp shady backers for Tories point every time I want to criticise Red Ed.
I also happen to have dealt with unions in a number of circumstances and at an individual support level consider them worthwhile and intelligent:it is when they start flexing their political muscles with nothing remotely approaching a majority of the members in favour of strike action that I am reminded of the grim days of the 70s.

As it happens I agree with you; removing patronage from political parties would be a tremendous idea and relative to the overall burden of taxation cost would be negligible
So saying that most voters don't realise what red Ed's up to isn't patronising?
I have also spent many years dealing with unions in my workplace. Some excellent TU reps, some not so good and some plain disruptive - all part of the cut and thrust and up to management to win the arguments.
Tory backers? If you don't want to discuss, fair enough, let others draw their own conclusions.
no it isn't patronising: Red Ed's hard left tendencies are concealed under a patina of sweetness and light PR spin.
Having agreed that unions have an important place in the workplace, and also very much agreeing with your assessment of TU reps, it worries me that you imply the closure of schools and loss of education for innocent children 'the cut and thrust' . I don't think so........

Tory backers: as far as I'm concerned this post is about Red Ed, teachers and unions: it is a rather juvenile method of arguing much used by politicians that when any criticism is made, mud is thrown back instead of intelligible counter arguments.

Very happy to have the argument based on facts on a completely separate day: the two should not be co-mingled.
Ok, as far as I'm concerned it's absolutely fine for the Labour Party to receive funding from the trade unions. It's open, accountable, and at the end of the day the party grew out of the union movement. Absolutely nothing to be ashamed of. As another poster has pointed out, virtually all the benefits enjoyed by employees today were hard fought for by unions over the years. It was paid holidays plus working people having some disposable income (as well as the coming of the railway) that enabled Brighton to grow from a hard up fishing village , so better conditions benefitted the economy as a whole.
So, counter argument: the Union movement has nothing to be ashamed of. The loss of a days education for innocent children can just as easily be blamed on the government as on the unions/teachers.
[quote][p][bold]Bluebeef[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]her professional[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Bluebeef[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]her professional[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Bluebeef[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]her professional[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Bluebeef[/bold] wrote: When thinking about this never forget who these unions sponsor: yes it's Ed the Marxist genes Milliband[/p][/quote]These unions are all that's left to protect peoples' working conditions. Remember who is backing the Tories, shady tax avoiding "businessmen" lobbying for their own interests. at least the Unions represent the people who voted for them, Tory backers represent only themselves. As for the "Marxist Genes" tag, absolutely pathetic.[/p][/quote]Were you alive in the 70s: this country was nearly brought to its knees by the activities of politically motivated, Communist, Trotskyist, Marxist dominated unions who amongst other little gems forced a three-day week. Pathetic: Do you actually listen to Miliband's messages he wants to take as much further to the left.[/p][/quote]Yes I was alive and employed during the 70s. Just because the unions were arguably too powerful then doesn't make them inherently bad, the pendulum has swung back too far the other way. And whilst parroting the "red Ed backed by the Unions" mantra, you fail to address my point regarding the shady backers of the Tories ( and UKIP for that matter). Of course he'll take us to the left, he leads the Labour Party, get the idea. That way you have a choice of people on the political spectrum to vote for, and a significant proportion of voters would like something a bit more radical, just how many will be revealed at the election. The only way to avoid patronage of political parties and the subsequent influence of their backers would be to have all parties funded from taxation, probably not a popular idea in the current climate![/p][/quote]What a silly patronising response: the point I keep trying to make is that Ed wants to take us far to the left of our previous New Labour government but a distressing percentage of potential voters don't realise that. I really don't think I need to respond to your limp shady backers for Tories point every time I want to criticise Red Ed. I also happen to have dealt with unions in a number of circumstances and at an individual support level consider them worthwhile and intelligent:it is when they start flexing their political muscles with nothing remotely approaching a majority of the members in favour of strike action that I am reminded of the grim days of the 70s. As it happens I agree with you; removing patronage from political parties would be a tremendous idea and relative to the overall burden of taxation cost would be negligible[/p][/quote]So saying that most voters don't realise what red Ed's up to isn't patronising? I have also spent many years dealing with unions in my workplace. Some excellent TU reps, some not so good and some plain disruptive - all part of the cut and thrust and up to management to win the arguments. Tory backers? If you don't want to discuss, fair enough, let others draw their own conclusions.[/p][/quote]no it isn't patronising: Red Ed's hard left tendencies are concealed under a patina of sweetness and light PR spin. Having agreed that unions have an important place in the workplace, and also very much agreeing with your assessment of TU reps, it worries me that you imply the closure of schools and loss of education for innocent children 'the cut and thrust' . I don't think so........ Tory backers: as far as I'm concerned this post is about Red Ed, teachers and unions: it is a rather juvenile method of arguing much used by politicians that when any criticism is made, mud is thrown back instead of intelligible counter arguments. Very happy to have the argument based on facts on a completely separate day: the two should not be co-mingled.[/p][/quote]Ok, as far as I'm concerned it's absolutely fine for the Labour Party to receive funding from the trade unions. It's open, accountable, and at the end of the day the party grew out of the union movement. Absolutely nothing to be ashamed of. As another poster has pointed out, virtually all the benefits enjoyed by employees today were hard fought for by unions over the years. It was paid holidays plus working people having some disposable income (as well as the coming of the railway) that enabled Brighton to grow from a hard up fishing village , so better conditions benefitted the economy as a whole. So, counter argument: the Union movement has nothing to be ashamed of. The loss of a days education for innocent children can just as easily be blamed on the government as on the unions/teachers. her professional
  • Score: -2

9:33pm Thu 10 Jul 14

hubby says...

I am a teacher.
I am expected to teach children manners,how to behave in public,how to dress,how to keep themselves clean,how to eat,how to have respect for other people,punctuality etc,etc.
All things that parents can't be bothered to do these days.
This is before I start "Teaching".
I feel so sorry for the poor parents who couldn't throw their sprogs out of the door at 8am and retrieve them at 4pm.
Do some teaching yourselves lazy parents.
Be parents.Not mates with your kids.
I am a teacher. I am expected to teach children manners,how to behave in public,how to dress,how to keep themselves clean,how to eat,how to have respect for other people,punctuality etc,etc. All things that parents can't be bothered to do these days. This is before I start "Teaching". I feel so sorry for the poor parents who couldn't throw their sprogs out of the door at 8am and retrieve them at 4pm. Do some teaching yourselves lazy parents. Be parents.Not mates with your kids. hubby
  • Score: -2

10:20pm Thu 10 Jul 14

stevo!! says...

hubby wrote:
I am a teacher.
I am expected to teach children manners,how to behave in public,how to dress,how to keep themselves clean,how to eat,how to have respect for other people,punctuality etc,etc.
All things that parents can't be bothered to do these days.
This is before I start "Teaching".
I feel so sorry for the poor parents who couldn't throw their sprogs out of the door at 8am and retrieve them at 4pm.
Do some teaching yourselves lazy parents.
Be parents.Not mates with your kids.
Can I ask how the 'keeping oneself clean' lessons work?
[quote][p][bold]hubby[/bold] wrote: I am a teacher. I am expected to teach children manners,how to behave in public,how to dress,how to keep themselves clean,how to eat,how to have respect for other people,punctuality etc,etc. All things that parents can't be bothered to do these days. This is before I start "Teaching". I feel so sorry for the poor parents who couldn't throw their sprogs out of the door at 8am and retrieve them at 4pm. Do some teaching yourselves lazy parents. Be parents.Not mates with your kids.[/p][/quote]Can I ask how the 'keeping oneself clean' lessons work? stevo!!
  • Score: -5

10:55pm Thu 10 Jul 14

Bluebeef says...

her professional wrote:
Bluebeef wrote:
her professional wrote:
Bluebeef wrote:
her professional wrote:
Bluebeef wrote:
her professional wrote:
Bluebeef wrote:
When thinking about this never forget who these unions sponsor: yes it's Ed the Marxist genes Milliband
These unions are all that's left to protect peoples' working conditions. Remember who is backing the Tories, shady tax avoiding "businessmen" lobbying for their own interests. at least the Unions represent the people who voted for them, Tory backers represent only themselves.
As for the "Marxist Genes" tag, absolutely pathetic.
Were you alive in the 70s: this country was nearly brought to its knees by the activities of politically motivated, Communist, Trotskyist, Marxist dominated unions who amongst other little gems forced a three-day week.
Pathetic: Do you actually listen to Miliband's messages he wants to take as much further to the left.
Yes I was alive and employed during the 70s. Just because the unions were arguably too powerful then doesn't make them inherently bad, the pendulum has swung back too far the other way. And whilst parroting the "red Ed backed by the Unions" mantra, you fail to address my point regarding the shady backers of the Tories ( and UKIP for that matter). Of course he'll take us to the left, he leads the Labour Party, get the idea. That way you have a choice of people on the political spectrum to vote for, and a significant proportion of voters would like something a bit more radical, just how many will be revealed at the election.
The only way to avoid patronage of political parties and the subsequent influence of their backers would be to have all parties funded from taxation, probably not a popular idea in the current climate!
What a silly patronising response: the point I keep trying to make is that Ed wants to take us far to the left of our previous New Labour government but a distressing percentage of potential voters don't realise that. I really don't think I need to respond to your limp shady backers for Tories point every time I want to criticise Red Ed.
I also happen to have dealt with unions in a number of circumstances and at an individual support level consider them worthwhile and intelligent:it is when they start flexing their political muscles with nothing remotely approaching a majority of the members in favour of strike action that I am reminded of the grim days of the 70s.

As it happens I agree with you; removing patronage from political parties would be a tremendous idea and relative to the overall burden of taxation cost would be negligible
So saying that most voters don't realise what red Ed's up to isn't patronising?
I have also spent many years dealing with unions in my workplace. Some excellent TU reps, some not so good and some plain disruptive - all part of the cut and thrust and up to management to win the arguments.
Tory backers? If you don't want to discuss, fair enough, let others draw their own conclusions.
no it isn't patronising: Red Ed's hard left tendencies are concealed under a patina of sweetness and light PR spin.
Having agreed that unions have an important place in the workplace, and also very much agreeing with your assessment of TU reps, it worries me that you imply the closure of schools and loss of education for innocent children 'the cut and thrust' . I don't think so........

Tory backers: as far as I'm concerned this post is about Red Ed, teachers and unions: it is a rather juvenile method of arguing much used by politicians that when any criticism is made, mud is thrown back instead of intelligible counter arguments.

Very happy to have the argument based on facts on a completely separate day: the two should not be co-mingled.
Ok, as far as I'm concerned it's absolutely fine for the Labour Party to receive funding from the trade unions. It's open, accountable, and at the end of the day the party grew out of the union movement. Absolutely nothing to be ashamed of. As another poster has pointed out, virtually all the benefits enjoyed by employees today were hard fought for by unions over the years. It was paid holidays plus working people having some disposable income (as well as the coming of the railway) that enabled Brighton to grow from a hard up fishing village , so better conditions benefitted the economy as a whole.
So, counter argument: the Union movement has nothing to be ashamed of. The loss of a days education for innocent children can just as easily be blamed on the government as on the unions/teachers.
I don't disagree: it's mostly open and transparent except for the occasional bit of election fixing. However I started my comments by trying to remind people what it was like the last time the unions had similar political dominance over the Labour party in the 1970s. This was a terrible period for everyone rich or poor (except for union bosses and the Communist Party) with rampant inflation ruining lives and I dread a return to similar times.
[quote][p][bold]her professional[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Bluebeef[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]her professional[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Bluebeef[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]her professional[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Bluebeef[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]her professional[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Bluebeef[/bold] wrote: When thinking about this never forget who these unions sponsor: yes it's Ed the Marxist genes Milliband[/p][/quote]These unions are all that's left to protect peoples' working conditions. Remember who is backing the Tories, shady tax avoiding "businessmen" lobbying for their own interests. at least the Unions represent the people who voted for them, Tory backers represent only themselves. As for the "Marxist Genes" tag, absolutely pathetic.[/p][/quote]Were you alive in the 70s: this country was nearly brought to its knees by the activities of politically motivated, Communist, Trotskyist, Marxist dominated unions who amongst other little gems forced a three-day week. Pathetic: Do you actually listen to Miliband's messages he wants to take as much further to the left.[/p][/quote]Yes I was alive and employed during the 70s. Just because the unions were arguably too powerful then doesn't make them inherently bad, the pendulum has swung back too far the other way. And whilst parroting the "red Ed backed by the Unions" mantra, you fail to address my point regarding the shady backers of the Tories ( and UKIP for that matter). Of course he'll take us to the left, he leads the Labour Party, get the idea. That way you have a choice of people on the political spectrum to vote for, and a significant proportion of voters would like something a bit more radical, just how many will be revealed at the election. The only way to avoid patronage of political parties and the subsequent influence of their backers would be to have all parties funded from taxation, probably not a popular idea in the current climate![/p][/quote]What a silly patronising response: the point I keep trying to make is that Ed wants to take us far to the left of our previous New Labour government but a distressing percentage of potential voters don't realise that. I really don't think I need to respond to your limp shady backers for Tories point every time I want to criticise Red Ed. I also happen to have dealt with unions in a number of circumstances and at an individual support level consider them worthwhile and intelligent:it is when they start flexing their political muscles with nothing remotely approaching a majority of the members in favour of strike action that I am reminded of the grim days of the 70s. As it happens I agree with you; removing patronage from political parties would be a tremendous idea and relative to the overall burden of taxation cost would be negligible[/p][/quote]So saying that most voters don't realise what red Ed's up to isn't patronising? I have also spent many years dealing with unions in my workplace. Some excellent TU reps, some not so good and some plain disruptive - all part of the cut and thrust and up to management to win the arguments. Tory backers? If you don't want to discuss, fair enough, let others draw their own conclusions.[/p][/quote]no it isn't patronising: Red Ed's hard left tendencies are concealed under a patina of sweetness and light PR spin. Having agreed that unions have an important place in the workplace, and also very much agreeing with your assessment of TU reps, it worries me that you imply the closure of schools and loss of education for innocent children 'the cut and thrust' . I don't think so........ Tory backers: as far as I'm concerned this post is about Red Ed, teachers and unions: it is a rather juvenile method of arguing much used by politicians that when any criticism is made, mud is thrown back instead of intelligible counter arguments. Very happy to have the argument based on facts on a completely separate day: the two should not be co-mingled.[/p][/quote]Ok, as far as I'm concerned it's absolutely fine for the Labour Party to receive funding from the trade unions. It's open, accountable, and at the end of the day the party grew out of the union movement. Absolutely nothing to be ashamed of. As another poster has pointed out, virtually all the benefits enjoyed by employees today were hard fought for by unions over the years. It was paid holidays plus working people having some disposable income (as well as the coming of the railway) that enabled Brighton to grow from a hard up fishing village , so better conditions benefitted the economy as a whole. So, counter argument: the Union movement has nothing to be ashamed of. The loss of a days education for innocent children can just as easily be blamed on the government as on the unions/teachers.[/p][/quote]I don't disagree: it's mostly open and transparent except for the occasional bit of election fixing. However I started my comments by trying to remind people what it was like the last time the unions had similar political dominance over the Labour party in the 1970s. This was a terrible period for everyone rich or poor (except for union bosses and the Communist Party) with rampant inflation ruining lives and I dread a return to similar times. Bluebeef
  • Score: 0

11:43pm Thu 10 Jul 14

hubby says...

stevo!! wrote:
hubby wrote:
I am a teacher.
I am expected to teach children manners,how to behave in public,how to dress,how to keep themselves clean,how to eat,how to have respect for other people,punctuality etc,etc.
All things that parents can't be bothered to do these days.
This is before I start "Teaching".
I feel so sorry for the poor parents who couldn't throw their sprogs out of the door at 8am and retrieve them at 4pm.
Do some teaching yourselves lazy parents.
Be parents.Not mates with your kids.
Can I ask how the 'keeping oneself clean' lessons work?
PSHE is the lesson,but simply taking a child to one side away from a lesson and explaining that the reason they are being "teased" not "bullied" is because their levels of personal hygiene are below what is expected, is something a parent should be doing rather than a teacher.
Body odour and bad breath are the main culprits.
[quote][p][bold]stevo!![/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]hubby[/bold] wrote: I am a teacher. I am expected to teach children manners,how to behave in public,how to dress,how to keep themselves clean,how to eat,how to have respect for other people,punctuality etc,etc. All things that parents can't be bothered to do these days. This is before I start "Teaching". I feel so sorry for the poor parents who couldn't throw their sprogs out of the door at 8am and retrieve them at 4pm. Do some teaching yourselves lazy parents. Be parents.Not mates with your kids.[/p][/quote]Can I ask how the 'keeping oneself clean' lessons work?[/p][/quote]PSHE is the lesson,but simply taking a child to one side away from a lesson and explaining that the reason they are being "teased" not "bullied" is because their levels of personal hygiene are below what is expected, is something a parent should be doing rather than a teacher. Body odour and bad breath are the main culprits. hubby
  • Score: 1

8:43am Fri 11 Jul 14

brightoncorsadriver says...

stevo!! wrote:
brightoncorsadriver wrote:
stevo!! wrote:
"Surely better working conditions for the teachers will directly result in better resources, lessons, learning environment and therefore education for your children? "

How do better working conditions for teachers lead to better resources for the children?
You are telling me that you would be more productive in your line of work with poorer working conditions than better working conditions?
My comment referred to 'resources'.

Shame I had to point that out.
Well that is also as easily answered, Unlike the much earlier days of education when you were given a textbook to work from put simply the teachers are responsible for making the resources for the children. The worksheets, handouts, homeworks, classroom displays etc are all created and differentiated by the teachers to suit the children in the class to provide an education for every child.
[quote][p][bold]stevo!![/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]brightoncorsadriver[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]stevo!![/bold] wrote: "Surely better working conditions for the teachers will directly result in better resources, lessons, learning environment and therefore education for your children? " How do better working conditions for teachers lead to better resources for the children?[/p][/quote]You are telling me that you would be more productive in your line of work with poorer working conditions than better working conditions?[/p][/quote]My comment referred to 'resources'. Shame I had to point that out.[/p][/quote]Well that is also as easily answered, Unlike the much earlier days of education when you were given a textbook to work from put simply the teachers are responsible for making the resources for the children. The worksheets, handouts, homeworks, classroom displays etc are all created and differentiated by the teachers to suit the children in the class to provide an education for every child. brightoncorsadriver
  • Score: 1

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