Chinese teachers hired to raise standards

Chinese teachers hired to raise standards

Chinese teachers hired to raise standards

First published in News
Last updated
by , Reporter

Chinese teachers are being hired to raise standards in maths.

St Paul’s Catholic College in Burgess Hill has been selected as one of 32 schools in the country to lead a Maths Hub which will kick off this autumn.

It will mean a Chinese teacher coming into the school to work with the maths department to drive up standards.

China is currently ranked first in the world in terms of students’ attainment in maths, while Great Britain can be found in 24th on the list by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development.

The aim of the Maths Hub project is to enhance the standards of teaching and quality of maths provision in this country.

Robert Carter, headteacher at St Paul’s Catholic College, said: “We are thrilled to be given the opportunity to work with our outstanding strategic partners to raise achievement in maths, develop innovative learning and inspire the best training for maths specialists.”

The school will be working in partnership with other schools on the scheme.

This work will be led through the Inspire Teaching School Alliance along with the Shanghai Teacher Exchange. This is designed to enable the school to learn from and work collaboratively with the highest-performing teachers in the world.

Elizabeth Truss MP was the education minister when the scheme was first launched.

She said: “Maths is the most important subject for a child’s future – it commands the highest earnings and provides the best protection against unemployment.”

Comments (8)

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9:02am Mon 21 Jul 14

power_ranger says...

23+72+9+special fried rice
23+72+9+special fried rice power_ranger
  • Score: 0

9:20am Mon 21 Jul 14

stevo!! says...

The militant teachers who occasionally refuse to teach our children must be delighted at this news........take THAT, Gove.......er.......
...
The militant teachers who occasionally refuse to teach our children must be delighted at this news........take THAT, Gove.......er....... ... stevo!!
  • Score: -25

2:40pm Mon 21 Jul 14

andrewedmondson says...

It might be even more effective if they replaced the students with Chinese students.

Comparison of performance between countries, e.g. using the PISA system, is fraught with difficulty. So many factors affect outcomes. In Hong Kong, for example, everyone has private tutors. And when the weighting of question types is changed, so does the international ranking.

I wonder how the teachers at St Paul's are reacting to this?

I'll be interested in reading a report of the outcomes. Who knows, it might work.

PS I have been a maths textbook author for 20 years. My main work is for Pearson, whose biggest international customer is .... China.
It might be even more effective if they replaced the students with Chinese students. Comparison of performance between countries, e.g. using the PISA system, is fraught with difficulty. So many factors affect outcomes. In Hong Kong, for example, everyone has private tutors. And when the weighting of question types is changed, so does the international ranking. I wonder how the teachers at St Paul's are reacting to this? I'll be interested in reading a report of the outcomes. Who knows, it might work. PS I have been a maths textbook author for 20 years. My main work is for Pearson, whose biggest international customer is .... China. andrewedmondson
  • Score: 1

4:55pm Mon 21 Jul 14

HJarrs says...

andrewedmondson wrote:
It might be even more effective if they replaced the students with Chinese students.

Comparison of performance between countries, e.g. using the PISA system, is fraught with difficulty. So many factors affect outcomes. In Hong Kong, for example, everyone has private tutors. And when the weighting of question types is changed, so does the international ranking.

I wonder how the teachers at St Paul's are reacting to this?

I'll be interested in reading a report of the outcomes. Who knows, it might work.

PS I have been a maths textbook author for 20 years. My main work is for Pearson, whose biggest international customer is .... China.
I think we should congratulate you on your obviously excellent text books given China's standing in maths.
[quote][p][bold]andrewedmondson[/bold] wrote: It might be even more effective if they replaced the students with Chinese students. Comparison of performance between countries, e.g. using the PISA system, is fraught with difficulty. So many factors affect outcomes. In Hong Kong, for example, everyone has private tutors. And when the weighting of question types is changed, so does the international ranking. I wonder how the teachers at St Paul's are reacting to this? I'll be interested in reading a report of the outcomes. Who knows, it might work. PS I have been a maths textbook author for 20 years. My main work is for Pearson, whose biggest international customer is .... China.[/p][/quote]I think we should congratulate you on your obviously excellent text books given China's standing in maths. HJarrs
  • Score: -3

5:01pm Mon 21 Jul 14

getThisCoalitionOut says...

What a ridiculous idea.

Kids need to start school later - that much is well known. Most countries in the world wouldn't dream of making kids start school at 4 years of age.

Kids should not be moved on until they have mastered what they are being taught.

Break up classes into smaller classes or teach kids one to one who are struggling.

A kid will quickly learn if taught one to one.

Our classes are far too big and a lot of teachers hate the kids - having favourites is not conducive to all the kids learning well in a class.

Classes need to be made more interesting. A kid will never learn when bored stiff.
What a ridiculous idea. Kids need to start school later - that much is well known. Most countries in the world wouldn't dream of making kids start school at 4 years of age. Kids should not be moved on until they have mastered what they are being taught. Break up classes into smaller classes or teach kids one to one who are struggling. A kid will quickly learn if taught one to one. Our classes are far too big and a lot of teachers hate the kids - having favourites is not conducive to all the kids learning well in a class. Classes need to be made more interesting. A kid will never learn when bored stiff. getThisCoalitionOut
  • Score: 2

5:40pm Mon 21 Jul 14

stevo!! says...

"Robert Carter, headteacher at St Paul’s Catholic College, said: “We are thrilled to be given the opportunity to work with our outstanding strategic partners to raise achievement in maths, develop innovative learning and inspire the best training for maths specialists.” "

Thereby admitting that his current Maths teacher is fairly useless.

Staff meetings are going to be tense, lol.
"Robert Carter, headteacher at St Paul’s Catholic College, said: “We are thrilled to be given the opportunity to work with our outstanding strategic partners to raise achievement in maths, develop innovative learning and inspire the best training for maths specialists.” " Thereby admitting that his current Maths teacher is fairly useless. Staff meetings are going to be tense, lol. stevo!!
  • Score: -9

6:10pm Mon 21 Jul 14

andrewedmondson says...

getThisCoallition Out whilst it may seem obvious that smaller class sizes will result in better outcomes, this is one factor that does not seem related to outcome, based on research. I was surprised to learn this.

I agree that the material being taught should be as interesting as possible but I doubt that interesting maths is what gives the Chinese better scores.

Motivation is everything. I was bored stiff at school but my motivation for doing well in maths was a tyrannical teacher. That's one form of motivation. Another is motivation to please parents.

There is no one size fits all magic about teaching maths, so I seriously doubt that the Chinese approach (whatever that is) will make much difference.

Children are different. They learn at different rates and have different abilities and backgrounds. It is so easy for a student to become screwed up in maths in the 10 years or so they study it.

What is amazing is the poor numeracy ability at the end of this lengthy period. I'm talking about the 10 times table and very basic maths. A lot of rote learning goes on in countries that appear to do better in maths. This can be done in a fun way but it really has to be done from an early age. Learning 3 ways to multiply two numbers together might be interesting but it's a recipe for disaster. That's just about the only thing Gove and I agree on.

Private tuition or one-to-one is very good, especially to sort out problems that students get stuck on. But it is expensive and takes time out of the rest of the curriculum.

We don't all need to be great at maths. If that is the government's aim, they will surely fail and divert valuable resources away from training that will be of use to students.

I would like to see some research done on why otherwise intelligent students fail at maths. I am confident that the answer will be far more complicated than adopting a new teaching approach.
getThisCoallition Out whilst it may seem obvious that smaller class sizes will result in better outcomes, this is one factor that does not seem related to outcome, based on research. I was surprised to learn this. I agree that the material being taught should be as interesting as possible but I doubt that interesting maths is what gives the Chinese better scores. Motivation is everything. I was bored stiff at school but my motivation for doing well in maths was a tyrannical teacher. That's one form of motivation. Another is motivation to please parents. There is no one size fits all magic about teaching maths, so I seriously doubt that the Chinese approach (whatever that is) will make much difference. Children are different. They learn at different rates and have different abilities and backgrounds. It is so easy for a student to become screwed up in maths in the 10 years or so they study it. What is amazing is the poor numeracy ability at the end of this lengthy period. I'm talking about the 10 times table and very basic maths. A lot of rote learning goes on in countries that appear to do better in maths. This can be done in a fun way but it really has to be done from an early age. Learning 3 ways to multiply two numbers together might be interesting but it's a recipe for disaster. That's just about the only thing Gove and I agree on. Private tuition or one-to-one is very good, especially to sort out problems that students get stuck on. But it is expensive and takes time out of the rest of the curriculum. We don't all need to be great at maths. If that is the government's aim, they will surely fail and divert valuable resources away from training that will be of use to students. I would like to see some research done on why otherwise intelligent students fail at maths. I am confident that the answer will be far more complicated than adopting a new teaching approach. andrewedmondson
  • Score: 4

11:59pm Mon 21 Jul 14

rolivan says...

power_ranger wrote:
23+72+9+special fried rice
So what about 8+8+8?
[quote][p][bold]power_ranger[/bold] wrote: 23+72+9+special fried rice[/p][/quote]So what about 8+8+8? rolivan
  • Score: 0

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